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T.M 



nnual 
ntenna 
^sue! 

Mew Articles 



ruising 
he Coral Sea 

age 28 

araboias 



•urefire 
ultibanders 

age 60 

'astic Pipe 
or 2 l\/leters 

-ge 37 



tari Yagis 

ge84 



74470 



6594 6 



Intematioffial EdftlCHfi 



May 19S4 $2.50 
Issue #284 



Amateur Radio's 
lechnical Journal 



B 



A Wayne Green Publtcatfon 



From Base to Beams 

Hofne-bfew from the ground upt Here's 
how to build a lawet and top it oH with 



\ 



pefformance-proven antennas- 



W6TYH 10 



tN 



A Little Gem for QRP 

The T2FD antenna thinks ifs a full-size 
rhombic. Feeding is believing. 
W8VFT 

"The Tops of the Palm Trees" 

20,000 QSOs. Coral Sea. BanyamUf. 

VK7RH 

I 

How to Gain with PVC 

This could be historv's cheapest quad 
Try water pipe on 2m 



\ 



Helicoids 

Few people understated how to build 
these versatile whips Thrs article takes 



\ 



care of all the ifs, ^ids, and butts. 



\ 



Simple Parabolic Theory 

Wrlh a little bil of math — presented 
here — vou can understand, design, 



\ 



build, and enjoy these effective antennas. 
Hopefully OA4KOA'V5 



Powder— 56 



26 



28 



WB6BHI 37 



K2KSV 40 



The Big-Car Break-Down Beam 

Try twOHTieter luxury the easy way. 

N3BEK 46 



52 





PVC— 37 



Control Your Mobile Power 

X" Can cofUFf^yting be a daily QSO party? 
^^ Yes, with this no-payment installment 
plan ICB5QZ 

Virginia's Antenna Farmer 

From Falls Church comes a simple mes- 
sage to fallow hams: Simple antennas 
WA4BLC 



56 



^ 



work 



60 



Throw in TV 

HWhy not? This helix-building experience 
jncfudes every thing else. 



WA4WDL 64 



Vagi Fear! 

|T3 Forget it Whether for construction or 
1^ comparison, this Atari program zaps 

every design problem. ... W6WTU 84 

Next Month: 
Sweepstakes Results 

Did you win a piece of Wayne Green's hamshack? 



Never Say D!e— 6 


Cont^ts— 106 




73 Irrt&mational— 72 


Fun I -^107 




Ham Help- 


New Products— 109 




so, 07, too. 107 


RTTY Loop-110 




Social Events —91 


Reader Servic©— 114 




Barter ^N' Buy— 96 


DX 116 




Dr. Digital— 96 


Revl&w— 117 




SatellHes-lOO 


Letters— 118 




Correct (on$— 100 


Dealer Directofy— 146 




Awards— 102 


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ICOM Is proud to announce 
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R»c#tv»r. Ltfil^zing an iCOM 
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adjustable AGC and noise 
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eliminate the woodpecker), 
audio tone control, plus Rif with 
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t^^ont mUtw. The transmitter 
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selection of transmitter LPF's. 
transmit oudio tone control> 
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a high petlormance speech 
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fast break-in keying. 

EHiat Dual VFOs 

controHed by a lorge tuning 
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split frequencies used in DX 
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In \OHz increments and 
Increosing th© speed of rotation 
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automaticallv Pushing the 
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32 M^mortds. Thirty-two 

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others are bypassed. Data may 
be transferred l^etween VFO's, 



from VFO to memofies, or from 
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high shape factor FL44A. 455KHz 
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73 Magazine * May, 1984 3 



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INFO 



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73 Magazine • May, 1984 5 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ec/itor/a/ by Wayne Green 




CODE OR NO CODE? 

The FCC*s lengthy release re- 
porting on their turning down of 
the na<:ode proposal indicated 
that there was a great lioanimity 
of thought by the hams and 
clubs who where interested 
enough to comment on this sub- 
ject, Morse code nrrust be kept 
as a fundamental skill for being 
an amateur— that was the edict. 
Presumably this was not merely 
an emotionai response but a 
well-reasoned one— and thus 
one which all of us should ex- 
pect to live with and honor. 

There was a high degree of 
agreement that when the chips 
are down— perhaps referring to 
EMP and its destructive effect 
on ICs— CW can always get 
through. Well, heck, yes, if we 
have a key at hand to send CW. 
But more and more rigs are tie- 
ing made without even a key 
jack^ I'd say that in view of this 
statement of amateur senti- 
ments, we should quickly bring 
a halt to that and make sure that 
every new rig has a key Jack. 



Perhaps two out of three of 
the transceivers being soid 
these days are for VHP and de- 
signed for phoneonly opera- 
tion. Obviously we are contribut- 
ing to serious future problems 
by moving away from the cod© 
in this way. \ suggest that our 
first response to this unanimity 
on the code be to put pressure 
on the manufacturers not only 
to put a key Jack on every hand 
transceiver, but to insist that 
they build a small key right Into 
them and Include a tone mod- 
ulator. 

If you remind the manufactur- 
ers that you are sertous about 
Morse code— that you really 
beHeve it is important (you were 
being truthful in your comments 
to the FCC, right?)— they'll have 
to build CW into their rigs. And if 
they don't respond, I might 
follow up with a proposal to the 
FCC to make it illegal to sell a 
transmitter without a key jack. 
All hand rigs should have the 
complete key built in, obviously, 
since there is no practical way 
to hold the rig in one hand, the 



COL B, J, SMITH usAF (retired^ 

AFO SF 96298 BAGUtO CITY 

THE SUMMEN CAPITAL 
OF THE PHtUPPfNES 



APO SF 96298 



RADD CONFIFft/IING QSO OF 



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K5.HF K8LNY OUNL DXU.NY VSBAS 



QSL OF THE MONTH 

To enter your QSL pui ^t in an envelop6 Motig vnith ycHur choice o1 a book fnORi 73' s 
Radio Bookshop and maik It to 73, Ptne Street, Peterborough NH 03458, Attn: QSL Of th« 
Month. Entriea not in envelopes or without a book choice will not be aocepted. 

6 73 Magazine • May, 1934 



key in the other, and then try to 
send. 

tt will be easy to bultd a small 
paddie key into our liTs. With 
that you wiil t>e abie to send with 
one paddie as a straight l<ey or 
with both as a speed key. And, of 
course, speed Is the only way to 
go for emergency communica* 
tions. 

Speed. Hmmm. Ttiat brings 
up a major problem. With CW 
now recognized by the FCC via 

your comments on the no-code 
proposal as being of far more 
importance than previousiy 
thought, we have a grave re- 
sponsibility. When The ChJps 
Are Down (WTCAO) and hams 
are the only means of communi- 
cations in an emergency— and 
we have to use CW— code 
speed is going to be of incalcu- 
luable Importance. Even rela- 
tively small emergencies seem 
to generate enormous amounts 
of message traffic, so we will t^e 
in one hell of a mess if some 
turkey In the chain that we are 
depending on can't handle the 
code at a reasonable speed. 
One lazy jerk could bog every- 
thing down* bringing discredit to 
our entire fraternity. 

Well, then, granted that your 
comments are right and CW is 
our number one means of com* 
munications, what code speed 
should we accept as adequate? 
tn the commercial world, t^ack 
whan they used the code in- 
stead of digital communica- 
tions a couple generations ago, 
35 words per minute was the ac- 
cepted code speed. That was 
average. Is there any reason 
why we should t>e any less than 
average? Of course not. We 
should be better than the old 
average commercial ops, right? 

This means that we really 

Continued on page 106 



STAFF 



eOlTOIVrUBUSHEA 
Wwyrm Green W2l4Sa/1 

A5ST. EDrronf^UBUSHER 
J«f T DaTray WS$BTH 

ecicunvE editor 

JohnCSurraitt 
HANAaif^Q IDfTOn 

ASST. MAMjbQma E5rrofl 

StBVB Jpwfiitt 

TECHMICAyiMrEniiATIOIiAL EDTTDR 
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Jfv H- Mflflon 

eiriP»r«rn3kWA6ITF 

Pttef StarK K20AW 

Rqberl SwLrsk/ AP2M 



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3«n(fra DuMfii 

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From Base to Beams 

Home-brew from the ground up! Here's how to build a tower 
and top it off with performance-proven antennas. 



Harry a Hooton W67TH 
1420 Shamrock Lane 
Uncoh CA 9S64& 



During my 53 years as a 
licensed radio ama- 
teur, I have owned a number 
of masts and towers rang- 
ing from the old-time 




Photo A. The two monobander arrays mounted on the tow- 
er The upper array is a 2'^/ement 1 5-meter yagi using a line- 
bazooka matching system. The 15-meter array is rotatable 
over 360 degrees. The 10-meter, 3-element yagi also used a 
modified line-bazooka matching system. The 1 0-meter array 
is rotatable over a 60-degree arc The 10-meter array is used 
strictly for communication with the South Pacific area, VK, 
ZL, eta 

10 73 Magazir^e • May, 1984 



A-frame wooden mast to a 
modern 80-foot commer- 
cial steel tower. At the age 
of three score and ten plus 
two, I am no longer enthusi- 
astic about climbing and 
working on top of a high 
tower of standard design 
and construction. 

Since 1978, I have been 
experimenting with multi- 
mode arrays, some of which 
are physicaliv large and 
electrically complex. These 
antenna systems require 
many measurements and 
adjustments necessitating 
removal of the array from 
the tower and reinstalling it 
after the adjustments or 
changes are completed. To 
further complicate matters, 
W6TYH is located in the 
country, far away from 
other hams- Most non-ham 
neighbors are less than en- 
thusiastic when it comes to 
raising and lowering the 
usual amateur array that 
goes up or down perhaps 
once a year. When an array 
must be raised, lowered, 
and raised again every day 
over a period of perhaps 
two weeks, helping-hand 
neighbors or friends are 
conspicuous by their ab* 
sence. Long ago, I found 
that the dyed-in-the-wool 
antenna experimenter is re- 
garded by his neighbors 
[and by some fellow hams) 
as a kind of nutty individual 
to be avoided at all times 
when arrays are to be in- 



stalled or removed from the 
tower, 

Obviously, what is need- 
ed is an antenna support 
structure that can be easily 
installed at minimum cost 
and will permit one man to 
install or remove arrays 
safely and easily. The tow- 
er to be described is de- 
signed to fulfill these re- 
quirements. 

Tower Design and 
Construction 

The multi-mode array, be- 
cause of its large size, re- 
quires a strong tower. Also, 
the tower, if possible, should 
be made free-standing since 
guys and other support de- 
vices make the raising or 
lowering of an array diffi- 
cult. When matching or 
phasing adjustments are 
made, it is essential that the 
array be at least 1 5 to 20 feet 
above the ground. Other- 
wise, there will be an exces- 
sive amount of "cut and 
try/' resulting in much labor 
and a waste of time. 1 n the 
interests of economy, it is 
desirable to design the tow- 
er so that readily available 
accessories such as exten- 
sion ladders, hoists, etc., can 
be used when required. All 
of the materials should be 
available locally; scrap or 
surplus iron pipe and angle- 
iron cross members can be 
used. The tower can be con- 
structed without welding or 
brazing techniques (usually 




&IIP VIEW 



Photo B. The tower top section showing the rotator and the 
IS-meter array. The matching stub, made from two copper 
tubes, is mounted on insulators above the boom. Note the 
)i'inch stabilizing ropes attached to the bottom of the rota- 
tor unit Also r}0te the trailing ii-inch nylon ropes attached 
to the ends of the boom. These are used to secure the array 
during windstorms. This tower and array have survived 
winds of over 60 mpk The tower also supports a 40-meter 
inverted-V dipole. 



not availdbie to the average 

ham). 

As shown in the photos 
and drawings, the tower is 
constructed as a cage of 
four yi-inch<lJameter iron 
pipes arranged around a 
1%-fnch central pipe core. 
The tower shown here is 
made up from black, non- 
galvanized iron pipe which 
was obtained from a scrap- 
metal dealer. To prevent 
rusting out with time, the 
black iron pipe must be 
painted, first with a primer 
coat and then with two 
coats of implement enamel. 
If you use galvanized pipe, 
it is not necessary to paint 
the tower unless this is desir- 
able for aesthetic purposes. 
The four V^-inch pipes are 
firmly attached, by means 
of angle-iron cross members 
and U4>olt5, to the large-di- 
ameter center pipe. The cen- 
ter pipe extends upward 20 
feet above the ground. The 
Vj-inch pipe is manufac- 
tured in 21 -foot lengths. For 
ease in handling, each 



21 -foot length is cut into two 
10-foot 6-inch lengths. The 
shorter lengths are threaded 
at each end so that two or 
more sections can be con- 
nected together with stan- 
dard Vi-inch pipe couplings. 
The tower is extended up- 
ward by adding the 10-foot, 
64nch lengths to the desired 
height. Although the cage 
structure of this particular 
tower extends upward only 
20 feet, it should be possible 
to construct a free-standing 
tower to a height of at least 
35 to 40 feet above the 
ground. 

If a higher cage structure 
is desired, the use of appro- 
priate guys is recommend* 
ed. With a 20-foot-high cage, 
an array can be raised to 
about 35 feet above the 
ground. With a 40-foot-high 
cage, an array can be raised 
to at least 50 to 55 feet 
above the ground provided, 
of course, that the tower 
structure is properly guyed. 
The 20-foot cage height was 
selected so that a standard 




Hi J^ 



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I- 



tJ , 1 I a PLACES 

Fig. 1. Cross^nember dimensions. Sixteen pieces of angle 
iron required— 1 Vi " wide each side. 



20-foot aluminum extension 
ladder can be placed 
against the tower, making it 
easier to climb. 

The array is mounted on 
the top of a 21 -foot-long, 
IVi-inch iron pipe placed 
vertically against the cage 
section. By means of winch 
and ratchet this pipe can be 
extended about 1 6 to 1 6 feet 
above the top of the cage 
section for a total height of 
about 36 to 38 feet. This fea- 
ture will be described in 
more detail later. The angle- 
iron cross members are 
spaced at about 2V2-foot in- 
tervals up the central pipe. 
The tower is erected in ex- 
actly the same manner as 
that of a commercial radio- 
or TV-station tower — by 
adding on sections until the 
desired height is obtained. 

Tower Insfallation 

First, select a suitable site 
for the tower. If you expect 
to be taking arrays up and 
down the tower frequently, 
do not erect the tower 
against the side of a build- 
ing. Make certain that the 
array, when mounted on the 
tower, can rotate freely 
without coming near other 
antennas, trees, power lines, 
metal roofs, or buildings. 
Trees and other non-metal- 
lic objects will have no ef- 
fect, for all practical pur- 
poses, on the tuning or oper- 
ation of an array, provided 
that the element tips do not 
approach closer than 15 or 
20 feet during operation. If 
the array is mounted within 
20 to 25 feet of a metallic 
object such as a metal roof 



or power line, the line swr 
will usually vary as the array 
is rotated. Arrays mounted 
close to any object metallic 
or not, are often noisy on 
reception. 

Once the site is selected, 
dig a hole in the ground as 
shown in Fig 2 The hole 
should be about 18 inches 
across. The depth will de- 
pend upon the type of soil at 
the selected site. For clay or 
similar hard-packed soils, a 
depth of about 4 feet will be 
sufficient If the soil is sandy 
or gravelly in nature, the 
hole should be made deep- 
er, to perhaps 5 or 6 feet- At 
the W6TTH antenna site, the 
soil is decomposed granite 
which packs solid in dry 
weather but becomes very 
soft during the rainy season. 
The hole for the tower base 
was dug to a depth of about 
5 feet and side brace sup- 
ports were added to the 
tower at a height of about 8 
feet above the ground. The 
ends of the side supports 
(Vi-inch pipe) extend into 
the ground for about 3 feet 
and are held firmly in place 
by "deadmen'' made by 
pouring concrete in each 
hole. 

Fill the bottom of the hole 
to a depth of about 4 inches 
with egg^ize gravel Stand 
the large center pipe on its 
end on the gravel and guy or 
brace it in an upright posi- 
tion. Pour another 2 or 3 
inches of gravel around the 
center pipe. This allows it to 
extend below the base of 
the concrete and also per- 
mits moisture from inside 
the center pipe to drain into 

73 Magazine • May, 1984 11 



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3* G*?AVEL 
t- ieG<^ SIZED) 



to" 



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Fig. 2. Tower base. 

the gravel. Before pouring center pipe, about 3 inches 
the concrete mix, coat the above and below the space 




PDSrriQfi or TOP SCCT)Of« 



I I/?' CENTeW ^JPE 



i/'s' sioe Pipe 

2 SHOWN 
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20' 2 



^ND CROSS 
MEMBEf? 



SHOWING TWO SETS 
OF CH0S5 MEMBERS 



1ST CROSS 

MEIVTBEA 



I^BQUFjQ LII^E 



CONtltETE 



r#^ 



F/g. J> How Vz " p/pes are attached to venka! cenfer p/pe 

12 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



A 



where the top of the con- 
crete base is to be located, 
with waterproof asphalt roof- 
patching materiaL Check 
with a carpenter's plumb 
and level to make sure that 
the center pipe is plumb 
before pouring the concrete, 
then repeat the process 
afterward. While plumbing 
the center pipe, do not pull 



it up into the liquid concrete 
or push it down into the 
ground. The lower two or 
three angle-iron cross mem- 
bers should be attached to 
the center pipe before it is 
placed in the hole. With the 
hole filled to within three or 
four inches below the sur- 
face of the ground, allow 
the concrete to ''set" for 
about 48 hours. 

After the concrete base 
has solidiHed, attach the 
first four Vj-tnch iron-pipe 
cage uprights as shown in 
Fig, 3. The bottom ends of 
the Vi -inch pipes are capped 
and will extend downward 
about four inches below the 
space where the top of the 
concrete base will be locat- 
ed. It is not necessary to pro- 
vide for drainage of the side 
pipes provided that each 
member is sealed by the 
caps at the top and bottom. 
When the side pipes are se- 
curely fastened to the angle- 
iron cross members, using 
the smaller U-bolts, finish 
pouring the concrete and 
crown the top of the base, as 
shown in Fig. 4, to prevent 
water from accumulating at 
the point where the upright 




Photo C. LoweT section of tower showing construction. The 
tower has two braces (Vi'' pipe) attached 8 feet above 
ground. The lower cage section extends upward 20 feet 
above the concrete base. 




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members enter the base. 
Again allow the concrete 
base to harden tor about 46 
hours before assembling the 
remainder of the tower. 

After the base section has 
been installed, mount the 
angle-iron cross members at 
jntervals of about four feet, 
alt the way up to the top of 
the center pipe, and secure 
the four Vi-inch pipes in 
place with their U-bolts. The 
U-boit nuts should be drawn 
tight so that the joint is rigid* 
ly secure, 

Although this tower is suf* 
ficientiy strong to be self- 
supporting at heights of up 
to 40 feet for safety's sake, 
while working on the tower, 
it is advisable to attach at 
least three guys at the 
20-foot level, space them 
around the tower 120° 
apart, and secure them to 
iron stakes driven into the 
ground. There Is always the 
possibility when working on 
a new tower that the con- 
crete is not completely set 
and the tower may fall when 
it is unbalanced by the 
weight of a man climbing it. 

The Adjustable 
Upper Section 

After the 20-foot cage 
(lower) section has been in- 
stalled, the adjustable upper 
section, a IVi -inch-diame- 
ter, 21 -foot -long iron pipe, is 
placed vertically against the 
cage section, parallel with 




Photo D. Midsection of tower showing how top section of 

pipe is mounted. The top section can be extended 18 feet 
above the224oot bottom sect ion --a total height of 40 feet. 
Note that the 52-Ohm coaxial cable and the rotator control 
cable are dressed away from the tower white the top section 
is being raised. 




the V/i-inch center pipe. 
The lower end of the adjust- 
able section rests on top of 
the concrete base. With a 
rope or wire, temporarily tie 
the 1 Vi -inch pipe to the cen- 
ter pipe at the top, center, 
and bottom of the cage sec- 
tion to keep it upright. Pre- 
pare four 1 %-inch U-bolts as 
shown in Fig. 5, The two 
standoff nuts on each U-bolt 
will allow the U-bolt to be 



» Si'4^ C£iirC1l PiPC 



1/2* BiDt F^IPE 

AFTEf? 4S HOURS INSTALL 
1/2" SIDE PIPES AMD POUR 
CONCRETE SECTIDId B 



iGjfflUHD LEVEL 



CAP 



9MSTALL CEKTEH PiPE 
iDtD POUR CONCRETE 
fO MEffE ALl-QW 
CONCtttfE TW *5ET' 
FOIt 4i HOURS 



rigidly mounted on the 
angle-iron cross members 

and keep the 1 W-inch pipe 
upright while permitting it 
to be raised. 

This method is probably 
the simplest means of allow- 
ing the upper section to be 
raised or lowered while still 
maintaining a safe and 
strong mount. If the upper 
section is to be left per- 
manently in the raised posi* 
tion, when it is in its final 
position, each of the 
1 V^-inch U-bolts is removed, 
one at a time, and the two 
standoff nuts are removed. 
The U-bolt is now reinserted 
through the two holes in the 
angle-iron cross member 
and its two remaining nuts 
are drawn down tightly. If 
the upper section is to be 



TOf^ ¥ft» 



raised and lowered fre- 
quently, leave the U4x)!ts as 

originally installed and se- 
cure the top section as will 
be described later 

Depending on the height 
of the lower cage section (20 
feet in the prototype tower), 
thel Vi -inch pipe will extend 
about 1 or 2 feet above the 
top of the cage section 
Thus, it can be reached easi- 
ly from a 20-foot aluminum 
extension ladder placed at 
an angle against the side of 
the tower. In the photos and 
drawings you will notice 
that the last angle-iron cross 
member, at the top of the 
cage section, extends out- 
ward about 6 inches from 
each Va-inch side pipe. My 
20-foot extension ladder is 
fitted with two bicycle- 
hanger hooks at the top. 
When the ladder is extend* 
ed, the two hooks fit over 
the ends of the angle-iron 
cross members, keeping the 
ladder securely in place, 
The lower end of the ladder 
rests on the ground but is 
held in place by tie wires to 
two iron stakes driven into 
the ground Since the ladder 
is placed against the tower 
at an angle, it is much easier 
to stand on and more com- 
fortable than trying to hang 
on to the tower with one 
hand and work mith the 
other. A strong web safety 
harness attached to the tow- 
er enables me to work in 
comfort and with safety, 

iitsta Hat fori of the 
Rotator Unit 

The array shown in the 
photos is a 2-element beam 
antenna similar to that de- 
scribed in the May, 1980, is- 
sue of 73. The rotator unit 
used with this antenna is the 
CDE AR-22 which is de- 




I 3/4* y-fiOUT 



LEAVE SftiCe ARCHJi^lD PJPE SO 
TOP SECTION tAN WOVE 
FAEELt UP AHti DOWN 



efTAVEL 



T T 

t* I 3/4' *| 



fig. 4. Second step in pouring concrete base. 

14 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



fig: 5. U-bolts for supporting top section. 




I 



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L* I §0*1 CCrtJPI-EIT 



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TTO*ei* 




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HOSE CLAMP 
STRAP Glhl POLE 
ro SIDE OF 

rowEfi 



Tomt^ 



Fig. 6. C/n-po/e assemhfy for raising array. 



signed for use with targe TV 
receiving antennas. This ro- 
tator is perf ectiv suitable for 
short-boom, 2- or 3-eIement 
beam antennas designed for 
operation on 10 or 15 me- 
ters. For long-boom arrays, 
use the Ham rotator which is 
designed to support and 
rotate a much heavier load. 
When the AR-22 or any simi- 
lar unit is used with long- 
boom arrays, the up and 
down rocking motion of the 
boom in a windstorm will 
damage the gears of the ro- 
tator unit. 

If you look closely at the 
photograph, you will notice 
a trailing Va -inch nylon rope 
attached to each end of the 



boom. In normal use, the 
ropes simply hang down and 
rotate with the antenna. 
During windstorms, how- 
ever, they are used to lash 
down the array to prevent 
the rocking of the boom 
referred to above. Two other 
Vi-inch nylon ropes are at- 
tached to the guying loops 
on the bottom edge of the 
rotator unit and serve to 
stabilize the upper section 
and the array during severe 
windstorms. Using these 
precautions, the tower and 
array have been subjected 
to a 70-mph wind without 
damage. 

The 4-wire control cable 
should be attached to the 




I l/t' PtPC STUB 
TO ffOTO** UNIT 



fig. 7. Boom-to-stub mounting. 

16 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



rotator before it is installed 
on the tower. The terminal 
boards on both the rotator 
and control units are 
marked 1, 2, 3, and 4, left to 
right The flat 4-wire rotor 
cable has one bright (tinned) 
conductor and three plain 
copper wires. The tinned 
(bright) lead connects to ter- 
minal 1 on both the rotor 
and control units. The sec* 
ond conductor is then con- 
nected to terminal 2, etC- If 
the terminal boards are 
wired in this manner, either 
unit may be disconnected 
and reconnected without 
wiring errors. 

After the rotator and con- 
trol units are electrically 
connected together, plug 
the control unit into the 
110-V-ac source and turn 
the indicator pointer to 
NORTH. When the rotator 
has stopped turning, mark 
one side of the upper sec- 
tion with chalk or a spot of 
white paint. When the rota- 
tor is installed on the top 
section, turn the marked 
side of the unit toward the 
north. Tighten the mounting 
U-bolts until the saw teeth 
of the clamps bite into the 
metal pipe. The easiest way 
to lift the rotator unit to the 
top of the cage section is to 
raise it with a rope and pul- 
ley. With the safety belt or 
rope attached to the tower, 
lift the rotator unit over the 
top end of the 1 Vi4nch pipe, 
turn the white spot toward 
the north, and tighten the 
U45olt nuts. 

Installing the Array 

For an easy installation of 
the array, make up a gin 
pole as shown in Fig, 6. The 
12"inch L arm has an at- 
tached rope and pulley as 
shown. If the array weighs 
40 pounds or less, the rope 
can be a length of ^/4-inch 
nylon. For heavier arrays, a 
16 -inch nyfon rope is recom- 
mended. Make sure that you 
have the proper size pulley 
for the rope in use and that 
the rope runs freely through 
the pulley opening. 

One end of the rope is 
tied to the centernDf^ravity 



point on the boom. Have 
someone hold the other end 
of the rope, taking up the 
slack as you climb the lad- 
der guiding the array up the 
tower When you reach the 
top of the ladder, have the 
assistant pull on the rope to 
raise the array to a point 
about a foot or so above the 
top of the rotator. Carefully 
lower and guide the array 
mounting stub into the rota- 
tor mount. Tighten the 
U-bolt nuts until the teeth of 
the clamps firmly dig into 
the metal pipe stub. The 
boom4o-stub mounting as- 
sembly is illustrated in Fig. 7. 

Raising the Top Section 

After the rotator and the 
array are installed as out- 
lined above, we are ready to 
raise the top section to maxi- 
mum height The coaxial 
transmission line is connect- 
ed to the array feedpoint be- 
fore the top section is raised. 
The junction of the tine and 
the feedpoint must be 
wrapped with several layers 
of plastic tape to prevent 
the entry of moisture. If the 
coaxial line is made a multi* 
pie of a half wavelength, the 
swr bridge can be inserted in 
series with the line at any 
half-wave point and the swr 
or impedance value indicat- 
ed will be the same as that 
at the array feedpoint The 
coaxial line and the control 
cable should be dressed 
away from the tower while 
the top section is being 
raised. Use plenty of slack in 
these lines to prevent them 
binding or snagging on the 
tower cross members. 

As mentioned previously, 
the 1 '/a -inch pipe top sec- 
tion is held in the vertical 
position by the U bo Its act- 
ing as slip rings. If you in- 
tend to raise or lower the 
top section frequently, it is 
worthwhile to install a low- 
cost winch and cable assem- 
bly, such as that used on 
trailers for small boats, to al- 
low the section to be 
cranked up or down with lit- 
tle effort. Since W6TYH is 
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f /g. S. D/mensfons of J-e/ement 70-meter array. 



that are useful for lifting or 
hoisting heavy objects such 
as the tower top section, The 
device that we used is gen- 
erally referred to as a "come- 
along" and has a ratchet 
operated by a long handle. 
To raise a load, the han- 
dle is pumped in the same 
manner as that of an auto- 
mobile jack- A small-size 
hoist that sells for about 
fifteen dollars at auto parts 
stores will lift an 800-pound 
load to about 20 feet. 

Guys 

This tower is free-standing 
and is not guyed in the usual 
sense of the term. However, 
a pulley with about 100 feet 
of ys-inch nylon rope is at- 
tached to the lower section 
of the rotator unit, primarily 
for the installation of a 
40-meter rnverted-V dipole 
antenna. In addition, two 
60-foot, ^i-inch nylon ropes 
are tied to the guying loops 
at the bottom of the rotator, 
During normal weather con- 
ditions, these ropes are sim- 
ply dressed down one side 
of the tower and secured to 
the lowest cross member. 
During high winds, however, 
the ropes can be played out 
as guys and used to stabilize 
the tower. Also, you will no- 
tice that each array has a 
length of yg-inch nylon rope 
trailing from each end of the 
boom. During normal opera- 
te 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



tion, these ropes simply 
hang down and rotate with 
the array, When the weather 
is bad, with strong winds, the 
trailing ropes are secured to 
the tower to prevent the ar- 
rays from rocking up and 
down which might damage 
the gears of the rotator unit 

The Arrays 

This tower has supported 

many arrays during the past 
several years. Photo A 
shows the tower with the 
two arrays in use at present. 
The upper array is a 2-ele- 
ment, 15-meter beam anten- 
na which was described in 
the May, 1980, issue of 73. 
This array, the LB-2, has 
been in use for about 7 years 
and has proved to be an ex- 
cellent DX antenna for both 
transmitting and receiving. 
The forward gain is 5 3 dB 
over a dipole under similar 
operating conditions. For 
constructional and adjust- 
ment data, refer to the arti- 
cle in the above-named 
issue. 

The second array (at the 
lower level) is a 3-element, 
10-meter array designed for 
maximum forward gain con- 
sfstent with optimum front- 
to-back ratio The forward 
gain is 8.5 dB over a dipole. 
The spacings of the ele- 
ments and the element 
lengths, together with the di- 
mensions of the matching 





Phofo £. Cross-member con^ 

struct ional details. 



system, combine to produce 
a perfect impedance match 
between the array feed point 
and the 52'Ohm coaxial 
transmission line. The di- 
mensions of the 3-element 
array are given in Fig. 8. 

The driven and parasitic 
elements are made up from 
the popular "hobby" alumi- 
num tubing sold at many 
hardware stores and build- 
ing-suppty houses. The cen- 
ter sections are 8-foot 
lengths of V^ -inch-diameter 
tubes (0,055-inch wall thick- 
ness). With the 0.055-jnch 
wall thickness, a %-inch o,d. 
tube will telescope snugly 
within the W-inch o,d. tube. 

The inside and outside 
surfaces of these tubes have 
an oxidized finish which 
must be removed from the 
two surfaces that make elec- 
trical contact. To remove 
the oxidized finish from the 
telescoping portion of the 
smaller tube, sand its out- 
side surface with 00 sandpa- 
per and then polish it with 
steel wool until the surface 
is bright and shiny. The 
finish may be removed from 
the inside surface of the 
larger tube by wrapping a 
smaller diameter wooden 
dowel with a strip of sand- 
paper or emery cloth and 
moving it up and down in- 
side the tube until the inner 
surface is bright and clean. 
Before the elements are 
finally assembled, the 



telescoping contact sur- 
faces should be coated with 
an antioxidizing compound, 
available at most electrical' 
supply stores. 

After the reflector and di- 
rector elements are assem- 
bled and adjusted to the 
correct lengths, the electri- 
cal connection may be 
made secure by four or five 
self-tapping stainless-steel 
sheet-metal screws arranged 
in a spiral around the tube. 
After the joint is made se- 
cure electrically, wrap it 
with several layers of plastic 
tape to keep out air and 
moisture. If each end of 
each element is sealed with 
a wooden plug and water- 
proof cement, the joints will 
not corrode and will main- 
tain good electrical contact 
for several years. 

The Driven Element and 
Matching-Stub Adjustments 

In the stub-matching sys- 
tem, the dimensions of the 
stub and the overall length 
of the driven element are 
crrttcal. The stub acts as an 
inductive reactance (XJ and 
the antenna is adjusted to 
act as a capacitive reac- 
tance [XqI The correct com- 
bination of the two reac* 
tances will resonate the driv- 
en element at the desired 
frequency, 28.6 MHz in this 
case. The stub also acts as a 
balun, converting the 52- 
Ohm unbalanced imped- 
ance at test point A to a bal- 
anced 17- to 20Ohm imped- 
ance at the center of the 
driven element. The imped- 
ance stepdown ratio (about 
3 to 1) is determined by the 
ratio of the stub, Xl, and the 
antenna, X^. With stubs of 
the specified dimensions, 
the length of the driven ele- 
ment tip to tip, will be 
about 5 inches shorter than 
the length required for 
resonance with the common 
gamma match. The band- 
width of the array, each side 
of the center frequency, is 
dependent upon the correct 
ratio of the two reactances 
and the spacing of the two 
stub conductors. Extensive 
experimental work has 




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The COMPUTER PATCH has become the new standard of excellence for computer 
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AEA has developed the most sophisticated line of automatic microcomputenzed Morse keyers 
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ANTENNAS 



F 



The ISOPOLE'* patented antenna has caused more excitement In Innovative VHFantennadesign than 
any antenna in recent history. Initially called a "gimmick" antenna by our competitors, all the laughter 
has long since subsided as the ISOPOLE has proven to be a high performer, rugged yet sleek 
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I 



n the same vein, me AEA Ho! Rad'"antenna rs shorter, lignier and (ess bulky than competitive 5/8 wave 
two meter handheld whips. Equally important, the Hot Rod does not have an out-of-phase current at 
the base that distorts the pattern as in the case of the SB wave competitors. This means actual on-the- 
horizon gain for the Hoi Rod relative to the 5/8 wave In spite of the fact thai a tuning network to match 
an end fed half-wave is far more difficult lo achieve than for a 5/6 wave, the Hoi Rod Is priced to 
compete. 

I Please Send: I 

. D Catalog D Dealer Lis! O Price List D Other ( 

I I 



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73 Magazine • May, 1984 19 



■^ 



HCRE 




OF 5 T 410 ISCE TEXT* 



-1- 3 



SOLDER 

HERE 



lf4SfD€ TUBE 



A* 



1^^" COPPER 
rUBING 




POLYETHTtEhiE INSULiTtOhl 
FROM RG'S/U COAX 



B 



COIiiKJCTM ilfSiOC TltQE 



1/2" COPflEB PIPE 



TEST POtNT •*• 



52A COAX 



INSERT SWB / 

METE*? HEBE-^ 




fO-23S COAX C»4Ji^l^ HECEPt^CLf 

Pt-aa* coAK ^1/6 



^ffj? AQJU^TABLE 5TUB 



Z*^ FIXED STUa 



fig* 9* Matching stub^ for 10-meter array. 



shown that best results on 
the 15-meter band are ob* 
tained with the two Vr inch 
tubes spaced 'iVi inches, 
center to center. This spac- 
ing corresponds to a surge 
impedance of about 360 
Ohms With a shorted stub 
45 inches long and spaced 



3Vi inches, the bandwidth 
of the LB-2 array is flat (1 to 
1 swr) from 21.050 MHz to 
21.400 MHz. At 21.0 MHz 
and 21.450 MHz, the swr is 
about 13 to 1 - The forward 
gam is virtually constant 
across the entire 15-meter 
band. With the array shown 



i 5£dB ^Alti 



in the photos, no antenna 
tuner or matching device Is 

used even with solid-state 
output circuitry in the 
transmitter. 

For the 10-meter array, 
the stub tubes are spaced 5 
inches apart, center to cen- 
ter Either of two stub types 
may be used. For the sim- 
plest possible adjustments, 



use the short stub with the 
fixediX>sition shorting bar. 
The 25 Vi -inch length is cor- 
rect for the center frequen- 
cy of 28.6 MHz. For a center 
frequency of 28.4 MHz, the 
stub should be made 26 
inches long. For a center fre- 
quency of 28 8 MHz, the 
stub length should be made 
24 inches long. With this 
stub, it is only necessary to 
carefully adjust the length 
of each half of the driven el- 
ement until a zero reflected- 
power indication is obtained 
at test point A or at any half- 
wave point along the trans- 
mission line away from the 
antenna. To maintain elec- 
trical balance in the array, 
each half of the driven ele- 
ment should be lengthened 
or shortened by the same 
amount. The electrical 
balance of the array can be 
checked by touching each 
end of the driven element, in 
turn, with a fingertip. The 
swr Indicator deflection 
from zero should be the 
same when touching either 
end of the element. The 
electrical balance of the 
parasitic elements can be 
checked in the same man- 
ner, tt will be found that the 
director-element tips are 



OiRECtlQII 



Zf'- 



1 






lO* T i/z" 



-7^ 



TIP* 
TfifSCOPE 




10' T i^- 



OfnVEfl ELEHEtiT 



-^ 



TIPS 
TELESCOPE 



42 \/r 



1/2* COPPER Tuae 



IMSlDC TUiC 



TEST POINT A 
INSERT SWR 
METER HERF 



SQ-2J^3 C04* RECEPTACUe 
PL-299 COfLX PLya 



^ta. COAX 

TO TRftMSMITTEff 




Fig. 10. 1 5-meter array. 

20 73 Magazine ■ May, 19S4 



Photo F. Bracing details. 




The Evolution of a Superior 
Terminal for RTTY and CW 






C64 



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Am-1 Past 

As an R & D project, the AIR-1 went smooth as 
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Choice of full or split-screen display with large 
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On screen tuning indicators mean you never 
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WRU, UNshift On Space, Word wrap-around. 
Test "Quick Brown Fox ' & * RYRY" in ROM. 
Break buffer, Random Code generator, Hand- 
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ilifCROLOG 

/NNOVATOWS m DlGtTAL COMMUNiCATtON 



i^Sl 




The optional on-board 4 mode AMTOR in- 
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Just load your program normally by hand, disc 
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very sensitive to any con- 
ductive object while the re- 
flector-element tips are rela- 
tively insensitive. 

The long-stub conductors 
are each 44 inches long and 
spaced 5 inches apart. The 
stub alone has an induc- 
tance value greater than 
that required to match the 
52"Ohm line to the balanced 
driven-element feedpoint. 
The inductance value can 
be reduced by shunting a 
100-pF airndielectric variable 
capacitor across the open 
end of the stub. In this appli- 
cation, the variable capaci- 
tor action is similar to that 
of an adjustable shorting 
bar, allowing the stub induc- 
tance to be adjusted as 
required 

To start the matching pro- 
cedure using the long stub, 
adjust the variable capaci- 
tor to about one-half maxl- 
mum capacitance (about 50 
pF). Adjust the driven- 
element length, tip to tip, to 
about 16 feet 5 inches. 



Make sure each half of the 
driven element is the same 
length. Connect the swr me- 
ter (bridge) in series with the 
520hm line at test point A 
or at any ha If -wave point 
along the line away from the 
array. To the transmitter end 
of the 520hm line, apply an 
unmodulated carrier of 28.6 
MHz and about a 5-Watt 
power level. Adjust the swr 
meter indicator for exactly 
full-scale indication in the 
forward selector-switch 
position Change the switch 
to indicate reflected power. 
Carefully adjust the length 
of each half of the driven el- 
ement until zero reflected 
power is indicated on the 
swr meter. After the array 
has been installed on the 
tower, the variable capaci- 
tor is adiusted to correct any 
detuning of the driven ele- 
ment when it is removed 
from the vicinity of the 
ground. The electrical bal- 
ance of thp array is checked 
as outlined above. ■ 



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22 73 Magazine * May, 1984 




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1 






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TYPE 


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813 


$ 42.50 


7843 


$ 90.95 


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67 15 


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425.00 


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83.50 


5867A 


157.25 


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29.75 


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83,50 


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229.50 


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110 50 


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35,70 


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80.75 


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377.50 


5893 


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63.75 


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102 25 


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485 


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603.50 


6399 


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2,15 


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204 00 


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5.60 ' 


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204.00 


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8,50 


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5.00 1 


4PR60A 


170,50 


6897 


136.00 


6GJ5A 


5-30 


4PR60B 


283 25 


6907 


67.15 


6GK6 


5-10 


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14875 


6922/6 DJ8 


4.25 


6HB5 


5.10 


4PR1000A/8189 


501 50 


6939 


18.75 


6HF5 


7.45 


4X1 50 A/7034 


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5.35 


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7117 


32,75 


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38,25 


7213 


255.00 


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6 15 


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350 00 


7214 


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430 


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114.75 


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23 50 


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28.90 


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5.95 


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53.00 


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72.25 


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7.65 


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42.50 


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2.10 


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7.55 


592/3-200A3 


179 50 


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8075 


12AT7 


3.00 


807 


7.25 


7735 


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24 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



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2N1561 


21.25 


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13.20 


MRF245 


30.30 


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1 1 .75 


MRF247 


30.30 


2N1562 


1999 


2N5646 


17.59 


MRF304 


36 95 


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21.25 


2N5651 


9.39 


MRF309 


28,75 


2N2857JAN 


3.49 


2N5691 


15.30 


MRF314 


24,25 


2N2857JANTX 


349 


2N6764 


22.95 


MflF315 


24.55 


2N2876 


11 49 


2ISI5836 


2,95 


MRF317 


54.35 


2 N 2947 


1560 


2N5842 


7.20 


MRF420 


17 00 


2N2948 


11 05 


2N5849 


17.00 


MRF421 


31.28 


2N2949 


13.19 


2N5913 


2J5 


MRF422A 


35 19 


2N2957 


132 


2N5916 


3060 


MRF427 


1465 


2N3375 


14.55 


2N5922 


8.50 


MRF428 


3910 


2N35S3 


1 32 


2N5923 


21 25 


MRF433 


1025 


2 N 3632 


13.19 


2N5941 


19 55 


MnF449A 


1075 


2N3733 


935 


2N5944 


8.80 


MRF450A 


12 20 


2N3818 


4.25 


2N5945 


9.80 


MRF453A 


1565 


•2N3866 


1.10 


2N5946 


12 25 


MRF454A 


17 10 


2N3868JAN 


1 87 


2N6080 


880 


MRF455A 


13 60 


2N3924 


285 


2N6081 


10,25 


MRF458 


17.60 


2N3927 


14.65 


2N6082 


10.75 


MRF463 


21.25 


2N3950 


21.25 


2N6083 


11,25 


MRF472 


0.85 


2N4012 


9.35 


2N6084 


12.75 


MRF475 


2.65 


2N4041 


1 1 ,90 


2N6094 


9,35 


MRF476 


1.70 


2 N 4072 


1 53 


2N6095 


10.20 


MRF477 


12.70 


2N4080 


3.85 


2N8096 


13.70 


MRF492 


19 55 


2N4127 


17.85 


2N6097 


17.60 


MRF502 


0,90 


2N4427 


1.10 


2N6105 


1 7.85 


MRF503 


5 10 


2N4428 


1.57 


2N6136 


18.55 


MRF504 


5,95 


2N4430 


10.03 


2N6166 


34 20 


MRF509 


4 25 


2N4957 


293 


2N6201 


42.50 


MRF511 


9 10 


2N49S9 


1 95 


2N6304 


1 35 


MRF515 


t 70 


2 N 5090 


11.73 


2N6459 


1530 


MRF517 


1 70 


2N510e 


2.93 


2N6567 


8.55 


MRF559 


1 75 


2N5109 


1.45 


2N6680 


68.00 


MRF605 


17 00 


2N5160 


2.95 


2N5942 


34.00 


MRF618 


21 25 


2N5177 


18.40 


MRF20S 


13.70 


MRF628 


735 


2N5179 


088 


MRF212 


13,70 


MRF629 


295 


2N5126 


47.60 


MRF223 


11,25 


MRF644 


23,45 


2N5583 


2-95 


MRF224 


13.15 


MRF646 


25.45 


2 N 5589 


8 30 


MRF231 


9.28 


MRF818 


12.75 


2N5590 


9,30 


MRF232 


10.25 


MRF823 


17,00 


2N5591 


11.75 


MRF233 


10.75 


MRF901 (3 LEADS) 


0,85 


2NS637 


13.20 


MRF237 


2.70 


MRF901 (4 LEADS) 


1 70 


2N5641 


10.55 


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11 75 


MPF904 


1.95 


2 N 5642 


11.95 


MRF239 


1465 


MRF911 


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vSef List ot Adrarlisers on page 1 74 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 25 



A Little Gem for QRP 

The T2FD antenna thinks ifs a full-size rhombic. 

Feeding is believing. 



W. Brmtofi Randolph W8VFT 
S95 Clifton Road 
Xenia OH 45MS 



While much has been 
written about anten- 
nas in general, tittle has 
been published about out- 
standing radiators for seri- 
ous QRP work. From reading 
some of the journals, one 
would think that QRP is il- 
legitimate unless transmit- 
ted from a dipole buried in 
the basement Since I do not 
subscribe to the premise 
that a second-rate antenna 
is required to operate QRP, I 



constructed a QRP version 
of W3HH's T2FD antenna. 
This little gem is a real per- 
former, and 1 would like to 
share with you the plans for 
its construction. 

For those not familiar 
with the antenna, a little 
history is in order. T2FD 
means terminated folded di- 
pole. This antenna reminds 
me of a folded*back termi- 
nated rhombic. The initial 
data appeared in Q5T in 
lune, 1949. The next article 
appeared in CQ in Novem- 
ber, 1951. CQ also published 
a book called Antenna 
Roundup in 1963. It con- 
tained two very informative 
articles on this antenna. 




The terminating-fesistof assembiY. 

26 73 Magazine • May» 1984 



I constnjcted one of these 

antennas prior to the Xenia, 
Ohio, tornado in April, 1974. 
I was using a custom-made 
high-power terminating re- 
sistor, and since it could not 
be replaced, I did not con- 
sider rebuilding this antenna 
after it was destroyed. By 
the time we moved to the 
country, I had forgotten 
how well this antenna per- 
formed. 

After moving to the coun- 
try, we installed a wind-pow- 
ered electric system, and 
QRP seemed very appropri- 
ate. After optimizing our 
electric system, I was not 
willing to operate with a sec- 
ond-rate antenna. 

After looking through sev- 
eral antenna books, I ran 
across my old friend T2FD. 
The terminating resistor has 
always been the difficult 
item to obtain. Since 1 want- 
ed to operate with five 
Watts, I figured it should be 
easy to parallel two-Watt 
carbon resistors for any val- 
ue I needed. This was the 
birth of my QRP T2FD, 

The antenna is configured 
as a sloping folded dipole. 
One end of the antenna is 
attached at an appropriate 
height on a tower or pole 
and the other end can be 
tied to a fence post or what 
have you. In the drawing, 
you wit! notice that it is fed 
with aOOOhm TV-type rib^ 



bon This antenna can be 
fed With other impedance 
lines, but it is beyond the 
scope of this article to cover 
all possible designs. If 300^ 
Ohm feed line is not accept- 
able, 1 would suggest you 
research the previously- 
mentioned articles for com- 
plete design information. I 
chose 30(K3hm feed line be- 
cause it was cheap and read- 
ily available. 

Constructing 

the Terminating Resistor 

For 30OOhm feedline, the 
terminating resistor is a rath- 
er critical 390 Ohms. It just 
so happens that ten 
3900-Ohm, two-Watt resis- 
tors in parallel will give us 
390 Ohms at a 20-Watt rat- 
ing. So far, so good. A 
1-1/8"inch hole saw will cut 
two circles in a piece of cir- 
cuit board faster than I can 
describe it These two cir- 
cles will form the end plates 
for a resistor cluster pack. 
Holes are drilled through 
the board so that three resis- 
tors are centered around the 
middle of the circle. Then 
the remaining seven resis- 
tors are equally distributed 
around the circumference. 
This procedure is repeated 
on the other end plate. 
When all the resistors are 
properly aligned with the 
copper side of the circuit 
board facing away from the 



-INSULATOR (7 J 

,^l/?m DOWEL nOD I ONE EACM tHOi 



■ i/4 in DOWet SOOS I EVtNLT SPACED ALOHfl tEPMlTH OF AliTENN* 

TO MAINTAIN SEPAI^AllQM > 
D«JLL MOLES TO ACC£PT AMTENMA Wlftt 



3» 0«1H HESlSTpft mOM 




Fig. 1. 80-meter version of the T2FD antenna. 



resistors, the assembly may 
be soldered, The result will 
be ten resistors wired in 
parallel 

This resistor pack will 
now have to be weather- 
proofed. The following ma- 
terials will be needed: one 
piece of PVC pipe 3 V2 "* long 
and 1 V4 " in diameter; two 
IVi" PVC end caps; two 
screw eyes with lock wash- 
ers and nuts; two large flat 
washers that will just fit 
inside the end caps; two 
nine-inch-long pieces of V* ** 
tinned braid; one tube of CE 
silicone rubber cement; and 
a small can of PVC pipe 
cement 

Drill a hole through the 
center of the pipe caps. Drill 
a second hole next to this 
center hole. This second 
hole is where the braid will 
come through. Thread the 
braid halfway through the 
second hole. Insert the eye- 
bolt through the center hole. 
Now put the large flat wash- 
er inside the pipe cap, brin^ 
ing the braid out around the 
inside. Slip on the lock 
washer and nut and tighten 
down the assembly. A little 
silicone rubber cement will 
waterproof the hole where 
the eyebolt and braid come 
through the end cap, Repeat 
the procedure for the other 
end cap and allow both ends 
to dry 

The next step is to trim 
the braid on the inside of the 
end caps to the shortest 
length that can be readily 
soldered to the copper foil 



of the resistor pack. Salder 
the braid of the other end 
cap to the other end of the 
resistor pack. Cement both 
ends of the PVC pipe liberal- 
ly and shove the assembly 
together. Allow it to dry 
while you work on the re- 
mainder of the antenna. 

Sticks and Stuff 

Since the antenna is for 80 
meters, the total length is a 
little over 90 feet Separa- 
tors must be used to keep 
the antenna aligned. Eight 
wooden dowel rods 3 feet 
long and V^ inch in diameter 
will fill the bill For the end 
separators, we will need two 
dowels 3 feet in length but 
Vi inch in diameter. Five 
small porcelain insulators 
will be needed, one for the 
center and two at each end. 
Plastic separators would be 
preferable but wooden dowel 
rods that have been soaked 
in oil will weather reason- 
ably well. 

The two sides of the di- 
pole must be separated by 2 
feet 10 inches. This makes ft 
easy using the 3-foot rods. 
Measure back one inch from 
each end and drill your 
holes. These holes should be 
drilled before the rods are 
soaked in oil. 

Bits and Pieces 

The assembly of the wire 
part of the antenna should 
be apparent from the draw- 
ing. The wire should be cut 
to the correct length each 
side of center, and the sepa- 



rators should be threaded 
on the wire. When this is 
completed, the center insu 
lator and terminating resis- 
tor can be installed. The 
braid coming through the 
end caps should be soldered 
to the antenna wire con- 
nected to the eyebolts. This 
will make a good electrical 
connection from the resistor 
pack to the antenna while 
the eyebolt will take the 
weight of the antenna off 
the internal resistors. The 
300-Ohm lead-in wire should 
now be soldered to the cen* 
ter insulator feedpoint 

We are now ready to pull 
the antenna up into posi- 
tion. It does not matter how 
the antenna is oriented with 
reference to the ground. It 
will probably lie horizontally. 
This is not important to its 
operation, but it should 
slope toward the ground at 
about a 30-degree angle. 
This antenna does not re- 
quire much real estate and 
should be popular with 
those living in the city. 




fig, Z 40-metef version of the 
T2FD antenna. 



awn 




Fig. 3. Erect the antenna so 
that the angle of tilt is from 
20 to 40 degrees for omnidi- 
rectional operation. 

Basic design information 
is included on the drawing in 
case you may want to scale 
down this 80- me ter version 
to 40 meters. If constructed 
as shown, this antenna will 
operate on all bands from 80 
through 10 meters, including 
the new 30-meter band. 

Feeding the Baby 

The T2FD is best fed with 
an antenna tuner Any bal- 
anced-out put tuner that will 
match 300 Ohms to 52 
Ohms should do fine. I am 
using a very uncomplicated 
home-brew tuner with excel- 
lent results. QRP can be very 
challenging and a lot of fun. 
This antenna will give good 
results with a minimum of 
space needed. Good luck, 
and ril be looking for you 
onQRPCW.B 



T2FD Basfc Design Data 

1. The length of each leg from the center is equal to 50,000 
divided by the lowest desired operating frequency (in kHz) and 
then muitlpffed by 3.28- The answer ts in feet. 

2. The spacing between radiating wires is equal to 30CX) divid- 
ed by the lowest desired operating frequency {In kHz) and 
then multiplied by 3.28. The answer Is In feet, 

3. The sloping angle for a nondlrectionaJ pattern should t>6 of 
the order of 30 degrees, 

4. The terminating resistor should t»e noninductive and have a 
rating equal to 35% of the transmitter input power. 



73 Magazine • May /1 984 27 



"The Tops of the Palm Trees 



ff 



20,000 QSOs. Coral Sea. Banyandah, 



Harry Mead VK2BIL 

PO Box 65, Round Cofner 

2158 NS.W., Ausuaim 



Within the compass of 
Oceania there are a 
few DX locations that are 
rarely visited because of 
sheer inaccessibility, and 
they rate highly on the most* 
wanted lists of amateurs 
around the world. Mellish 
Reef is in that category. It is 
an isolated volcanic peak 
rising a few meters above 
sea level from the depths of 



the Coral Sea, far removed 
from any shipping lanes and 
about 600 miles from any 
habitation— with the sole 
exception of the small 
weather crew on Wilt is 
Island, Few people have 
trod the coarse coral sand 
that hides the volcanic ash 
and supports vast numbers 
of gannets and frigate 
birds who annually nest and 
raise their young amongst its 
sparse vegetation. Nor can it 
be found on any but the 
most comprehensive maps 
since it has littie signifh 




The team on Willis Island, with Tony VK9ZH cento-. 

2S 73 Magazine • May. 1W4 



cance in any of man's ac- 
tivities. 

Discovered by the British 
survey vessel HMS Herald in 
1827 and charted for the ad- 
miralty, the major cay inside 
the lagoon was named 
Herald's Beacon. The minor 
cay about four miles north 
of it remains uncharted to 
this day, and it is probable 
that no human foot has ever 
been set upon its shores. 

The late John Martin 
VK3JW led ^n expedition of 
Australian amateurs there in 
1973, and I headed an inter- 
national group of amateurs 
in 1978 for a second postwar 
activation of the reef, but by 
late 1981, Meflish Reef had 
once more climbed into the 
top 50 of the world's most- 
wanted DX tocations. After 
our 1980 expedition to ZM7, 
Jack Binder KB7NW had 
gone down to New Zealand 
for a refit to his ketch Ban- 
yandah and was due to re- 
turn to Australia early in 
1982. We had been discuss- 
ing another DXpedition, and 
one to Mellish Reef was the 
logical choice after our 
hopes for a trip to the Ker- 
madecs had been frustrated. 



Jack and I held a weekly 

sked which now was taken 
up with detailed planning. 
First, we established a time 
slot for the operation: It had 
to be later than the hur- 
ricane season and early 
enough to take advantage 
of favorable winds. It was 
also important that we be 
there during or near the 
peak of the equinoctial prop- 
agation since the suns pot 
cycle was rapidly on the de- 
cline. The cyclones tradi- 
tionaiiy move north during 
April and it would be unlike- 
ly that we would have one in 
the Coral Sea after that date, 
but on the other hand the 
equinox was then five weeks 
past The favofable wind 
would continue for several 
months, so a compromise 
was made between the two 
former criteria and we set- 
tled on sailing from the 
mainland during the first 
week in May. Allowing for a 
three^lay stopover at Willis 
Island for some CW opera- 
tion, Jack calculated that 
the round trip could be ac- 
complished in three to four 
weeks. 

Our next task was to re- 



emit a crew to man the ex* 
pedition. There are many 
factors that influence the 
success or otherwise of an 
expeditioa but none nnore 
than the caliber of the team 
involved. In this respect it 
would be hard to find a bet- 
ter group that had all the 
vital elements necessary to 
achieve success. Franz Lang- 
ner D)9ZB with Bruce Johrv 
son VK3DHT would concerv 
trate on handling the phone 
section while Fernando Fer- 
nandez EA8AK and I would 
devote most of our oper- 
ating to CW. 

Once the team was estab- 
lished, the logistics were 
tackled and sponsorship 
sought Jack had purchased 
two Onan generators, two 
tents, and many of the vital 
supplies rn Hawaii prior to 
the Kingman Reef and Pal- 
myra Island expedition. 
They had been purchased 
after considerable debate as 
to the most suitable for use 
under extreme cor»ditions 
and had served well on KH5 
and ZM7. Rigs and antennas 
would come from our own 
resources. 

Like all other enterprises, 
inflation has affected the 
cost of DXpeditions. Major 
expeditions are becoming 
less and less viable; there- 
fore, a substantial donation 
from the North California 
DX Foundation was of great 
assistance to our venture. 
Nevertheless, the dream of a 
maior annual DXpedition 
has often gone under from 
the sheer weight of escalat- 
ing costs. 

We arranged to assemble 
in Sydney and drive up to 
Queensland to our point of 
departure, Fernando had 
left the Canary Islands early 
to visit the conventions at 
Fresno and Dayton and was 
the first to arrive in Sydney, 
followed by Bnjce a few 
hours later with Franz ar* 
riving the following morn- 
ing. Jack had taken Banyarh 
dab up to Bundaberg, and 
on our final sked before de- 
parture asked us to be 
alongside the dock around 



noon of the following day so 
that we could sail on that af- 
ternoon tide. He took on 
fuel, gasoline for the gener- 
ators, and fresh supplies as 
we drove north 1500 kms 
with 25 hours before sailing 
time (Bruce and I sharing the 
driving). We gave Franz and 
Fernando a memorable ride 
through some of Australia's 
outback and managed a 
few hours sleep just north of 
Brisbane at Caboolture, to 
arrive almost to the hour 
alongside Banyandah at 
Bundaberg. With the rigs 
and antennas stowed aboard, 
the auto was handed over 
to be stored in Brisbane 
awaiting our return With 
our personal gear stowed 
and steeping quarters allo- 
cated, we were ready to 
sail. 

Two hours later we were 
at the mouth of the river. As 
the sun began to set and the 
lights on tfie shore slowly 
dropped astem, with sail set 
and a stiffening breeze we 
headed out to the edge of 
the Barrier Reef and the 
open seas ahead. 

The morning of May 3rd 
saw us clear of the reef on a 
northeasterly course for 
Frederick Reef. Banyandah 
was making a steady seven 
knots in moderate seas, with 
whitecapped waves rolling 
along with us, an occasional 
porpoise rushing across our 
bows, and flying fish skim- 
ming across the troughs of 
the waves. With only a few 
puffy white clouds scudding 
across the sky, star sightings 
at night and sun shots during 
the day gave us continual 
navigation checks and con- 
firmed that we were making 
excellent time. 

Because of the whitecaps, 
we stood well clear of Sann- 
auriz Reef. We looked for 
the wreck which we had 
clearly seen on our previous 
trip, but as we could see the 
heavy breakers along the 
reef as we passed along its 
length we surmised that she 
had broken up and disap- 
peared in the intervening 
years. 




Franz DJ9ZB operating with the IS-52a 



On the third night we saw 
the loom of the unattended 
light on Frederick Reef and 
made a running fix as we 
passed; it would be our last 
terrestrial fix before we 
reached Mel I ish Reef. 

The fourth day out the 
winds slackened and by 

nightfall the sails were flap- 
ping idly in the soft breeze. 
Jack started the engines and 
took the sail in. With less 
than sixty miles to go, we 
felt a little disappointed that 
the wind had not held to see 
us right in, even though it 
would have made little dif- 
ference. The sun would 
need to be high in the sky to 
help us to see our way 
through the reef, and sailing 
or motoring, we had time in 
hand. 

At daybreak on May 7th, 
Jack waited for the sun to 



get high enough in the sky to 
get a fix and, having done 
so, climbed the mast, scan- 
ning the horizon for a sign of 
the r^ef. That we were not 
far away was evident by the 
large number of sea birds 
wheeling around. Another 
sun shot a recheck of the 
calculation, and we were 
certain that we were on the 
correct latitude. Were we 
east or west of our destina- 
tion? It was an even chance. 
We could not wait until 
nightfall to take star sights; a 
decision must be made. If it 
was wrong, we stood to lose 
a day; if it was correct, we 
would find the reef while the 
sun was high and we could 
go in. 

The birds appeared to be 
coming from the west If 
that were so, then the reef 
lay to the west. We turned 
westward and once more 




The author operating from the weather station on Willis 
island. 

73 Magazme • May, 1984 29 



Jack climbed the mast and 
scanned the horizon; in less 
than an hour he saw break- 
ers to the northwest about 
five miles away. A new 
course was set, hands were 
shaken, backs were slapped, 
and smiles wreathed our 
faces as we peered ahead 
waiting for the breakers to 
be visible from deck level 

Judith took the wheel; 
Jack once again climbed 
to the masthead and guid- 
ed Banyandah closer to 
the outer reef, carefully 
threading the ship between 
the jagged coral heads, 
black and menacing just 
below the surface, until we 
found the charted boat pas- 
sage inside the reef. The thin 
edge of white sand was now 
clearly visible, and slowly we 
inched Banyandah through 
the gaps in the coral heads, 
some of which were now 
just awash, waving their 
long fronds like cheerlead- 
ers at a ballgame. We stead- 
ily closed the distance be- 
tween Banyandah and the 
shore until, 300 yards out 
the coral heads surrounded 
us on three sides. Engines 
were stopped, the bow an- 
chor dropped, and we halt- 
ed. A stern anchor went 
down, the slack was taken 
up, and we had arrived. 

It was still before noon, so 
we had many hours of day- 
light left to get ashore and 
set up. Jack got the dinghy 
launched and the outboard 
fitted and he set off for the 
shore with Franz whilst 
Judith and the rest of the 
crew brought the rigs and 
equipment on deck. We fol- 
lowed closely our prear- 
ranged plan: I joined Franz 
ashore and we proceeded 
to assemble one of the 
beams. Fernando and Bruce 
followed and, with Jack, 
erected the first tent Very 
soon we were ready to put 
the first station on the air 
The generator started on the 
first pull; a quick check of 
the bands showed 15m and 
20m wide open, with a few 
signals evident on 10m- 1 
tuned up the 901 DM, called 

30 73 Magazine • May, 19&4 







3 



7?te operating site on Herald's Beacon, 



CQ on 14195, and was an- 
swered by VK2DJE; within a 
minute, a pileup had started, 
I handed over to Fernando, 
joined the others in getting 
the second antenna up, and 
we got Franz away on 21 
MHz. VK9ZR was away to a 
good start 

With everything squared 
away, Femando and Franz 
settled down to a steady 
rate of QSOs; Bruce, Jack, 
and t straightened our backs 
and took stock of the island. 
Jack and I were dismayed at 
the devastation of the island 
now compared to how it had 
been during our previous 
visit The cay had been 
swept recently by Cyclone 
Bemie and most of the har- 
dy foliage that had once 
spread thinly over the sur- 
face of the island had van* 
ished. So had most of the 
coral sand, leaving the frag- 
mented volcanic ash ex- 
posed, littered everywhere 
with dead and rotting car- 
casses of birds. We counted 
over 700 carcasses — proba- 
bly twice as many had been 
swept into the sea. Those 
birds which had survived 
were still distraught and 
startled and as the sun set 
and for long after, they 
wheeled and screamed over 
and around the ^land Hke a 
swarm of starlings scattered 
1^ a farmer^s gunshot 
Where prevk>usly it would 
have been difficult to pick a 
way between the nesting 
birds, only the occasional 
hermit crab disturbed the 



scene We were later to 

learn that wind velocities of 
180 mph had been recorded 
in the area as the cyclone 
passed through. 

The standby rig was set 
up in the sleeping tent and 
to enable the expedition to 
satisfy prior requests to join 
some of the DX nets, checks 
were run to see if two sta- 
tions running on the same 
band would cause any prob- 
lems. Using the 18AVT verti- 
cal, results were as we had 
found in the pre-expedition 
tests: no cross-modulation 
or breakthrough was experi- 
enced on either station that 
was sufficient to interrupt 
the QSO rate of any of the 
stations, and from that time 
on three stations were run- 
ning any time conditions 
allowed. 

We had agreed that the 
cardinal aim of the expedh 
tion would be that every am- 
ateur who wanted to work 
VK9ZR would have equal 
opportunity, and while the 
beams were tumed in the di- 
rection of optimum propa- 
gation, directional calls 
would be made only when 
the sheer size of the pileups 
made it impossible to do 
otherwise. An analysis of the 
1978 logs had shown which 
areas had lost out during 
that expedition, and all op- 
erators were alerted to keep 
a special ear for those areas. 
The only dead period, when 
no propagation was possible 
on any band, occurred be- 
tween 1600Z and 20002, 



and although a listening 
watch was maintained 
throughout those hours, on- 
ly a CW rag-chew with 
ZK1VU resulted. 

During our stay on Mel- 
lish Reef, Fernando had a 
bereavement in his family, 
and I would like to record 
our thanks to the operators, 
worldwide, who kept the 
channel clear while he was 
passing and receiving traffic 
back home. When the chips 
are down, the vast majority 
of amateurs prove that they 
are the gentlemen we as- 
sume them to be. 

By the second day, we 
had passed the 8000 QSO 
mark, equipment and gener- 
ators performed perfectly, 
the sun shone, and a swim in 
the lagoon was a welcome 
refresher My recollection of 
previous expeditions gave 
the impression that the pile- 
ups were bigger this time 
than I had previously experi- 
enced, but I could be wrong. 
Bruce, who was taking part 
in his first DXpedition, 
handled his share like a sea- 
soned DXer. 80^ and 40-meter 
propagation was not as good 
as we had hoped; the num- 
ber of QSOs on those bands 
was disappointingly low. 
Even so, every station we 
heard made a contact. 

On the third day, we re- 
ceived the news that weather 
conditions were deterio- 
rating; a number of dark 
clouds appeared in the sky, 
and in the evening freshen* 
ing winds blew down one of 
the beams. No damage was 
done and it was quickly re- 
erected. In the process, we 
discovered metal stakes 
buried in the sand that were 
from our 1978 expedition, 
and one of them served a 
second term of duty. 

We passed our target of 
15,000 QSOs on the fourth 
day and decided, in view of 
the rising winds and the 
knowledge that a cyclone 
was developing to the west 
of us, that we would close 
down on the following day. 
At daybreak we started to 
dismantle the sleeping tent 



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73 Magaiine • May, 1984 3t 



and gradually move the 
equipment back to Banyan- 
dah. As the day progressed 
we continued to pack up un- 
til only the vertical antenna, 
one generator and one rig 
remained. The pileup was 
still wide and deep as we 
waited for the last run from 
Banyahdab to take us off, A 
final QSO with WA6ZWE at 
0423Z, and the Mellish Reef 
1982 expedition was over. 
Back aboard, the gear was 
again stowed away secure- 
ly, anchors were weighed 
and Banyandah once more 
picked her way through cor- 
al heads towards the open 
sea. Almost one hour after 
our final QSO, Herald's Bea- 
con slipped below the hori- 
zon and we were setting 
course for Willis Island. 

The second leg of our 
Coral Sea DXpedition was to 
provide the excitement of 
the voyage, for whilst the 
trip to and the operation on 
Mel I is h Reef had gone ac- 
cording to plan and our best 
expectations were realized, 
the homeward leg via Willis 
Island was menaced by Cy- 
clone Domenic and the af- 
termath right up until we 
reached the lee of the Aus- 
tralian coast close to Cairns. 

The course to Willis 
Island from Mellish Reef 
took us close to Magdalene 
Reef from whence we set a 
course to approach Willis 
Island from the southeast 
To reach Willis in the fore- 
noon, Magdalene Reef had 
to be passed during the 
hours of darkness and spot- 
on navigation was essential. 
Many anxious hours had 
been spent on the previous 
expedition peering through 
the darkness for breakers on 
a moonless night whilst 
listening for a 2m signal 
from Bill VK9ZM on which 
we could take a bearing. 
This time we had no 2m sig- 
nal, but there was a waning 
moon . 

The winds had risen to 
almost 40 knots after we 
left Mellish, Banyandah was 
lively in the rising swell, and 
wet tails were the order of 

32 73 Magsiine * May, 1984 




The team: L to R, Fernando EA8AK, Franz DJ9ZB, Harry 
VK2B}L, Bruce VK3DHZ and jack KB7NW. 



the day as the lee rail dipped 
under and green seas swept 
into the cockpit. We were 
running under a reefed 
mainsail and peaking to 9 
knots; Cyclone Domenic was 
only 400 miles to the east 
of us and we were getting 
the edge of its fury: At 
that stage it was stationary 
and we anxiously waited to 
see which way it would 
move. 

We did not sight Magda- 
lene Reef, Jack calculated 
that we had passed it T2 
miles to our south when we 
altered course for Willis 
Island, and he took in more 
sail to make sure we did not 
njn down on the reef in the 
early hours of the moming. 
The weather crew had prom- 
ised to put on a navigation 
light at the top of their radio 
mast but we did not see it, 
and lack hove to until day- 
light before continuing on 
our course. 

It was around seven in the 
morning when we saw the 
tops of the palm trees on 
Willis Island, As we came 
closer, we saw heavy seas 
pounding on the reef and 
rolling into the lagoon, and 
as we moved round the is- 
land to find a lee shore in 
which to make our ap- 
proach, we could see the 
weather crew against the 
white building watching our 
progress as we cautiously 
approached the anchorage. 

Jack put down two an- 
chors for safety, unshipped 



the dinghy, and one by one 
we were transported ashore, 
Tony VK9ZH welcomed us 
on landing and introduced 
us to the rest of the weather- 
station crew: Arthur the 
skipper, Athot, and Jerry, 
We had brought mail and 
some urgently needed sup- 
plies, not the least of which 
was a replenishment of the 
beer and cigarette supplies 
for Jerry, who, in a moment 
of bravado, had quit smok- 
ing and consigned the re- 
mainder of his six-months 
supply to the ocean only to 
change his mind the fol- 
lowing morning. He had 
spent nearly two months 
regretting his action whilst 
he waited for our arrival. 

After a hearty breakfast 
we each indulged in the lux- 
ury of a hot shower (the first 
since leaving the mainland) 
before we were offered a 
space in the operations 
room to set up our station. 
The vertical was set up on 
the lawn outside the main 
building and the beam used 
by Tony was put at our dis- 
posal. I opened up on 20m 
CW at 231 6Z, several hours 
eariier than our anticipated 
arrival Our original plan 
had been to stay for 48 
hours, but the winds from 
Domenic remained steady 
at 40 knots and the seas 
were even heavier than 
when we arrived. The tops 
of the palm trees, bent over 
in the wind, conveyed the 
force of the gale. 



Conditions on the air had 
deteriorated, too. Propaga- 
tion to the east coast of the 
USA was poor on all bands, 
and to most of the USA it ■ 
was only moderately good, I 
There were a couple of short I 
openings to Japan on six me- 
ters and a few European 
contacts on 80m. We ex- 
plored the island while away 
from the rig, observing the 
birds nesting in the same 
manner we had expected to 
find on Mellish Reef, Willis 
Island is also a breeding 
ground of the large turtles, 
and the eggs that they had 
laid on the island were now 
hatching so that baby turtles 
were seen scuttling down to 
the ocean, so small that they 
nestled cozily in the palm of 
a hand. 

Good rains over the past 
six months had made the 
grasses and wild flowers 
lush and verdant and the 
buttons of the yellow and 
violet wild flowers formed 
garlands around the nests of 
the sea birds, with their eggs 
or chicks. They showed no 
fear of us as we quietly ob- 
served them in their habitat. 
The rains also had replen- 
ished the weather station's 
water supply and the stor- 
age tanks were fulL 

We were impressed by 
the mutine of the weather- 
station crew in their collec- 
tion of weather data and 
dedication to the mainte- 
nance of station buildings 
and environs; the remote- 
ness of their isolation was 
brought home even more 
when we saw by the visitors 
list that fewer than 70 peo- 
ple had called in the past 60 
years since the station was 
established! 

As the time of our sched- 
uled departure approached, 
we watched the weather 
pattern over the area, hop- 
ing for a change. Domenic 
appeared to be weakening 
and moving slowly away 
from us, but the winds still 
remained a steady 40 knots 
and the sea was still heavy 
enough to make the run out 
to Banyandah a hazard. 



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Added to this, the njn from 
Willis to the mainland was 
an obstacle course with 
more reefs and the narrow 
Grafton Passage through the 
Outer Barrier Reef. Flights 
out of Australia had already 
been booked, however, and 
Franz and Fernando would 
incur a heavy financial 
penalty if they were missed, 
adding to the burden of an 
already costly expedition. 
Naturally, they were anxious 
to leave according to 
schedule. 

Jack, aware of our predic- 
ament left the decision to 
us but nonetheless coun- 
selled caution and advised 
us to delay our departure by 
24 hours. Arthur, with his ac- 
cess to so much data, cor>- 
sulted the meteorological 
center in Townsville and 
added his weight to Jack's 
advice. A delay of 24 hours 
would still allow flight corh 
nections to be made, but 
there was no guarantee that 
the weather would improve; 

34 73 Msgazine • May, 1984 



it was at best a 50/50 

chance. We bowed to their 
superior wisdom and settled 
down to another day of op- 
erating. 

Banyandah had shifted 
anchorage several times 
during our stay when an- 
chors dragged or the shelter 
of the land proved inade- 
quate to the safety of the 
vessel. Once she lost an an- 
chor which had to be dived 
for the next day. 

When the sun rose on the 
moming of the 1 7th of May, 
the wind was still maintain- 
ing its velocity and we de- 
cided that we could delay 
no longer All the gear was 
carefully sealed in plastic 
bags and taken down to the 
beach The dinghy raced 
through the surf and was al™ 
most on end as it crashed 
through the crest of the 
breakers. Jack had insisted 
that we wear life jackets, so 
we were relieved when all of 
the crew and gear were safe- 
ly aboard Banyandah with- 



out damage or a dunking. It 
took most of the day before 
everything was stowed away 
and then, when we were 
ready to leave. Jack dis- 
covered a fouled anchor 
which required a further 
hour to clear from the coral 
shelf under which it had 
wedged. The sun was setting 
when we got underway, and 
with a farewell wave to the 
group watching us from the 
shore, we turned our bow 
away from the island and in- 
to the wild seas beyond. 

To clear the dangerous 
areas in daylight. Jack calcu- 
lated the speed we should 
make to come up to Swain 
Reefs during mid-morning, 
but the winds pushed us 
along well in excess of that 
requirement and the light 
sail was shortened still fur- 
ther to slow us down. Sleep 
was difficult but the 
securest way to be in those 
high seas was horizontally 
polarized in our bunks. 
Calmer seas brought us on 
deck soon after daybreak, 
however, and we were in the 
lee of Swain Reefs- Inside 
the line of breakers to our 
north and extending to the 
horizon, the coral heads 
loomed dark beneath the 
surface, picked out by the 
sandy bottom reflecting 
through emerald water. On 
our last trip, there had been 
a Taiwanese fishing boat 
high on the submerged cor- 
al, her bottom ripped out by 
the jagged spurs, but like the 
wreck on Samauriz, there 
was no trace of her either. 

In the calm lee of the reef 
we dropped anchor and had 
a hearty breakfast We had 
gained several hours on the 
run from Willis Island and 
the wind had still not 
abated. Weather reports 
were coming in that a 
change was on the way— 
that Cyclone Domenic had 
moved still further east and 
was dying out By delaying 
our departure from Swain 
Reefs for several hours, Ban- 
yandah would see the light* 
house on Euston Reef (mark- 
ing the southern side of the 



Gral^on Passage through the 
Barrier Reef) in the eariy 
moming of the 19th, 

Leaving Swain Reefs, we 
were now moving into the 
lanes of north- and south- 
bound shipping along the 
Australian coast standing 
well clear of the mighty 
Great Barrier Reef. Several 
ships were sighted as we 
continued our homeward 
leg and, as Jack had predict- 
ed, we sailed past the Graf- 
ton tight eariy in the mom- 
ing. We were awed by the 
fearsome seas that pound- 
ed over the reef, which 
stretched away to the south 
as far as the eye could see. 
We were six hours away 
from Cairns now; soon 
Green Island was cleariy 
visible on our starboard 
bow, and then came the 
outline of the coastal moun- 
tains and the channel lead- 
ing to Cairns harbor. The 
harbor master allocated us a 
berth alongside the main 
cargo quay; tines went 
ashore, and with Sanyandafi 
secured, we relaxed into an 
emotional scene of mutual 
congratulations. 

Several hours later we 
saw Franz and Fernando off 
to the airport; Ray VK2BKD 
was to meet them in Sydney 
and entertain them until 
their homew^ard flights. 
Bruce and I stayed on anoth- 
er day unloading the equip- 
ment and arranging its ship- 
ment down to Sydney, and 
the following day we flew 
down to Brisbane, collected 
our car, and began the long 
drive back to Sydney. A sack 
full of QSL cards had pre- 
ceded us, and now began 
the long task of checking 
logs and preparing a QSL 
card suitable to the occasion. 

Between Meltish Reef 
and Willis Island we had 
made over 20,000 QSOs to 
132 countries on all conti- 
nents, we had enjoyed the 
comradeship of a team of 
operators under difficult and 
hazardous conditions, and 
we resolved to undertake 
another expedition together 
sometime in the future ■ 




I J * ^t ■ J* -t 






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73 Magazine • May, 19S4 35 




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73 Magazine • May, 1^84 



lim Wek WBSBHt 
Radh Sys ferns Technohgy 
13281 Crass Valley Avenue 
Crass Vaiiey CA 95945 



How to Gain with PVC 

This could be history's cheapest quad 

Try water pipe on 2m. 



TO find out why I need a 
very portable, high-gain 
2-meter antenna, first you 
must understand a bit of 
both ancient and recent Cal- 
ifornia history. 



About 15 million years 
ago [an extremely short 
while, geologically speak- 
ing), the Earth groaned and 
shuddered; huge rock plates 
cracked together, and the 




Photo A, The author, with quad mour^ted on the jeep. 




spiny hills known as the Sier- 
ra Nevada started to rise 20 
to 30 thousand feet into the 
air. Huge volcanoes resulted 
from this immense pressure 
and uplifting, and these 
30,000-foot peaks belched 
smoke and lava, breaking 
themselves into smaller hills 
(like Ml Whitney, "only" 
14,000 feet high] and deep 
valleys, which in time be- 
came huge lakes. Lake la- 



hoe, 6000 feet high and un- 
known thousands of feet 
deep, is the result of one 
of these huge cindercones 
blowing its top and then col- 
lapsing back in upon itself, a 
classic case of a mountain 
lake surrounded by peaks 
many thousands of feet 
high. 

At about this time, Teha- 
ma, one of the minor vol- 
canoes of the range, also ex- 




Photo B. The quad in assembled form. 



Photo C The balun attached to the quad driven element 

73 Magazine * May J 984 37 




a V4' PVC "T* t9l 
B 3#4* PVC '»• (21 
C. SM' PVC Pl« (to" I 

& #iaAiiii lari.DnivEti 

JOrW 4 TO B U3lM« SHQftT 

i»iEct OF pwt i*ipc { t n.*ets * 



DETAIL 1 



DfVrvEN 



fig. 1(al PVC quad 



ploded, creating a second- 
ary volcano called Mt Las- 
sen, In the process, a deep 
lake surrounded by peaks, 
called Lake Al manor, was 
formed. Later, about a mil* 
lion or so years ago, an 
earthquake created a crack 
in the hills surrounding Al- 
manor. The escaping water 
created the Feather River 
and its deep canyon. 

Now for more recent his- 
tory. A couple of years ago, 
a local group of pilots decid- 
ed to hold a rather unique 
air race. Instead of merely 
the fastest being the best, 
this group decided to award 
a trophy to the airplane that 
hauled the biggest load on 
the least fuel the fastest 
They called this 400-mile 
race the "Competition for 
Aircraft Fuel Efficiency/' 
since shortened to the CAFE 
400. 

All of which brings us to 
the present day. One of the 
checkpoints in the race is an 
island in Lake Almanor, and 
the race folks wanted re- 
ports from At manor back to 
race headquarters In the So- 
noma Valley, some one hun- 
dred fifty miles away, pref- 
erabiy on 2 meters. In case 
you don't get the picture 
yet, let me paint it in vivid 
colors: Here 1 sit on an is- 
land in the middle of a lake, 
surrounded by hills 3 to 4 

38 73 Magazine • May, 1 984 



thousand feet high in every 
direction, with no ac power, 
no telephone, and a mission 
to communicate via 2 me- 
ters to another station 150 
miles away, which is further 
tucked into another valley 
blocked by another mourb 
tain range 4500 feet high! 

Fortunately, this deck has 
3 aces and I drew them all. 
First there is a little knoll on 
this island that will get me 
up 500 feet above the lake. 
Second, the Feather River 
Canyon, although only half 
a mile wide, is 3000 feet 
deep, 40 miles long, and 
pointed directly at Sonoma. 
Third, Sonoma has a 2-meter 
repeater on one of those 
4500-foot peaks just outside 
of town. 

And the ace up my sleeve 
(without which we would 
have lost the game) is my 
portable quad antenna. 50 
Watts and a vertical dipole 
bought us absolutely noth- 
ing, but with the quad anten- 
na described below, signals 
were Q5 both to and from 
the lake. See Photo A. 

There were some specifi- 
cations on this quad, 
though, that made it rather 
unique. First of all, the entire 
antenna and mast needed to 
be disassembled and packed 
into a bundle of sticks no 
longer than a meter and a 
quarter (48"X a size suitable 



T 



i/4' piPi 



I y^sM" cmjss 



I 

1 






4 

i 

=0 



3/4' COUPLER EVEWY 4i* DF MAST 



Fig. 1(b). PVC assembly. 



to 

TRAN£CElVEit 



—r' * 





PVC 
PiPE 



LONG 3CHEW 

SOLDER LUa 



DRIVEN ELEMENT 
(FEEDPOJNTI 



REFLECTQff 



fig, 2 feedpoint and balun detaii 



for backpacking (if neces- 
sary) a considerable dis- 
tance. Second, it needed to 
be put together in 15 min- 
utes or less. Third, of course, 
it needed to be cheap, 
cheap, cheap. See Photo E. 

I decided to make the en- 
tire antenna-supporting struc* 
ture from 2-cm (3/4"] polyvi- 
nyfchloride (PVC) water pipe 
and fittings. Photo B shows 
the general construction 
details, and Figs, 1 and 2 
show construction details of 
the quad, In working with 
PVC fittings, I found that the 
fittings were all tapered, 
with the result that if the 
pipe was inserted firmly into 
the fitting, the assembly was 
rigid enough to stay togeth- 
er without the use of pins, 
glue, or keepers of any sort. 
Furthermore, the joint so 
made is rotatable with a bit 
of elbow grease. This allows 
the quad to go from hori- 
zontal to vertical polariza- 
tion (and anywhere in be- 
^een to allow for polariza- 
tion-rotation bounce off the 



canyon walls) in a few sec* 
onds time. 

For those of you who have 
never done any aviation an* 
tenna work, the balun 
shown in Photo C and Fig. 2 
may appear strange. Note 
that the center conductor of 
the coax does not attach to 
anything at the antenna end, 
and that the antenna is con- 
nected to only the shield 
braid of the coax. The loss, 
though, is about 0.1 dB, the 
balance is near perfect, and 
the transfomnation ratio is 
1:1. (Note also that this 
scheme grounds both ele- 
ments when this balun is 
used on a dipole — affording 
cheap and automatic light- 
ning protection.) The balun 
fastens to the quad element 
by means of solder lugs. 
Photo D also shows that the 
balun is firmly laced to the 
PVC frame; if the balun is 
not supported, the coax 
braid will break at the solder 
lugs. 

The quad elements them- 
selves are AWC 18 wire. 




Photo D. A doseup of the balun attach point. 



There is nothing sacred 
about this size; my company 
uses rolls and rolls of the 
stuff, so I got it off the sheff . 
AWC 18 gave us a 1.5:1 vswr 
bandwidth of about 3 MHz. 
If you need more band- 
width, use heavier wire. 

The proof of any antenna 
is its gain. While I have not 
been able to sniggle any free 



time on the company anten- 
na range for this product, a 
bit of field testing using a 
calibrated Kenwood TR-7400 
shows the gain of this quad 
to be between 6 and 8 dB 
above a reference dipole. 
The most repeatable mea- 
surement indicates a gain of 
6.5 dBd There are many nar- 
row, deep nulls on the back- 



Photo £. The quad disassembled into a box of fittings and a 
pack of sticks. 



side of the quad, so that a 
true front*back ratio is hard 
to define, I can comment 
that a machine in Reno that 
was giving me fits at Al man- 
or completely disappeared 
into a null that was mea- 
sured later in excess of 30 
da. The main beam is fairly 
wide; eyeball measurements 



show the 3hJB forward 
beamwidth to be about 30 
degrees wide. 

Many thanks to Ron 
N6AUB and Crover KC7IW 
for their help in field testing. 
Also many thanks to the 
ghost of Mt Tehama, whose 
explosion created the need 
for this antenna. 



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73 Magazine * f^lay, 1984 39 



Franch K Kdson KIKSV 

Box 275, Genera/ Oe/ivery Servfce 

APO San Francisco CA 96Jm 



Helicoids 



few people understand bow to build tbese versatile wbips. 
This article takes care of all the ifs, ends, and butts. 



When first employed 
as a tech rep, I found 
myself on the move quite of- 
ten and had a definite need 
for a portable antenna. I fig- 
ured that 1 ccaild kill two 
birds with one stone and rig 
up something that I could 
use in both my job and my 
hobby, amateur radio. 

Sometime in the past ' ex- 
perimented with a ground- 
plane antenna utilizing ex- 
pandable and retractable 
whips which when simpiy 
adjusted to the correct 
lengths permitted operation 
on the frequency of choice. 
Some of you ex*bush mon- 
keys from Southeast Asia 
ought to remember the 
292 ground-plane antenna— 
a beast to log around the 



boonies. Welf, at the time, I 
was trying to come up with a 
smaller package. 

In any case, with that old 
idea in mind, 1 decided to try 
out the same principle in 
conjunction with helicoidal- 
type antennas. The main 
problem was in obtaining a 
quick disconnect to join the 
heli form to the whips. 

After much fooling around 
and wasted effort, I decided 
to use the UHF-type connec- 
tors with a barrel in the heli 
forms and a PL-259/U-type 
connector on the whip. This 
called for a much larger heli 
form which resulted in the 
antenna being able to han- 
dle SOO Watts or more for 
power with the connectors 




providing a good solid rf 
connection- 
All in all, it resulted in an 
antenna that was capable of 
being used on 21 MHz 
through 30 MHz with a 500- 
Watt capability. With the 
heli form being the largest 
element in the package 
(25 Vi inches), the antenna 
was what ( called suitcase 
compatible. 

Basic Fundainefitals 

The use of expandable 
and retractable whips as ca- 



pacitance hats helps prove 
the saying that every little 
bit helps, The elements also 
radiate and by virtue of their 
length provide more cap- 
ture area for the received 
signal 

According to the formula 
for resonance, the frequerh 
cy is inversely proportional 
to the square root of either 
L or C; changing either one 
would result in a frequency 
shift. If an inductance value 
could be found that was 
compatible with the capaci- 



i/< DIAU 



HELlCOiD roRit \ r 

T/t" P*AM IT \ :SUTT 
.Z*'l It. 




AWILE BRACKET 
I* * I «/*• 



Fig. 1. Both helicoids mounted within the PVC pipe mount. 
The two wing nuts are used for mounting to the phenolic 
mast mount 



too MOUMTED 
W/e/JS" SELF-T1PPJ1«G 
SHEtT mETAL SCHEIE 



i;AfllRCl C&**tECTXm 



UJ6 nouHteo-^ 
s<:he»s «iK* 




Harada whips joined with the UG-273/U connectors. 

40 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



Fig. 2 The tip and end of the heticoid with the barrel and butt 
epoxied in place. 



tance value of the whips, 
then tuning over a specified 
range of frequencies would 
be possible. 

Armed with that basic re- 
search, a suitable induction 
value was determined by 
empirical design and found 
to be compatible wrth the 
formulas for induction and 
the number of tums for a 
closely-wound coil. 

With this, I now had a 
base frequency to start with. 
Simply expanding or retract- 
ing the whip elements should 
permit me to tune up to the 
next highest frequency; a 
grid-dtp meter told me my 
base frequency was 21 MHz 
and (much to my surprise 
and delight) informed me 
that I could tune on up 
through 30 MHz 

In any case, before you 
start construction, let's be 
realistic: This antenna is not 
going to compete with any 
beam or dipole 100 feet up 
in the air, although I have 
given some reasonable corrv 
petition (by logging in 48 
countries with these anterv 
nas). There is one thing tin at is 
certain: You will be able to 
get a good signal out in what I 
term a hostile environment 

You will need two sets of 
whips; I purchased mine 
from Harada Industries of 
America for $3-95 each. 




Antenna used as a vertical witb the ground side of the helkoid replaced with a radial 



They are perfect for this ap- 
plication in that they are sol- 
idly constructed, are of 
stainless material, and ex- 
pand out to approximately 
SOVi inches. The model num- 
ber is ST-13 (3TS-1300F] and 
they are available at most 
auto supply houses. 

E needed two additional 
sets of whips for the 28- 
MHz-through-30-MHz band, 
as I didn't want to cut the 
Haradas — their full length 
was needed when using the 
antenna in the vertical con- 
figuration. So I used two 
sets of the conventional 
type used for FM radio (con- 
srsting of three sections, 
each section 7% inches 
long); these are good as they 
make good electrical con- 
nections when expanded 
and shortened and give you 
the frequencies needed if 
you are concerned with any 
commercial activities- In 
any case, I picked up a cou- 



ple of them in a shopping 
mall for two bucks. 

Assembly 

Take the two barrel con- 
nectors prepared as in Fig. 2 
and mount a terminal lug 
over the 6/32-inch hole; 
tighten down with a metal 
screw. Do the same thing 
with the brass butts. 

Obtain the two helicoid 
forms (7/a-inch diameter x 
24 inches long); insert the 
barrel connectors into the 
form right up to the lug Us- 
ing 5-minute epoxy, seal the 
connectors to the form; re- 
peat with the butts, making 
sure that their 14 -inch hole is 
left on the outside. 

If the butts and connec- 
tors do not conform to the 
inner diameter of your form, 
you may have to file the 
connectors down or wedge 
them in place. Make sure 
that you have good solid 
straight connections. 



Measure down from the 
lip of the form on the barrel 
connector side 4-3/8 inches 
and scribe a mark; this will 
be the beginning of the load- 
ing coil winding which is 
simply an extension of the 
helicoid wire. 

Take 133 inches of #20 
enameled wire and solder 
one end to one of the butts. 
Begin your winding right on 
the edge of the form, main- 
taining a Vj-inch pitch wind- 
ing for 16 turns and then a 
W-inch winding pitch until 
you reach the loading coil 
mark. 

At this point I suggest 
taping the winding to keep it 
in place. Start winding 7 
tums close-wound as tightly 
as possible; on the last turn, 
I would again use tape to 
maintain the coils' integrity. 
Continue the windings up 
the rest of the form with 
Vi-inch spacing and solder 
in place. 




PVC pipe with helicoids mounted on either side. Note hole 
used for tilted dipote. 




Matching coil mounted on the butt bolts. 

73 Magazine * May, 1984 41 



mi 



1.5 I 



14.1 



1.1; I 



It I 



IIJ 




2IMNI 


025 


QiO 


076 


lOO 


24 flMHi 


OfSO 


100 


J50 


zoo 


aewiNi 


050 


roo 


i^O 


too 


29SMNI 


560 


fiDO 


g&o 


700 



f /g 3. Swr curve for antenna used in the d'lpote configuration 
and set up 75 feet above ground Refer to (he text for whip 
/engtfts. 



You will have to do exact- 
ly the same thing with the 
second heli form, taking 
care that the winding fol- 
lows the sanne axis as the 
winding of the first fomi [see 
Fig. 1). 

At this time, 1 had to pre- 
pare the UG-273/U connec- 
tors, 4 for each of the whips. 
1 had to break away and 
remove the plastic that was 
around the center pin to en- 
sure that when I filled the 
BNC side with solder, the 
center pin would be shorted 
to the main or ground side 
of the connector's housing. 

You should at this time 
make sure that the inside of 
the BNC side of the UHF 
connector is completely 
clean, as well as the end of 
the whip which will be in- 
serted into it Fill the BNC 
side with hot solder and in- 
sert the whip end into it 
making sure that you have a 
good straight connection. 
When it is cooled, check 
with an ohmmeter and 



make sure that the whip, the 
main housing of the connec- 
tor, and the center pin are 
one connection, as this will 
mate with the barrel con* 
nector on the heticoid form. 

When I was trying to 
match up the 50Ohm coax 
with the heli dipole, I ex- 
perienced some problems. 
At first I simply hooked the 
coax directly to the dipole; 
this would have worked, but 
I was not entirely satisfied 
with the swr I then went to a 
7*tum coil shunted directly 
across the two bolts that 
held the helicoids to the 
mast plate. This brought me 
into an acceptable range, 
but when I put the swr meter 
directly into the antenna. 
my swr was something other 
than what it should have 
been. Back to the drawing 
board. 

I finally ended up with a 
coil With the exact same di- 
mensions as the helicoid; in 
fact I used a leftover piece 
from it The form is 1 inch 
long. Approximately 1/8 




Barrel connector niounted on the end of the heticoid, 

42 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



inch in from each end, I 
drilled a 3/32-inch-diameter 
hole. 1 then wound 4 turns of 
#20 enameled wire (same 
that is used on the heli form) 
and left 2*inch pigtails. (Be- 
fore I forget the windings 
ajie spaced 1/8 inch apart; 
the two pigtails are then ter- 
minated with V4-inch spade 
lugs and the whole affair is 
smeared with 5-minute 
epoxy to keep the coils in 
place and give protection 
from the elements.) This 
brought the swr at the anten- 
na input practically down to 
a flat response wrth good 
power output also, the coil 
seems to alleviate some- 
what the problems of near- 
by objects having an effect 
on resonance* 

I used a phenolic plate for 
my mast mount. I took a 
piece 3Vi inches wide by 8 
inches long by V4 inch in 
thickness. Two inches in 
from one end. I drilled two 
holes to match the two bolts 
that come out of the PVC 
pipe mount When the plate 
is mounted over the bolts, it 
makes an ideal place in 
which to mount the coil. 
About 3 inches down from 
that I drilled two more 
holes for the single U-bolt 
that would hold the whole 
affair to some kind of mast 

Last but not least was the 
PVC pipe mount to hold the 
helicoid forms. 1 experi- 
enced some problems with 
this because with the wire 
on the heli forms there was 
not sufficient room to insert 
them into the pipe. I simply 
took a rasp file and filed 
down the inner diameter on 
each side of the pipe to pro- 
vide a secure fit for the heli 
forms* When you drill the 
two 2*inch-s paced holes in 
the pipe, make sure that 
they are exactly parallel so 
as to properly align the butts 
of the heli. 

Take one heli form and in- 
sert it into the PVC pipe, 
aligning the butt hole with 
the hole in the pipe. Take 
the SO-239 mounted on the 
bracket and insert the ^/i-inch 
bolt through it into the PVC 
pipe, on through the butt 



and out the other side of the 
pipe. Tighten it down with a 

nut and mount the other heli 
form on the other side in the 
same manner Solder a 2Hnch 
piece of #20 wire to the 
center pin of the SO-239 and 
terminate the wire with a 
W-inch spade lug. Take the 
tug and insert it beneath the 
second heli bolt and tighten 
it down. This completes the 
construction of the antenna. 

1 would recommend tap- 
ping the botes for the butts. I 
didn't have any taps avail- 
able at the time and I force* 
fitted the bolts through the 
brass butts, making my own 
threads with little difficulty. 

At this point you should 
have the phenolic plate 
mounted and the coil se- 
cured with the two wing 
nuts; connect the two Hara- 
da whips to the ends of the 
helicoid. 

Testing 

We will not refer to the 
first section of the whip for 
adfustments— only the 2nd 
and the tip "end." 

Connect the RG-8/U mini 
coax; I used 32 feet because 
that was all 1 had left and I 
found it sufficient for my 
needs. 

Adjust the 2nd section for 
9Vi inches, the tip extended. 
You can start your checking 
at a height of 5 feet or 15 
feet whichever is practical 
for you. 

Apply just enough power 
from the transmitter to 
establish an swr ratio, it 
should be rather small. Ap- 
ply power and the swr 
should approximate the one 
in Fig. 3, I used 100 Watts in- 
to the antenna. If the swr 
isn't satisfactory, check the 
dial of the transmitter and 
test at a high and low end to 
determine the whip length. 

For instance, if your swr is 
minimum at 300 kHz and 
you want say 50 kHz, ex- 
tend the whip length about 
one inch at a time and re- 
check. I used high-voltage 
fuse pullers 16 inches long. 
With a companion for safety 
and much reduced power, I 
simply adjusted right in for 



Ham MasterTopes 



THE N2NY HAM RADIO COURSE ON VIDEOTAPE 



< 1963 N?WV PTQduClidr»% iiK 




©HVIP 



Ham MasterTapes brings the best 
possible personalized Ham Radio 
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living room. If you, a friend or family 
member wants the best help available to 
get past the FCC test hurdle, it's 
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video format. 

Larry Home, N2NY brings his 33 
years of Ham Radio teaching experience 
right to your home. Each of the 26 video 
lessons has close-up details of com- 
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graphic drawings. Each lesson has 
important points superimposed over the 
action and reviewed at the end of each 
section- This makes note-taking a snap! 
Miss something? Didn*t get it the first 
time? Just back up the tape and run it 
again or freezeframe it for detailed 
close-up study! 

Larry's classroom is a real ham shack, 
Lee, a 13-year old boy, and Virginia are 
led through the learning process. The 
questions that they ask are the ones 
Larry knows you would ask if you were 
there in person. You soon feel like you're 
part of an ideal small class. 

The topics covered will not only get 
you through the Novice test — General 
class theory is covered also. By the time 
you get your Novice license, you will be 
able to upgrade to General or 
Technician! 

Larry's technique of involving the 
viewer with the demonstrations makes 





©m 





the most difficult topics easy to un- 
derstand. Understanding— not mere 
memorization — is what makes Ham 
MasterTapes so effective. When you 
study the 700 possible FCC questions, 
the answers will be obvious. 

Larry doesn*t stop with just test- 
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operating practices and courtesy are 
demonstrated. The instruction manual 
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become your own personal instructor 
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contact! 

The Ham MasterTapes series is 
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The 6- hour course is available on three 
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.^271 



Ham MasterTapes 



THE K2ffY HAM RADIO COURSE ON VIDEOTAPE 



136 East 31st Street 

New York. New York 10016 

(212)685-7844 •673-0680 



igei N^N'^F'OdyCI'OJi'* u- 



SOME OF THE 
TOPICS 
COVERED INCLUDE 



DOUBLE SlDEBAiiD 
SINGLE SIDEHAJm 
fRZOtTENCr MODUIATION 
PHA2C HODUULTttm 
SIDrBANOS 

ban:;wii3th limits 
envelope 

I>£VIATI{Ht 

CVE»«ISULATIQM 

SCATTER 

FUEOUENCTf TRMlSUiTtOH 

AMTEKNAS ANS FEEDLINES 

YAGI AUTEmtAE 

QUAD AWTEKNAS 

POLARIZATION 

FEEDPOIMT IMPEDANCE 

KALF-WAVE D I POLE 

QQAHTEH-WAVE VEHTICAL 

SADlhTlQH PATTEHNS 

DlftECtlVlTY 

MAJOR LOBE5 

CHARACTEI?ISTIC IKPECAHCl 

STAKDI.^ WAVES 

AtTEKUATIOH 

AITTENKA-FEEOIIIG KI5HATCK 

STATION ID 

CALL aiGNS 

UJOantG ft£C]UlREHEMTS 

PONCft LHHTATiaW 

COMTHOL OP REQtJXHEM^T^ 

E-S-T aEPQRnNG STfSTE« 

TELEdRAJ*t!Y SPEED 

ZESO-BELATING SIGNAL 

TRANSMITTEfi TUWE-OP 

TELEGRAPHY ABBREVIATIONS 

RADIO t^AVE PKOPAGATJON 

SKY WAVE WiD SKIP 

GHOUPm KAVE 

HAHMOEVIC £^ETEPFERENCE 

SHR itEADINGS 

SIGKALS AND EHlSSlOMS 

BACK WAVE 

KCY CLICRS^'CHZBFS 

sopEm igosEP mm 

SPURIOUS EKH^IOKS 

COMPUTERS 

OSCAR 

ATV-SSTV 

OPLHATIJ^ COOHTEST 
RULES AK& ftEGULATlONS 
OPERATING PROCECITKES 
RAUIO WAVE PROPAGATION 
AJiATEUH HAD 10 PRACTICE 
ELECTRICAL PRINCIPLES 
CIRCUIT COMPOJ^ENTS 
PRACTICAL CIRCUITS 
SIGNALS AND EMISSIONS 
RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION 
EHEROENCY COHHUN I CATIONS 
TRAKSMITTEB POWER L 1*1 ITS 
STATIOW^IB REQCTSEM£:JTS 
THIED-PAHTY PARTICIPATIOH 
FBEOU^tCY fiAIUSS 
StLE!CTltm or FR£QI7E2^I£5 
H.C* MODEIpS 
FBffiirilTtI} |>HJICT3CES 
EAfl 1 OTELEPHONY 
RADIO TELEPRIMTIMG 
PEPEATERS 

VOX TRANSMITTER COWTROL 
BREAK- IN TELEGRAPHY 
A^VTENNA ORIENTATION 
INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION 
EMERGENCY- PREP PRILLS 
rONOSPHEftlC LAYERS D-E-F 
MAXIMUM USEABLE FREQCTENCY 
IONOSPHERIC DISTURBAXCES 
SUNS POTS 
SCATTER «r DUCTIM; 

LINE-OF-SICirr 

TROPOSPHEHIC BENDItW 
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS 

TaAKSHlTTES PEHf OflMANCE 

tmN-TONt TEST 

WEUTRALIZIJJC AMPLIFIERS 

POKES ?<£ASimEMEJT 

TEST EQUIPHENT 

05CrLL0SC0P£5 

MCJLTIXETEHS 

SIGJ.AL CENERATOfiS 

SIGNAL TRACERS 

AUDIO RECTIFICATION 

HEFLECTOMETEHS - SWR 

SPEECH PROCESSORS 

ANTENNA-TUNING UNITS 

S'METERS 

WATTMETERS 

IMPEOAJiECE 

RESISTANCE 

REACTA.NCE 

IHDUCTAN'CE 

CAPACITANCE 

IMPECAI^CE WATCH IJ*G 

Olt?f*S LAW 

a;:ps ksij> volts dividers 

POWEJt CALCULATIOfVS 
SERIES AHD PARALLEL 
FXLTEilS 



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fig. 4. Swr curve for one sect/on used as a vertical. Readings 
were taken at a height of 10 feet Refer to the text for whip 
and radial lengths. 



minimum swr. I wouldn't 
use this method unless 
highly-trained personnel who 
know how to react in the 
event of an emergency are 
present 

For the 24.5-MHz band, 
adjust the whip's 2nd sec- 
tion to 3 Inches and the tip 
to 7Vz inches; apply the 
same technique. 

For 2S MHz on up, use the 
FM whips On 28 MHz. the 
whip is adjusted for a total 
length of 19 Vi inches, using 
each section. 

For 29,5 MHz. adjust the 
whip for a length of 1 5 inches. 

Testing for the 
Vertical Mode 

If you say that you don't 
have enough room to get a 
heli dipoie up in the air, how 
about a short vertical with 
one radial ("Great shades of 
Marconi!"), perhaps mount- 
ed on a camera tripod about 
3 or 4 feet high, in the living 



room, out in the yard, or per- 
haps up in the air about 40 
feet? 

Well, just remove one heli 
form from the ground side 
and make sure to replace 
the bracket with connector, 
bolt ^nd wing nut which 
will be used to secure the 
radial 

Hook up the RC-59/U 
coax (I used 50 feet) and 
don't forget one Harada 
whip extended all the way. 
Connect one radial [10 feet 
long, about #14 vinyl- 
jacketed wire) to the wing 
nut and apply power at 21 
MHz. Your swr should ap- 
proximate the one in Fig. 4, 
Just let the radial do its 
thing, lying along the ground 
or hanging beside the mast 
tf you find that adjustment 
is necessary, adjust the 
radial about V* inch at a 
clip, but tried and proven 
events dictate that this 
shouldn't be necessary. 




Brass butt mounted in the helicofd form. Note the threaded 
hole for rf connector with a V4~inch bolt 

44 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



On the 24,5-MHz band, 
adjust the Harada 2nd sec- 
tion to 6 inches, the tip to 
JVi inches, and the radial to 
9 feet 6-3/8 inches. 

For 28 MHz through 29.5 
MHz, adjust the tip only to 6 
inches and the radial for 7 
feet '^3 inch. 

You may want to do as I 
have done and make up 
some stubs with phone jacks 
so that removing one stub 
will permit resonance on the 
next highest frequency. This 
alleviates the problem of 
carrying around a complete 
set of radials. 

A good swr meter and a 
noise bridge are really essen- 
tial for testing. This corn- 
pletes the test for the ver- 
tical mode 

Conclusion 

You shouldn't experience 
any difficulty in. obtaining 
resonance with this antenna. 
I primarily set up all paranrv 
eters in the low ends of the 
bands so that there is ample 
adjustment left to permit 
operation in your favorite 
portion of the band. 

The swr is sufficiently low 
so that if I feel like working 
some SSB, I leave my little 
Kenwood AT 130 antenna 
tuner in the line and just 
touch up a little bit leaving 
a complete flat response. 

It is a fun antenna to work 
with, especially when there 
are lO-meter band openings. 
1 also found it useful for in- 
structional purposes. Being 
compact it lends itself to a 
classroom nicety; a student 
can have hands-on applica- 
tion in adjusting for reso- 
nance, observing swr power 
relationships, and even trim- 
ming the radials. 

Most of the parts used in 
the construction may be sub- 
stituted for, such as the ma- 
teria! for the heli form, the 
PVC pipe mount and the 
coax connectors. You even 
may want to operate in just 
one favorite portion of your 
ideal band. If so, you may 
replace the whips with 
something more permanent 
such as a piece of brass 
welding rod or a section of 



moDile whip antenna. You 
then will just have to find 
the correct resonant length 
for that band. 

I have heard a lot of pros 
and cons with regard to 
short antennas, ground 
losses, crunching effect etc. 
But I for one have had a lot 
of fun pursuing my hobby 
where otherwise I may not 
have been able to do so, 

I would like to make one 
last comment on the design: 
The loading coil that I se- 
lected is at best a compro- 
mise. I could have selected 
a coil for each band and 
made the swr as tight as a 
drum, but this would have 
entailed changing coils for 
each band; accomplishing 
this in the evening, perhaps 
in the dark, would present 
problems (dropping a nut 
coil, etc.). Changing a whip 
presented no problem as to 
selecting the proper length, 
especially if the elements 
are grooved so one can 
touchrsense the correct 
length for the desired band. 
In any event at this time the 
swr is sufficient for typical 
operation. 

Anyway, some of you an- 
tenna buffs should be get- 
ting some ideas about a 
compact beam, maybe a re- 
flector 5% longer with extra 
optimized spacing. Who 
knows, it may work. 

For you apartment dwell* 
ers. you may want to hang 
the vertical out over the 
balustrade and put a flag on 
the end of it 

The most classical ap- 
proach 1 have ever seen was 
undertaken by a friend of 
mine. He took one of my 
verticals and had it mount- 
ed inside a 2-inch-diameter- 
by-30-foot piece of PVC 
pipe; he then mounted a 
coax connector at the base 
and just let the radial hang 
witiiin the pipe. To top 
things off (as the old saying 
goes), he then constructed a 
model TV antenna, spray- 
painted it with silver paint 
and mounted it on top of the 
pipe to justify the pipe's 
presence. With that t'H have 
to say good tuck and 73. ■ 



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73 Magazine • May, t984 4S 



lack Celst N3BBK 
1205 Henderson AvGfiue 
SUver Spring MD 2Q902 



The Big-Car Break-Down Beam 

Try two-meter luxury the easy way. 



Involvement with the lo- 
cal RACE 5/ ARES organi- 
zation (the Radio Amateur 
Civil Emergency Service/Anrv 
ateur Radio Emergency Ser- 
vice) prompted a search for 
a quick-setup beam antenna 
to enhance two-meter com- 
munications when operating 
from a vehicle at a fixed lo- 
cation. This article descrit>es 
the beam, mast, and guying 
that 1 came up with. The as- 
sembly is called "The Four- 
Minute Beam ' because it 
can be set up by one person 
in less than four minutes. 
For two people working 
together, if s a piece of cake. 

The beam selected was a 
Cushcraft A147-4, a four^ele- 
ment yagi with a boom 
length of 44" and a weight 



of only two pounds. The de- 
sign of this model is ideally 
suited for the application. It 
was necessary only to re- 
place the hex nuts with wing 
nuts to make it a knock- 
down, quick-assembly beam 
and add a stack of spacing 
washers to allow the mount- 
ing U-bolt to be pulled up 
snugly around the small di- 
ameter mast The disassem* 
bled beam is stowed in the 
original shipping carton 
modified to become a stor- 
age box. 

The twelve-foot mast is 
made up of four pieces of 
telescoping .058 "-wall alu- 
minum tubing. The largest is 
1-1/8" in diameter, and the 
longest piece is cut to a 
length of 56 Vi". The four 



Photos by Jim King WS3JZI 




pieces telescoped are then 
stowed in the storage box. 

Construction of the mast 

consisted merely of cutting 
the pieces to length and 
making a longitudinal hack- 
saw cut in the ends of three 
of them. See Table 1 . 

A small hole (about 1/16") 
is drilled 14" from the bot- 
tom end of the 3/4'' piece to 
provide an indication of the 
proper extension of the top 



section when the mast is 
erected. A stripe of paint or 
nail polish is easier to recog- 
nize, but the hole remains as 
a reference if the stripe is 
scraped off as the sections 
are telescoped. 

The stainless-steel hose 
clamps around the slots in 
the three outside pieces are 
used to clamp the sections 
of the mast together when 
extended and also to keep 
them from sliding apart 




Photo A. Beam being assembled with wing nuts. No tools 
required. 

46 73 MagailnB • May, 1984 



Photo B. Telescoped mast secured to car. Photo shows hose 
clamps and guy-line details. Mast is ready for installation of 
beam. 




Photo C Beam and transmission tine installed; mast being 
extended. 



while being handled. The 
1-1/8" piece acts as a stiffen- 
er for the bottom section 
and also allows the beam to 
be rotated and clamped in 
the desired direction. 

In operation, the mast Is 
secured to the side of the 
automobile with stretch 
cords (bungees) with the bot- 
tom section resting on the 
ground One cord is hooked 
under the frame, and a sec- 
ond one is hooked to the 
roof gutter. Two parachute- 
cord guys are snapped into a 
hardware ring which is 
slipped over the top hose 
clamp. The loose ring allows 
the mast to be rotated with- 
in the bottom outside sec- 
tion of tubing to aim the 
beam. The guys are secured 
to the opposite side of the 
automobile by stretch cords 
hooked into loops in the 
guys at one end and under 
the fenders at the other. 

The storage box was 
made by removing all the 
staples on the side and end 
flaps of the antenna ship- 
ping carton. The corners 
were reinforced with pieces 



of cardboard and the ends 
were closed with duct tape. 
The carton is thus converted 
to a long box with a hinged 
top cover. The box can be 
kept closed with a large rub- 
ber band around each end. 

Setup Procedure 

The following procedure 
has been worked out for 
mounting the beam and 
erecting the mast on a 1977 
Oldsmobile Delta 88. 

Prior to field operation, 
the mast should be erected 
without the beam to adjust 
the length of the guys, (See 
'Tield Operation/' below.) 
With the mast extended so 
that there is a 10" overfap of 
the first and second sections 
(the first section consists of 
the 1-1/8" and 1" pieces tele- 
scoped) and the top section 
is extended to just uncover 
the market hole (mast height 
12 ft), fasten each guy to a 
35" stretch cord and hook 
one cord on each fender on 
the side of the auto opposite 
to the mast 

The rear guy should be 
hooked at the rear of the 




Photo D, Mast fully extended. Beam being used with HT 



wheel to let the guy clear 
the rear door. Adiust the 
length of the guys to provide 
snug guying but not so as to 
bend the mast. For future 
rapid setup in the field, tie 
an overhand knot in a bight 
in the cords to provide a 
fixed loop to take the hooks 
on the stretch cords Tie a 
recognizable knot or other- 
wise mark one cord to distin- 
guish which cord goes to 
which fender 

Field Operation 

1) Remove the telescoped 
mast the stretch cords, and 
guy lines from the storage 
box. Hold the telescoped 
mast vertically against the 
side of the auto in the space 
between the doors (a stiff 



section of the frame as op- 
posed to the more flexible 
door panels). A cloth pad be^ 
tween the mast and the side 
of the car will protect the 
finish. Near the bottom, take 
one turn with the short 
stretch cord around the 
mast and hook it onto the 
underside of the frame. 
Take one turn around the 
top of the first section of the 
mast with one of the long 
stretch cords and hook it on- 
to the roof gutter. The mast 
will now be held firmly 
against the side of the car. 
The cords are just the right 
length for the Delta 88, but 
different lengths may be re- 
quired for other models. 

2) Loosen the top two 
hose clamps. Slide the hard- 



Piece 


Diameter 


Length 


End Slot 


1 


1-1/8" 


53" 


1" 


2 


1" 


55" 


1" 


3 


718" 


56" 


1" 


4 


3/4" 


56%" 


none 



Table t 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 47 



^ 






T4 




T 


\ 





Photo E. Pictorial parts 'Ttst/'(See Parts List) The box on right 
is storage box made from the beam antenna shipping carton. 



ware ring over the top sec- 
tion of the mast Fasten both 
hooks onto the ring and 

throw the two guy lines over 
the roof of the car. Raise the 
top mast section about a 
foot and secure it by tighten- 
ing the hose ciamp. 

3) Remove the antenna 
boom and elements from 
the storage box and assem- 
ble them. Mount the anten- 
na on the top section of the 
mast and snug the U-bolt by 
tightening the wing nuts. 
Connect the coax transmis^ 
sion line to the antenna, 

4) Raise the top section of 
the mast to just uncover the 
marking hole and fasten it 
securely by tightening the 
hose clamp. 

5) Extend the middle sec- 
tion so the total height is 
about ten feet Hold the 
middle section up firmly 
with one hand and fully 
tfgftten the hose cfamp. 
Stand so as to not be under 
the antenna. Hook the two 
remaining stretch cords to 
the guys and hook the cords 

48 73 Magazine • May, 1964 



under the fenders. While 
holding the middle section 
with one hand carefully ex- 
tend it until the two guys are 
pulled up taut but not so as 
to bend the mast. Tighten 
the hose clamp fully. 

6} Loosen the hose clamp 
at the bottom -the one 
around the 1-1/8" bottom 
tube. Aim the antenna in the 
desired direction by rotating 
the mast within the 1-1/8'" 
section. Tighten the hose 
clamp 

7) Pass the coax feedline 
from the antenna into the 
car and plug it into the two- 
meter rig. 

You're in business. 

CAUTION: Do not erect 
the mast in any location 
where it could possibly con- 
tact electric wires. Use care 
when handling the mast 
with the beam installed If 
the sections inadvertently 
telescope, the antenna ele- 
ments can become lethal 
spears. 

To take the antenna in- 
stallation down, hold the 



Parts List 

1 Cu5hcraft A1 47-4, 4-elerRent, 2-fnetef antenna 
4 8^2 wing nuts 

2 1/4" wing nuts 

10 tiat washers for IM'' U-bo!t {about 5/16'- spacer on 

each lag of Unbolt) 
4 e-ft. lengths, .058''-wall, 6061-T6 alumlnufn tubing (see 

Tabfe 1) 

3 stainless-steel hose clamps 

1 1-1/2*' hardware ring 

2 small snap hooks, si^ to fit hardware ring 

2 nylon parachute cords or other small lines alxsut 12 
ft- long (cord smaller than atraut 3/16'* Is not conve- 
nient to handle during mast erection) 

3 stretch cords with hooks, overall length 35" to ends 
of hooks' 

1 stretch cofd with hooks, overall length 28" to ends of 

hooks* 
1 wood base, approximately 3" x 6" x 5/B" thick (for 

mast base on unpaved surface) 
Tool spin-tite or endwrench to fit hose clamps 
Total weight in storage tx)x~7V4 lb. 

'These are standard sizes at the local hardware store. 



mast section being lowered 
firmly in one hand, loosen 
the hose clamp on that sec- 
tion, and then ease k down 
with both hands. Do not let 
the elements hit into the car 
roof— very hard on the 
finish. 

The installation described 
is stable and adequate for 
limited periods in moderate 
weather The erected mast 
could be strengthened for a 
longer stay in windy weather 
by adding a third guy oppo- 
site the other two, tied to a 
cinder block. 

One disadvantage of this 
setup is that when in place, 
neither door on one side of 
the car can be opened. This 
makes it awkward for two 
people in the front seat. It 
will probably be most con- 
venient to mount the mast 
on the driver^s side and use 
the opposite side as the op- 
erating position. It is also 
not convenient to rotate the 
mast from inside the car. 
However, the four-element 
beam has a broad lobe, so it 
need not be pointed pre- 
ciselv 

Performance 

With nothing resembling 
an antenna range or con- 
trolled field-strength mea- 
surements, an attempt has 
been made to compare the 



performance of the beam 
with that of a 5/8-wave- 
length mag-mount roof an- 
tenna. The equipment used 
consisted of an Azden PCS- 
3000 FM transceiver and a 
coax antenna switch to al- 
low rapid antenna transfer 
The PCS-3000 has an LED 
S-meter. In order to obtain 
com para live measu rem ents, 
the incremental signal 
strength in dB was predeter- 
mined for each of the LEDs, 

The signal from several 
repeaters indicated a beam 
gain of from 10 to 12 dB 
over the rooftop antenna. 
One distant repeater that 
could not be heard on the 
rooftop antenna was acti- 
vated with the beam. A sim- 
plex test with a station 17 
miles distant indicated ap- 
proximately a 10-dB advan- 
tage for the beam on both 
transmit and receive. With 
five Watts of output, the sig- 
nal at the distant station was 
reported weak and noisy. 
With the beam, the report 
was "solid, noise-free copy." 

The mast and beam ar- 
rangement has proven to be 
a convenient means of 
quickly making a significant 
improvement in communis 
cations performance from 
an automobile in a fixed 
location.! 





^^^^^^^^^, 


1 


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73 Magazine * May, 1984 49 



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50 JSMagazinB « May, 19S4 




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73 Magazine • May, 1984 51 






Simple Parabolic Theory 

With a little bit of math —presented here— you can understand, 
design, build, and enjoy these effective antennas. Hopefully. 



Luis £. Suarei OA4KO/W5 
PO Box 6699*1 
Caracas 1061*A 

In the near future, radio 
amateurs will be explor- 
ing new horizons that will 
dramatically enlarge the 
panorama of our radio ac- 
tivities. High-altitude sat- 
ellites and frequencies above 
1 GHz will be used along 
with very sophisticated 
transmitting modes. In con- 
trast niost radio amateurs 
are reluctant to undertake 
any project at frequencies 
above VHF, mostly because 
of lack of easy-to-read litera- 
ture. This article is intended 
to clarify some concepts on 
parai^olic antennas, to help 
in filling the gap in this area. 
The subject is centered 




on the theory of parabolas 

and their behavior. The de- 
sign of reflectors is dis- 
cussed with a minimum of 
mathematical implication. 

What is a Parabola? 

The parabola (paraboloid 
of revolution) is a curve that 
theoretically is generated by 
a point which moves in such 
a way that its distance from 
a fixed point, called the 
focus, always equals its 
distance from a fixed line, 
called the directrix. In Fig. 1, 
D-D' is the imaginary line 
called the directrix C-C' is 
the axis of the parabola; it is 
perpendicular to the direc- 
trix The moving point is P, 
If E-P = F-F for any posi- 
tion of P. then P is moving 
along a parabolic curve, P is 




midway between directrix 
OD' and focus point F, 

If the parabola is rotated 
around its axis, a surface 
called the surface of revolu- 
tion is produced. The same 
properties of the paraboloid 
of revolution apply for all 
the surface of revolution, 
because of symmetry. 

Energy Reflection 

It is important to know 
how reflection is produced 
in a plane in order to under- 
stand how the parabolic an- 
tenna worics. In the next 
paragraph. Til explain how 
the reflection of a light 
beam is produced. The same 
criterion should be env 
ployed when the energy 
source is a radio antenna. 



jp- J y -^ 

/ 7^^ * 

— ' — T — y^ ^^^^"^ * > 

Q^^ * 

— — \ — ^ ^^ ^ --^ * 

^m^ ^ - -= • - — ^:^ 

^ \ ^*«-^* 



In Fig, 2, you see a light 
beam that is aimed against a 
polished surface (like a mir- 
ror) from point O to point B, 
The beam will reach point B 
with an incidence angle a A 
reflection B-A will be pro- 
duced and reflection angle 
(3 will be equal to incidence 
angle a. 

Similarly, in a parabola 
(see Fig. 1), if a tangent to 
the curve is drawn at any 
point PI, then the angle a 
equals angle j8. Thus, if a 
source of energy is placed at 
focus fx>int F, its beam is re- 
flected by the parabola sur- 
face at point PI in the direc- 
tion Pl'L. Since Pl-L is per- 
pendicular to D-D', it is also 
parallel to axis C-C'. The 
same is valid for all points in 
the parabola Thus, a sharp 
directional beam may be 



\ 




Fig. 1. 

52 73 Magazine • May, 1964 



Fig. 2, 



Fig. 3. 



Fig. 4, 



obtained from a small non- 
directronal source. But be- 
sides the reflected beam, 
there fs also present a di- 
verging beam radiated di- 
rectly from the source. See 
Fig. 3. Hence, the resultant 
wave has considerable scat- 
tering unless the source is 
made directional 

You should be av^are 
that the theoretical source 
point has no physical di- 
mensions but is spherical 
in essence. And that a di~ 
pole is generally used in 
practical parabolics and 
obviously not all parts of 
the dipole are at focus al- 
though most radiation is 
produced at its center. 
Thus, defocusing is mini- 
mized. The higher the fre- 
quency, the smaller the 
feeding and the better the 
focusing. 

Second Reflector 

To eliminate the formed 
divergency beam, a second 
reflector is used. See Fig. 4. 
It is a spherical shield, S, 
mounted surrounding the 
dipole. It is not parabolic; 
it is spherical. The shiefd 
reflects radiation F-A back 
to point B. From B, it is fi- 
nally reflected in the di- 
rection B-C. The energy 
that does not reach the 
shield will follow the nor- 
mal path F-D-E as shown in 
the figure. 

The shield should be 
large enough to surround 
the dipole and smalf 
enough to not obstruct the 
normal energy path. The 
shield should have a radius 
of a value X/2 or a multiple 
of this value. The energy 
leaving the dipole in the ax- 
ial direction will be can- 
celed, but this has no im- 
portance since most of the 
energy will make apprecia- 
ble angle with the axis. 

The shield or second re- 
flector actually produces 
reinforcement because the 
beam is reflected at A with 
a 180'degree phase rever- 
sal. The total path from F 
to A and F' corresponds to 



0/2 





D/a 




(I) 



t?j 



(5) 



Fig, 5. 



a phase reversal of 360 de- 
grees. This, plus the 180 
degrees from reflection, 
makes the beam returning 
along A-B 180 degrees out 
of phase, thus producing 
gain. 

Instead of the second re- 
flector, a three- or four-ele- 
ment beam could be used 
with the beam front aimed 
against the parabola. It is a 
practical approach for 23 
cm and 70 cm but not feasi- 
ble for microwaves, since 
horns are much more suit- 
able at millimetric waves. 

Size of Parabolics 

The parabolic reflector is 
specified by its diameter 
and the focal distance. In 
Fig, 5, three types of parabo- 
las with the same diameter 
and different focal dis- 
tances are shown. Parabola 
2 has the property that f = 
D/4 and parabola 3 uses a di- 
rectional feed that confines 
the beam within the angle 
A-O-B. In this case the shield 
is certainly not necessary, 
since very little energy is 
radiated back from a high- 
gain antenna. Of course, the 
antenna is placed so that the 
beam is aimed against the 
parabola. In the case of pa- 
rabola 1, the feeding should 
not be a directional antenna 
since the beam would not il- 
luminate the whole reflec- 
tor, with the consequence of 
loss of gain. In the case of 
parabola 3, if a dipole is 
used, scattering of signal is 
expected beyond the reflec- 
tor edge, [t is noteworthy 
that the feed antenna's gain 
is consequence of the direc- 
tivity and has no meaning in 
the overall gain of the par- 
abolic. 

It should be noted that 
for a dipole (Fig. 41 radia- 



tion-lobe angle in the plane 
of the paper is greater than 
in the plane perpendicular 
to it. This means that the 
radiation pattern is not 
conical. If the dipole is ver- 
tically mounted, then the 
vertical angle will be wider 
than the horizontal angle. 
It is expected to be 1.25 
times greater. 

It is of paramount impor- 
tance that the beamwidth 
of the feed be matched 
with the aperture angle of 
the parabola as seen from 
the feed. To determine the 
distance (f) from the focus 
point to the parabola ver- 
tex (P in Fig. 1), use the for- 
mula: f = D2/16d, where 
D = parabola diameter and 
d = parabola depth (F-P in 
Fig. 1), For parabola 2 in 
Fig. 5, the distance f = pa- 
rabola depth d. But for 
parabola 3, the distance f is 
greater than the parabola 
depth. 

Cassegrain Parabolic 

The feeding of parabolics 
is often a cause of diver- 
gence or energy scattering 
that produces undesirable 
side lobes. The feed struc- 
ture blocks portions of the 
parabola and the energy 
reflected back to the ener- 
gy source creates standing 
waves- The above problem, 
of course, is worse in mi- 




Fig. 6, 

crowave parabolics that 
use bulky feedhorns. This is 
the case when maser or 
parametric amplifiers are 
placed very close to the 
feed. To avoid this prob- 
lem, a technique known as 
Cassegrain is used, Casse- 
grain parabolics are fed 
from behind the parabola. 
See Fig. 6. 

The main disadvantage of 
this type of feeding is the 
aperture blocking intro- 
duced by the hyperbolic 
subreflector used to reflect 
the energy back against the 
parabola. To overcome this 
problem, the feed is ex- 
tended and the subreflector 
is reduced in size. 

Parabolic Gain 

The gain of a parabolic 
depends on its size. Any par- 
abolic antenna may be used 
at any frequency as long as 
the feed system (dipole or 
whatever) is resonant at the 
chosen operating frequen- 
cy. The gain is greater when 
the frequency becomes 
higher or the parabolic 
diameter becomes larger. 
The most important consid- 
eration is that the feed 
should entirely illuminate 
the surface of the parabola. 
The efficiency of the para- 



ES 



.15 



(0 



,05 



^^^ ^^^^^_ ^^^^^_ ^^-^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^_ ^^^^^^ 



.05 



,15 .2 .S5 .3 



.35 



.45 



r\%. 7. 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 53 





Dtsti Diameter in Meters 


eand 


1 3 


6 to 20 45 


6 


- 1.3 


7 12 18 25 


2 


1.3 10 


17 21 27 34 


1JZ5 


5.4 15 


21 25 31 38 


OJ 


10 20 


26 30 36 40 


0.23 


20 30 


36 40 46 53 



Table 1. 

bolic may be considered as 
55%. Thus: gain over isotro 
pk = .55(tX diameter/wave- 
length)^. The parabolic beani- 
width ts calculated as fol- 
lows: beamwidth = 137,5/ 
(D/wavelength), where D = 
parabola diameter. 

Desigfiing a Parabolic 
Antenna for 23 Cm 

Now, let's design a para- 
bolic antenna for 23 cm us- 
ing a parabolic reflector of 
1 meter in diameter, This 
antenna could be used to 
work AMSAT Phase III 
mode L, The gain will be: 
.55[3.14T6(1/.23)P = 102; dB 
gain - 10 log (gain) = 20 
dBi. 

If a second reflector Is 



used, then the power gain 
is quadrupled: 4 X 102 — 
408. The dB gain will be in* 
creased by 6 dB: dBi gain 
= 10 log (408) = 26 dBi, 
-1 to -3 dB should be ex- 
pected in actual construe* 
tion. 

Reflector Design 

The parabolic beamwidth 
is calculated as follows: 
beamwidth — 1 375^D,'Wave- 
length) = 31 degrees, where 
D = parabola diameter 

From the preceding dis- 
cussion, it is known that the 
focal length should equal 
D/4 or 0,25 meters. Then the 
shape of the parabola is 
plotted on graph paper from 
the following equation: 
h = fi{4i — r^/D, where h and 
r are the axial and perpen- 
dicular distances in meters 
to any point P on the parab- 
ola. See Fig, 7 For our par- 
abolic, D=1 meter 

The curve is then plotted 
by calculating various val- 
ues of r as shown in Fig. 7\ 
This way a template is con- 



stnjcted to which the parab- 
ola may be fabricated. 



lanical 
Considerations 

Any irregularity in the re- 
flector tends to defocus the 
beam, increasing the side 
lobes and reducing both the 
gain and the beamwidth. 
The more the surface error, 
the more the ill effect A sur- 
face error of up to 1/16 
wavelength is tolerable. 1/16 
wavelength at 70 cm is 4.38 
cm and at 23 cm is 1 ,44 cm. 
So, at 70 or 23 cm it is very 
easy to achieve such toler- 
ance. However, this toler- 
ance is proportional to the 
reflector diameter A IO- 
meter reflector would be ex- 
pected to have surface de- 
fects 10 times greater than 
for a 1 -meter reflector. Thus, 
the smaller the reflector, the 
more careful its construc- 
tion should be. 

Finally, it is worth men- 
tioning that the lowest prac* 
tical frequency limit for this 
kind of antenna is around 



100 MHz. Below this fre- 
quency, the feed system and 
the gain^todiameter ratio 
are far from desirable. 

Table 1 shows the gains 
(dBi) achieved with several 
dish diameters for the ama- 
teur bands from 6m to 23 
cm. In the table you will see 
that 20 Watts into a parabo- 
la of 1 meter (3 ft) will allow 
you to reach Phase III mode 
L with the limit of 2 kW erp, 
not considering feedline 
losses. The 6-meter band is 
shown just for comparison 
purposes. ■ 

f^eferences 

S. Silver, Mfcrowave Antenna 
Theory snd Design, MIT Radia- 
tion Laboratories Series, Mc- 
Graw-Hill, New York. 
AnienBS para UHF y SHF <APF 
33U63L Universidad Nactonal 
de Ingenieria. Lima, Peru. 
ThB Lenkurt Demodulator, Vol. 
12 No. 5 and Vol. 12 No. 7, 
GTE Lenkurt, Inc., San Carlos 
CA, 

Henry Jasik, editor, Antenna 
EnginBering Handbook, Mc- 
Graw-HNI. New York, 1961, 



MIZUHO SX-3 LoW'Nolse Pre-amplifier 

Features: 

■ Cavers continuously between 3MHz and SOIViHz with 3 selective bands. 

■ Improves weak signal reception while reducing image interference and 
rejects out-of-band signals. 

• RF gain control and attenuator reduces the cross moduiaiion. 
ft Usable with transceiver with a remote control or also applicable with 
shorl'Wave recetver with high impedance output. 



Specifications: 

Frequency Range 

RF Gain 

RF Attenuator 

Inpyt Impedance 

Output Impedance 

Stand-by 

HandMng Power 

Power Source 

Dimensions 

Weight 



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:195mm (w) x 62mm (H) x 152mm (D) 

: 1 ,4kg 




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4rf i'iuimitiiiii'atiiiiis^ kH\ 



S4 73Magaz//7e • May, 1984 



ir"... Skl.l *i(i."*UT > u 



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Control Your Mobile Power 

Can commuting be a daily QSO party? 
Yes, with this no-payment installment plan. 



Bradley C. Mau^rKBSQZ 
4B F Ridge Road 
Greenbeit MD 20770 



Mobile operation is 
one of the most effi- 
cient uses of time possible. 
It allows me and, 1 am sure, 
many other amateurs to 
squeeze some operating in- 
to an otherwise too busy 
day- Almost all solid-state 
transceivers for any ama- 
teur band have been de- 
signed with operating mo- 
bile in mind and can be 



powered directly from an 
automobile's 13.fr-volt power 
system. 

Improper care in con- 
necting amateur equip- 
ment to this power can 
cause problems, however, 
and, in some cases, even 
damage equipment. No 
one would knowingly try to 
operate a 13.8-volt radio 
from an eight-volt supply 
or from a supply that had 
24"Volt spikes on it But 
low-voltage conditions can 
easily occur by having re- 
sistance in the circuit used 
to deliver power to the ra- 




The assembled power controller mounted on the wheel- 
well in the engine compartment of my car. The relay is 
held to the plastic sandwich box with double-sided tape, the 
capacitor is held with a cable tie, and the box is held in place 
with a single sheet-metal screw which also is the ground 
point for the relay and capacitor. 

56 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



dio. Many high-power 
transceivers draw in excess 
of fifteen Amps while trans- 
mitting. Under these condi- 
tions, a few tenths of an 
Ohm can easily drop the 
supply voltage a few volts. A 
good, direct path from the 
battery to the radio should 
be made to ensure a steady 
supply voltage. This connec- 
tion should also be fused for 
safety. 

When we start our cars, 
nasty things hapf>en to the 
power system. For one thing, 
it gets loaded down by the 
starter^s high current de- 
mand. The starter, while 
grinding away to start the 
engine, can induce huge 
pulses onto the car's power 
system. These high-voltage 
pulses can kill solid-state de- 
vices. 

The Solution 

Automobile manufactur- 
ers protect their radios and 
accessories from these start- 
ing transients by having a re- 
lay or switch connected to 
the ignition switch that dis- 
connects power from these 
accessories white the engine 
is being started. This is why 
the radio turns off when the 
car is being started. 

The circuit in Fig. 1 is a 
power-control system I use 
in my mobile operation. It 
uses the accessory voltage, 
which is disconnected au- 
tomatically during starting, 



to operate a relay. Only 
when accessory voltage is 
present will power be sup- 
plied to the amateur gear. 
The capacitor helps filter 
out any residual noise and 
alternator whine. 

Other than the accesso- 
ry voltage wire to the relay 
coil, all wiring should be 
#14 or #12 stranded wire. 
Suitable wire can be found 
in the automotive depart- 
ment of most department 
stores. 

Finding a place to put 
the circuit can be a diffi- 
culty, especially in today's 
smaller cars. I built mine 
into a soft-plastic sandwich 
box and bolted it onto the 
fender inside the engine 
compartment. Wires enter 
the box through tight-fit- 
ting holes. I mounted the 
fuse holder through a hole in 
the side where it would 
be handy and mounted the 
relay and capacitor to the 
box with double-sided 
tape. Fig. 2 shows the lay- 
out of my box, although 
most any layout would 
work. 

Finding the Voltages 

The 13.8 volts coming 
from the battery should be 
obtained as close to the 
battery as possible. Most 
cars have two leads on the 
positive terminal, a fat one 
that goes only to the starter 
and a thinner one, about a 
quarter inch in diameter, 



that goes to everything 
else. This thinner one gen- 
eral! y goes to a terminal 
block or a relay. Solder a 
large terminal lug to the in- 
put lead of the power con- 
troller and fasten this lug 
to the same post or connec- 
tion that the thin battery 
wire is connected to. Some 
amateurs connect leads di- 
rectly to the battery, but 
because of the corrosive 
conditions close to the bat- 
tery, these connections can 
corrode and lose their 
good connection. 

Finding the proper ac- 
cessory voltage to operate 
the relay varies in difficul- 
ty from car to car In my 
car, the positive wire from 
the radio was readily avail- 
able under the dash, so I 
tapped into the line with 
a ''squeeze" tap connector 
(Radio Shack 64-3052). If 
your car does not have a ra- 
dio or if the radio's power 
lead is not available under 
the dash, the power leads 
of any accessory which au- 
tomatically turns off dur- 
ing starting will be suitable 
(e,g., windshield wipers or 
heater fan). Otherwise, 
check around the fuse box 
for such a voltage. Even if 
your car has no radio, it 
usually has a fuse dedi- 
cated to accessories, and it 
might even be marked so. 
Whatever you find, be sure 
to check the voltage to 
make sure that it goes 
away when the starter is en- 
gaged. 

Most cars have plastic or 
rubber plugs in the fire- 
wall. In order to pass wires 
from the engine compart- 
ment to the passenger 
compartment, I drill holes 
in these plugs. Try to make 
the holes no larger than 
necessary so that fumes 
from the engine compart- 
ment don't get into the pas- 
senger compartment. 

Grounding 

Even if you have a good, 
solid connection to the 
positive terminal of the 
battery, losses can be expe- 
rienced in the ground or 




The power controller, sealed in the plastic box, takes little 
room in the engine compaftnnent and keeps the electron- 
ics safe, clean, and dry. 



negative side of the circuit. 
In a car, the negative leg of 
the circuit is usually the 
car, its frame, and the 
body. This is not always 
sufficient especially in 
newer cars. 

fn order to insulate the cars 
against sound and to elimi- 
nate squeaks and rattles, 
manufacturers put sound- 
deadening insulation be- 
tween metal parts. This ma- 
terial is usually also an 
electrical insulator. Any 



current flowing between 
body parts must then trav- 
el though the bolts and 
screws hotding the parts to- 
gether. These often rust 
and lose their good con- 
nections, 

1 found this out acciden- 
tally by an experience 1 
had with my car. I was hav- 
ing problems keeping a 
battery charged and had 
already replaced the bat- 
tery and solid-state voltage 
regulator— which was fas- 



TO 
©ATTERY *■ 



EGA 
FUSE 



TO ACCESSORY 

VOLTAGE 



I 



J- l-OOO^F 
55 V 



TO RADIOS IN 

PASSENGER 

COMPARTMtiMT 



12V RELAY WITH 

20 AMP CONTACTS 



f/g. 7. Schematic of the power-control- box. The capacitor 
value is not critical, but should not be increased since it 
would increase the current surge through the relay. 



Fiii^F _vf 


.mil 












r 




^SriEET METAL SCRCWS 


FUSE 
HOLDER 










0-^ 

/ 




l^fTO FENDER 


Tft 


4 


■ 




b, Tc^ ftftrii-ri* lu 


BATTCC V^ 


— 






/ 


t 




PASSEflGER 
COMPARTMEWT 




1 




1 




+ 

M- 

o 
o 
o 




f 
3RY 

r 




1 


1 


{ 


/ 

3 


TO 1 
ACCESS* 
VOLT AG I 




■u 
RELAY 


SOFT PLASTIC 
SANDWJCH BOX 




i 



















Fig. 2, The power control box as built into a soft-plastic 
sandwich box. The fuse holder is Radio Shack 270-367, the 
capacitor is 272-1019, and the relay is 275-218 with the 
common and normally-open contacts tied in parallel for 
increased current. The normally-closed contacts are not 
used. 



tened to the fender in the 
engine compartment. My 
alternator checked out 
OK. 

One day, after complain- 
ing to a mechanic friend, 
he took his voltmeter out 
of his toolbox and put the 
leads between the cases of 
the alternator and voltage 
regulator. The meter 
showed that while the en- 
gine was running, there was 
over a volt difference be- 
tween these two grounds. 
The ground connection of 
the voltage regulator had 
so much resistance that it 
was keeping my battery 
from being fully charged. 

Placing a jumper wire 
between the alternator and 
the regulator fixed my low- 
battery problem. The mor- 
al of the story is: Don't 
trust grounds! Run a good 
stout ground line from the 
point the battery's nega- 
tive terminal connects to 
the car (usually the engine 
block) into the passenger 
compartment and ground 
all your equipment 

Temporary Installations 

Sometimes it is not pos- 
sible to make a permanent 
installation, as in a bor- 
rowed or rented car, for ex- 
ample, or in the spouse^s 
car if your spouse doesn't 
share your enthusiasm for 
amateur radio. (My XYL, 
Mary, has little apprecia- 
tion for a car full of radios, 
wires, and connectors. Af- 
ter years of explaining and 
demonstrating the plea- 
sures of operating and con- 
struction, she still calls it 
CB just to irritate me.) 
However, generally cars 
have a cigarette lighter, 
and a cigarette-lighter 
adapter is available cheap- 
ly that can supply power in 
a pinch (Radio Shack 
270-1534, for example). For 
VHF and above, magnetic- 
mount antennas provide a 
good means of temporarily 
connecting an antenna. 

I have found that it is not 

a good practice to leave ra- 
dios sliding around loose 
on the seat or floor while 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 57 



ELASTtC flAOtO 
HOLD-D0Wt4 




Fig. 3. An examph of a radio mounted to the transmission 
hump with an elastic hold-down. The radio could be 
mounted on the side of the hump for better viewing. The 
insert shows the construction of one end of the hold- 
down. 



driving. The device shown 
in Fig. 3 (which my wife re- 
fers to as my "bra-strap") 
can hoid a rig firmly to the 
floor or to the transmission 
hump. [ also use them to 
hold amplifiers and other 



accessories to the trans- 
mission hump of my car. It 
consists of the hook por- 
tion of a one-inch-wide 
piece of Velcro fastener 
sewn to both ends of an 
eighteen-inch length of 



inch-wide elastic- The 
hooks grab firmly into the 
carpet but can be peeled 
back off in less than a sec- 
ond. Black elastic and Vel- 
cro give a nice, profession- 
al look, but any color 
works. 

Mounting Radios 

A big problem with any 
mobile installation is that 
radios should be easy to 
disconnect and remove 
from vehicles, A locked 
door will discourage on- 
ly a casual thief. I use 
a two-part mount that is 
sold for mounting car ste- 
reos. These are available 
at discount houses often 
for less than five dollars 
apiece. I bought six identi- 
cal mounts so that I could 
mount all my rigs (and have 
a few spares, of course), I 
have two mounts in my car 
and have the remainder 
bolted to a short bookshelf 
in my shack. On the radio 
half of the mounts, I have 



mounted a ten-meter FM 
rig, a two-meter rig, a CB, 
and a cassette deck. Now 
all my radios fit inter- 
changeably, and it takes 
only seconds to install or 
remove gear. 

All my antennas have 
BNC connectors on them 
and all rigs have adapters 
to BNC connectors. This 
helps save time and keeps 
everything standardized. 

The mounts I use have 
six sliding contacts. I cur- 
rently use only two. one for 
power and one for ground, 
but I plan to use the others 
for external speakers and a 
remote mike. 

Mobile operation can be 
a lot of fun. especially if 
time Is spent on a good in- 
stallation. This includes 
having good power and 
ground connections. In any 
case, try not to leave radios 
turned on while starting, 
and never transmit while 
starting. Hope to meet you 
soon on the air mobile. ■ 




\ RTTY/CW COMPUTER INTERFACE 



from 



DGMIeL EC TROmCS, IMC. 




Model DGM-1 



Mark and Space active filter demodulator 
with bandpass and post detection filtering* 
Not a phased locked loop demodulator. 

Copies 170, 425 and 850 Hz RTTY shifts and 

800 Hz CW tone. 

Built-in stable, sinewave AFSK modulator 
and FSK output, 

Bargraph and LED tuning indicators. 

Scope tuning outputs. 

Positive and negative CW keyed outputs. 



TTL level and RS232 level computer I/O is 
compatible with commercially available 
software. Uses standard I/O connector 
(included). 

Easily connects to your computer 

Manual or Auto PTT control. 

Powered by 120 VAC wall transformer 

(included). 

Attractive aluminum enclosure for superior 
RF shielding. Size — /"W x IVz'H x 7"D. 

Made in USA, One Year Warranty. 



Send for free information or contact your local dealer. 

787 BRIAR LANE, BELOIT, WISCONSIN 53511 (608) 362-0410 



58 73 Magazine • May, 1984 




I^ 



HF Fquipmenf Regular SALE 

IC-740* 9-band 200w PEPxcvr w/mic$ 1099.00 349^^ 

*FREE PS-740 Internal Power Supply & 

$50 Factory Rebate until gone! 

PS-740 Internal power supply 159.00 149^^ 



20,00 

39.00 
50.00 
59.50 
47.50 
96.50 
96,50 
159 00 144^^ 
39.00 
39,50 
19.50 






*EX-241 Marker unit 

*Ex-242 Fi^uniL.. :..;:.:: 

*EX-243 Electronic keyerunit *. 

*FL-45 500 Hz CW filter (IstfF).,., 

*FL-54 270 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 

*FL-52A 500 Hi CW filter (2fid IF) 

*FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd If) 

*FL^4A SSB filter (2n(l IF) 

SM-5 8-pin electret desk microphone 

HM-10 Scanning mobile microphone 

MB-12 Mobile mount..... 

*Optioni also for IC-745 thteci betow 
lC-730 8-band 200w PEP xcvr w/mic $829.00 59&'^ 

FL-30 SSB filter (psssband tuning) 59.50 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF) 

FL-45 500 Hz CW filter..... 

EX- 195 Ma rker un it , , 

EX"202 IDA interface; 730/2KiyAH4 

EX^203 150 Hz CW audio filter 

EX-205 Transverter switching unit 

SM-5 8 pin electret desk microphone 

HM-iO Scanning mobile mrcrophone 

MB-5 Mobile mount 

IC'720A 9 band xcvr/-l 30 MHz rcvr$ 1349,00 899'^ 

FL-32 500 Hz CW filter 59.50 

FL-34 5.2 kHz AM filter 49.50 

SM-5 8-pJn electret desk mtcrophone 39.00 

WB-5 Mobile mount., , . 19.50 

IC-745 9-band xcvr W/.1-30 Mhz rcvr $999.00 899^5 

PS-SS Internal power supply 160.00 144*5 

CF5 455K5 2.8 kHz wide SSB filter TBA 

KM-12 Hand microphone 39 50 

SM-6 Desk microphone 39.00 

*5ee iC-740 fist above for other opiion^^ (*) 



159,00 144'^ 
59,50 
3900 
27.50 
39.00 
29.00 
39.00 
39.50 
19.50 




IC-751 9-band xcvr/ 1-30 MHz rcvr $ 
PS-35 fnternal power supply.., 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter 

FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter , 

FL-33 AM filter 

FL-70 2.8 Khz wide SSB filter.. 

HHil-12 Hand microphone 

SH-6 Desk microphone 

RC-IO E?(ternal frequency controller 
CR-64 High stability reference xtal 

Opiiom: 72Q/7.W/740/74.V751 

PS-15 20A external power supply 

EX- 144 Adaptor for CF'l/ PS-15.... 
CF-1 Cooling fan for PS-15,..-..... 

PS 20 20A switching ps w/speaker ... 



1399.00 

160.00 

96.50 

96.50 

31.50 

46.50 

39.50 

39.00 

35,00 

56.00 

Regular 

$149.00 

6.50 

45.00 

229.00 



1229 

144'^ 

89*^ 

89*^ 



SALE 
134*^ 



199 



»s 



ICOM 



Options - continued 

CC'l Adapt, cable; HF r3dio/PS-20 

CF-1 Coofing fan for PS 20. „.,,. 

EX-310 Voice synth: 745, 751 ........ 

SP-3 External b^se station speaker ... 
Speaker/Phone patch ■ specrfy radio 

BC-lOA Memory back-up 

EX-2 Relay box with marker 

AT-100 lOOwS band automatfc ant tuner 
AT 500 500w 9'band automatic ant tuner 

MMOO Manual antenna tuner 

AH-1 5-band moblie antenna w/tuner 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6-pin plug 

OPC Optional cord, specify 2 or 4-pJn 

GC-4 World clock....... ,.... 

IC-2KL w/ps 1601 5m solid state amp 

VHf/UHf base muki-mode^ 
1C-251A* 2m FM/SS8/CWtrarfSceiver 

^$50 Factory Rebate 



Regular SALE 

10.00 
45.00 
39.50 
49.50 
139.00 129^5 

8.50 
34.00 
349,00 314*^ 
449,00 399** 
249,00 224^5 
289.00 259^^ 
259.35 233^^ 

5.50 
99,95 94*^ 
Regular SALE 
1795,00 1299 

Regular SALE 
$749.00 549^^ 

until gone! 



IC-551D 80 Watt 6m transceiver 

PS-20 20A switcfiing ps w/speaker 

EX- 106 F M option 

BC'IOA Memory back up 

SM-2 Electret desk microphone 

1C-271H lOOw 2m FM/SSB/CW xcvr 

PS-35 Internal power supply....... 

IC 271A 25w 2m FM/SSB/CW XCVr... 

AG-20 2m preamplifier 

IC-47 1 A lOw 430 450 SSB/CW/FM tm 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

PS-25 Internal power supply 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

HM-12 Hand microphone 

SM-6 Desk microphone 

VHF/UHF mobUe muki- modes 
IC-290H 25w2mSSS/FMxcvr,TTPmic 
tC-490A lOw 430-440 S$B/FM/CWxcvr 
VfiF/UHF/1.2 GHz FM 
IC-22U lOw 2m m non-digital xcvr 

EX- 199 Remote frequency selector 
IC'25A 25w, 2m, grn leds, up-dnTTPmic 
IC'25H as above, but 45w .. (Specia(f) 

BU IH Memory back up 



$699 00 

229 00 

125 00 

8.50 

3900 

TBA 

160.00 

699.00 

56.95 

799.00 

39.95 

99.00 

39.00 

39.50 

39.00 

549.00 
649.00 
Regular 
299.00 

35.00 
359 00 
389.00 

38.50 



599" 
199" 
112" 



14495 

719" 
89" 



489's 
579»^ 
SALE 
249*5 

319" 
339" 



Um'aed Offer! Geta FREE BU-IH Memory 
back-tjp with your purchase of an IC-25H. 



IC-27A 25w 2m mobile transceiver,... 

EX- 388 Voice syntfiesizer 

IC-45A lOw 440 f M Kcvf. TTPmlc... 

AG-l 15 db 440 Mhz preamplifier 

EX'270 CTCSS encoder..... 

BU-1 Memory back-up 

RP-3010 10 w 440 Mhz FM repeater 
IC-120 Iw L2 GHz FIVI transceiver.... 
RP-1210 lOw 1.2 GHz FM repeater.... 

Cabinet for RM210 or RP-3O10 

SfTt portable 

fG-505 3/lOw 6m port. SSB/CW xcur 

BP-10 Internal Nicad battery pack 

BP-15 AC charger 

EX-248 FMunit 

LC-10 Leather case... 

SP-4 Remote speaker. 



K + i !■+«'« -ii-i-H n ' 



369.00 

TBA 

399.00 

89.00 

39.00 

38.50 

999.00 

499.00 

1 199.00 

249.00 

Regular 

$449.00 

79.50 

12.50 

49.50 

34.95 

24.95 



329^5 

359" 
799^ 



899^^ 
449^^ 



SALE 




Hand- held Transceivers 
Deluxe models Regular SALE 

IC-02A for 2 meters $ 319 00 2g9" 
IC-02AT w/OTMF 349.00 314" 

IC-04A for 440 MHz TBA 
IC-04AT w/OTMF TBA 

Standard models Refular SALE 
IC-2A for 2 meters $ 239.50 214" 
IC-2AT with TIP 269.50 219^5 




IC'3A for 220 IWHz 

JC-3AT withTTP... 

1C-4A for 440 MHz 
IC 4AT with TTP 



b ri- I •!■ ■■ 



269.95 234" 
299.95 239" 
269.95 234^5 
299,95 239" 



Accessories for Deluxe modeh Regular 

BP-7 aOOmah/ 13.2V fJicad Pak ■ use BP 35 67 50 
BP-8 800mah/8.4V Nicad Pak - use BP-35... 62.50 
BC-35 Drop in desk charger - afl batterres.... 69.00 

BC-16U Wall charger = BP7/SP8 10.00 

Accessories for both models Regular 

BC-25U Extra wall charger for 6P2... , $ 1000 

BC-30 Drop in Charger - 6P2/BP3/8P4/BP5 6900 
BP^2 425mah/7.2V Nicad Pak - use 6C30.... 39.50 
BP-3 Extra Std. 250 m3h/8.4V fJicad Pak,.., 29.50 

BP-4 Alkaline battery case. 12.50 

BP-5 425mah/10.8V Nicad Pak - use BC30 49.50 

CP-1 Cigarette lighter ptug/cord ■ BP3 9.50 

DC-1 DC operation pak for standard models 17.50 

LC'2AT Leather case lor standard models 34.95 

HM-9 Speaker microphone 34.50 

HSIO/HSIOSB Boom mic headset/switch box 39.00 

HP'IOSA Vox unit for HS-10..., ...... TBA 

ML-1 2m 2.3w in/lOw out amplifier SALE 79.95 

ML-25 2m 2.3w in 20w out ampjiher....SAL£ 179.95 

3A-TTN Optional TT Pad ■ 2A/3A/4A 39.50 

SS-32M Commspec 32-tone encoder 29.95 

Marine model 

M42 12 ch Marine Hand-held...... SPECIAL 269.95 




Shortwave receivers 

R-71A 100 Khz 30 Mhz digital receiver 

R-70 100 Khz 30 Mhz digital receiver 

LA'ti^/ r 4Tl URJI 4 . 4 *a if > * ■ » # r > t ■ ■ . ■ -1 4 

IC-7072 Transceive Imerface, 720A 
FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF)..,..,. 
FL-63 250HzCWfilter(lstlF],, 

SP-3 Esternaf speaker 

EX^299 (CK-70) 12v DC option.. 
MB-12 Mobile mount............ 



Regular SALE 

1799.00 699*5 

749.00 599^^ 

38.00 
112.50 
159.00 144*^ 

48.50 

49.50 
9.95 

19.50 





Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



HOURS; Mon. thru Fri. 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 

MHwautee WATS line 1-800-558-0411 ansv^ered 
evenings until 8:00 pm, Monday thru Thursday. 

Please use WATS line for Placing Orders. 

Forotherinforrration.etc. please use Regular line. 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

1-800-242-5195 



iii^iriiiai];iJ»Hi;{ii:i[*>iiTJJf 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 



Inc. 



AES BRANCH STORES 



WICKLIFFEp Ohio 44092 

28940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio WATS i-800'362-0290 

^'' 1-800-321-3594 



ORLANDO. Fla. 32803 

€21 Comnnonwealth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894 3238 

Fta. WATS 1-800-432-9424 

?S 1-800-327-1917 



CLEARWATER, Fla. 33575 

1898 Drew Street 

Phone (813) 461^4267 

No In^State WATS 

No Nationwide WATS 



LAS VEGAS, Nev. 89106 

1072 N. ftancbo Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3114 

l4o In-StateWATS 

^!: 1^800-634-6227 



Associate Store 

CHICAGO, IllinoU 60630 

ERICKSON COMMUKICATJOKS 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631-5181 

SS 1-800-621-5802 



73 Magazine * May, 1984 59 



Virginia's Antenna Farmer 

From Falls Church comes a simple message to fallow hams. 

Simple antennas work! 



Brii Clarke WA48LC 

Box 2403 

F^h Church VA 22042 



This is not just another 
innovative antenna arti- 
cle. I haven't reinvented the 
wheel and I shall not ask 
Vou to do mind exercises to 
understand obscure theory, 
nor shall I dazzle you vi^ith 
exotic physical design, f 
shall, however, provide the 
weekend "antenna farmer" 
with a simple-tcHconstruct, 
surefire antenna project 

Most new-generation sol- 
id-state HF transceivers are 
designed for instant QSY but 
suffer severe swr limitations. 
Hence the need for broad* 
banded antennas that re- 



quire no tuning or switching 
to QSY from band to band. 

The antenna t shall de- 
scribe is fail-safe, will work 
under even adverse condi- 
tions, and has no lossy coils, 
traps, or stubs. Best of all, it 
can be designed for any 
band or bands desired fed 
with one feedline, and built 
in a few hours for only a few 
dollars. 

Theory 

The dipoSe antenna and 
various like antennas have 
been around for a long time. 
They are the workhorses of 
most antenna systems, al- 
though often hidden within 
complex design. The dipole 
is inherently balanced, broad- 
banded, and easily fed with 
coaxial cable. It works welt 
on the lower amateur fre- 
quencies, giving good gener* 




The cenfef insulator with the left s/rfe of a 3-band antenna in- 
stiled. Notice the use of the braid as a fleKtble connector 
Hfie from the antenna Hself to the center insulator lug. 

§0 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



al coverage in alt directions 
It also is quite useful on 20 
meters and above but does 
display some directional 
characteristics. 

Many amateurs, capital- 
izing upon these character- 
istics plus the facts that di- 
poles are light in weight in- 
expensive, and easy to in- 
stall, have never felt a need 
for towers or directional an- 
tennas. Yet these same hams 
have worked WAS, 5BWAS, 
DXCC, etc. 



Materials 

First, before building the 
antenna, you must have a 
feedline to carry the rf from 
the transmitter to the anten- 
na. I've found over many 
years as a ham, that feed- 
lines must reach from the 
transmitter to the antenna. 
No more, no less. Excess will 
only get in the way, and less 
won't reach. I've never 
found a need for quarter- 
wavelength or other mea- 
sured feedlines. 




so MEttRS 



40 MEtCRS 



30 METERS 



LFEEtJLtNE 



Fig. 1. Typical 3-band ^itenna with one feedline. 



aO UETERS 




ALL COHNECTiOhS 



«0 HttCff5 



Fig, 2. Connectbn of /egs to the center insulator. 



The feedline should be 
RC-58 for output levels urv 
der 200 Watts and RG-8 for 
all others At frequencies 
from 160 to 10 meters, these 
choices witf function well 
and exhibrt negligible losses 
(see Table 1). 

Purchase your coaxial ca- 
ble carefully; if good quality 
is purchased, you can be as- 
sured many years of use. 
Check the cable for the 
amount of shielding over 
the center conductor. Cen- 
erally, the more shielding, 
the better the quality. To cut 
cost comers at this point is 
to invite trouble in later 
years with a poorly perform- 
ing station. 

Be sure the PL-259 con- 
nectors used on your feed- 
line are installed properly. If 
In doubt consult any of the 
handbooks for examples 
and guides on their proper 
installation. 



It is a wise amateur who 
covers his outdoor feed line 
connectors with a weather- 
proof sealant. I generally 
use a silicone glue such as 
General Electric's RTV prod- 
uct This will prevent mois- 
ture from entering your 
carefully purchased coaxial 
cable and avoid the mois- 
ture-associated problems of 
rf loss and high swr, both of 
which will affect your ope^ 
ation. 

The wire for the antenna 
should be copper stranded 
or solid, number 14 or larger, 
to ensure adequate strength. 
An alternative, used at this 
station for years, is galva- 
nized electric fence wire. 
The latter is available in rolls 
of Vi mile, size #17, for 
about $15. You also will 
need a few insulators, some 
nylon or poly rope, and a 
center insulator. I recorrn 
mend the Van Corden Engi- 
neering Hl-Q, at $6.95, avail- 
able from most amateur 
outlets. 

Conslfuction 

Table 2 gives the lengths 
of legs for the various bands 
of operation. The lengths 

noted are the distance from 



the center insulator to the 
end insulator for each leg. I 
recommend building this 
antenna for two to four 
bands. More than this will 
result in a clumsy package 
to handle and install (see 
Fig. 1). 

In constructing your an- 
tenna, each leg must be 
strongly fastened to the cen- 
ter insulator, then soldered 
to the tab, I have found that 
a jumper wire from the leg 
to the tab is the best meth- 
od, as it allows for flexibility 
during adverse weather corv 
d it ions (see Fig. 2), 

Each leg must pass 
through the eye of the cen- 
ter insulator and fold back 
eight inches. The eight inch- 
es is wrapped over the leg it- 
self and soldered. After all 
legs have been installed in 
this manner, cut a piece of 
RC-58 six inches long and 
strip the braid off. Use this 
braid as the jumper, wrap- 
ping it once around each leg 
about one inch from the 
eye, leaving one inch free 
between each leg and sol- 
dering same to each leg. 
Then solder the free end to 
the tab. 

Installation 

When construction is com- 
pleted, you must decide the 
method of installation— di- 
pole or inverted vee. For in* 
verted vees, the angle be- 
tween the legs at the apex 
must never be less than 
ninety degrees or signal can- 
cellation will result A height 
of thirty feet at the apex will 
be adequate for most gener- 
al operation. If a dipole is 
decided upon, the height 
should be equivalent to the 
apex of the vee— thirty feet 
or better 

The longest legs are the 
highest All legs must be 
kept sufficiently above 
ground level so as to avoid 
having a shock hazard 

The antenna I use has legs 
marked with a single aster- 
isk in Table 2 and is oper- 
ated as an inverted vee. The 
height of the apex is thirty- 
five feet, fastened in a 
handy tree. All legs of my 



antenna end with a smalt 
plastic insulator and are tied 
to a support at least eight 
feet above ground level. 
This keeps the kiddies from 
coming into contact with 
the wires. 




Fig. 3. Apex angle. 




30 METERS 
40 IfETEHS 






I 



Fig. 4(al Typical inverted-vee installation. 




Fig. 4(bX Typical dipole installation. 




a-ieo7 




Fig. 5. Alternative design for limited space 

73 Magazine • May, 1984 61 



■■ 



Barxl 
160 

80 

40 

30 

20 

15 

10 



RG-58 
,50 dB 
J6dB 
1,00 dB 
l^dB 
1 .50 dB 
1.60 dB 
2.50 dB 



As interpreted from 
Antenna Handbook. 



RG-8 

^dB 
.40 dB 
.55 dB 
.65 dB 
JBOdB 
.95 dB 
l^dB 

the ARRL 



Table 1. Transmission line 
losses. 

The feedline should be al- 
lowed to fall straight down 
from the center insulator. 



then led to the station. Try 
to align the feedline and the 
various legs to prevent the 
feedline from running paral- 
lel with any of them (see 
Figs. 3 and 4). 

Testing 

After the antenna is as- 
sembled and is in position, 
test it on each band and 
note the swr at the design 
frequencies. If the swr is 
1.2:1 or less, you need no 
further adjustments. Should 
the swr exceed this limit, 



Band 
160 low 
160 high 

80 CW 

SO phone 

40 CW* 

40 phone 

30 

20 

15 

10 



Length in feet 

126.5 

120.0 

62.6 

* 60.5 
33.1 

* 32.3 

16.5 

11.1 

B2 



Length In meters 

38.6 

36.6 

19.1 

18.5 

10.1 

9.8 

7.1 

5.0 

3,4 

2.5 



• The *egs of the WA4BLC antenna* 

* * Often this set of legs will operate as a 3/4-wave!ength antenna on 
15, providing you with two antennas for the price of one. 

Table 2. Antenna leg lengths. 



tune up the band 100 kHz 
and note the swr, then tune 
down 100 kHz and note that 
swr If the swr is lower up 
100 kHz. you must increase 
the length of the legs being 
tested. If the swr is lower 
down 100 kHz, decrease the 
length The adjustments in 
length must be made equal- 
ly to each leg of the band 
being tested or there will be 
a loss of symmetry. Use ad- 
justment increments of six 
inches for 160 meters, three 
inches for 80, two inches for 
40 and 30, and one inch for 
all other bands. Always test 
and adjust the lowest fre- 
quency band first as this set 
of legs will be the support 
for the rest of the antenna. 

Alternative Design 

An alternative design that 
wi[( allow operation on 80 
and 40 meters in a limited 
space is built in a similar 
fashion, but the longest legs, 
those for 80 meters, are 
folded and the shorter legs 
are nested within them (see 



Fig. 5). This antenna has 
been a favorite of mine for 
many year^ and has given 
performance equal to any 
full-size antenna tried at this 
QTH Be sure to keep the leg 
ends at least eight feet 
above ground level to avoid 
shock hazard. On the dia- 
gram you will notice weights 
on the ends of the folded 
legs; these are to keep ten- 
sion on the wires and keep 
them straight 

Conclusion 

These antennas give in- 
stant QSY for all bands of 
design with no need for an 
antenna tuner, which was 
the original goal, and will 
provide consistently good 
contacts. I have worked all 
states on 80 and 40 meters 
with these antennas, again 
attesting to the fact that 
simple antennas do work, 
and work well 

Remember safety and 
keep your antennas clear of 
all power lines. Happy "an- 
tenna farming."B 



/MIIVIGE 



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73 Magazine • May, 1984 63 



lohn M. franke WA4WDL 
1J10 BoU'mg Avenue 
Norfolk VA 23508 



Throw in TV 

Why not? This helix-building experience 
includes everything else. . . 



One of the major com- 
plaint made by radio 
amateurs is the lack of time 
for working on amateur- 
radio projects. Such things 
as mowing the lawn, paint- 
ing the house, and gardening 
are brought up by the wife 
just when some time or a 
break In the weather is 
found for an antenna or 
other construction project 
One solution I attempted 
was to mix my projects be- 
tween those for the family 



and those for amateur radio. 
For instance, recently I 

wanted to build a new an- 
tenna to receive OSCAR on 
432 MHz, The antenna would 
be a helix. Helixes are circu- 
larly polarized and will re- 
duce fading due to polar- 
ization rotation. However, I 
planned instead to build two 
antennas — both helical. The 
first would be for UHF tele- 
vision reception. It would be 
used to pull in channel 15 
for the family television. Be- 



cause of the wide band- 
width of the helix, reception 
of channels 27 and 33 would 
also be improved. The first 
antenna would serve as a 
prototype for the second, a 
satellite antenna. The sec- 
ond antenna was the one I 
wanted. 

Design 

The design of a helix an- 
tenna is straightforward and 
detailed methods can be 
found in the literature.^^^ 

However, for amateur and 
entertainment applications, 
a few simple rules suffice. 
First the circumference of 



one turn should be between 
0.75 and 1.33 wavelengths. 

For use on a single frequen- 
cy, a value of l.Q is used. For 
the television antenna, I 
chose a center frequency of 
610 MHz. Hence, the circum- 
ference of one turn is: C — 
300/f(MHz), 300/610^.49 me- 
ters or 19.4 inches. The low- 
frequency limit is then 
found by: ki = 1.33 x' 
,49 = . 654m; fL = 300A654 = 
459 MHz. The high-frequency 
limit is found by: k^^ 
075 X. 49 = 369m; fH = 300/ 
.369^813 MHz. The UHF 
television band extends 
from 470 MHz to 890 MHz. 




End view of finished 5-f urn helix for UHF TV reception. 

64 73Magazme « May, 1984 



Side view of UHF TV helical antenna. The antenna is right 
circularly polarized. 






METRIC 


ENQLISH 


s 


,IJ4rn 


4,i** 


{i 


laStn 


«.o* 


t> 


.3g3m 


l5,5"(ie"USED3 


■ 


13 5- la.s* 1 



DO NOT SC*LE 



Fig, h Five-turn right-circularly-polanzed helix antenna. 



W 1/4 



t*" 



T> 



4 1/2 



4 1/2 



r 



'^r 



IMlOiSKM] 

«»E m mcHet 

£»0 HOrr SCALE 



LOWER 

HELI^ 




C^: 






<J- 




C^ 



id 



J/4 QIA iSAHE AS 

HELJK wire; 



-I 



■UpFEfi 
HEtIK SUPPONT 

SPL(T AFTER 

DRILLING 

HOLES 



23 l/Z 



Fig. Z Longeron construction. 



Since our area is restricted 
to channel 49 or lower, the 
design is complete. 1 believe 
the antenna would work 
even for higher channels, 
but you can shift the center 
frequency to redesign for 
the higher channels if de- 
sired. 

Second, the pitch angle 
for the helix should be be- 
tween 12 and 15 degrees, I 
used a value of 13.5 degrees. 
Knowing the pitch angle (a) 
and the circumference (C), 
the turn diameter (d) and the 



tum spacing (S) are calculate 
ed as follows: d = (C/n)cos 
a=l49mJ3A4) cos13,5^.152 
meters = 6 inches. S = C sin 

a = ,49m sin13.5 = .n4 me- 
ters =4.5 inches. 

Third, the ground plane or 
disk diameter, D, should be 
equal to or exceed .8 wave- 
lengths at the design fre-* 
quency: D>240/f(MHz) = 
240/610 = 393 meters = 15.5 
inches (round up to 16 
inches). 

The final dimensional val- 
ues are shown in Fig, 1. The 



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diameter of the wire used to 
wind the helix should be be- 
tween .005 and .05 wave- 
lengths. For the television 
antenna, this translates to 
between 2.45 and 24.5 mm 
(0.0% and 0.96 inches}. 
Quarter-inch copper tubing 
works well and looks inv 
pressive when cleaned and 



protected with clear tac- 
quer. How much tubing is 
needed? Simply multiply C 
by the number of turns pfus 
one to allow for the start. In 
this case: L = C(5 + 1) = 294 
meters or about 9 feet 8 
inches. Hence, two antennas 
could be made easily from 
one 25-foot roll of tubing. 





Rear view showing 50-239 connector and support mou/il- 
ing screws. 

*^S«ff U$fof Advertisers on ffag§ 114 



Close-up of supports and coax connector. 

73 Magazine • May, 1964 65 




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After at(, you have to buy 
the tubing for the family an- 
tenna. The leftover scrap 
will make do for your hobby 
antenna. 

The input impedance of a 
helix can be approximated 
by: Z = 140 X Qcircumfer- 
ence in wavelengths). Hence, 
for the television antenna, Z 
varies from a low of 105 
Ohms to a maximum of 1 86 
Ohms. If 93-Ohm coax is 
used, the vswr would not ex- 
ceed 2:1, However, the im- 
pedance is seldom the nomi- 
nal value and is influenced 
by how the first turn is 
made. I have found that for 
noncritical work, 7SOhm 
coax is a reasonable com- 
promise. For antennas used 
with medium- or high-power 
transmitters, particularly sol- 
id-state units, a matching net- 
work should be included. 

Construction 

The helix supports, or 

longerons, were made first I 
was able to use a long scrap 

66 73 Magazine • May, 19&4 



piece of phenolic material 
for the supports. Any insula- 
tjve material could be used, 
i.e., dried wood, fiberglass, 
plastic, or bakelite. The helix 
supports were marked, 
drilled, and split from a 
single piece of material as 
shown in Fig. 2. The holes 
must be drilled before 
separating the two pieces. 
The two supports are sep- 
arated with two spacers 
which were epoxied in place 
to maintain parallelism be- 
tween the two helix sup- 
ports. The helix turns sit in 
the half-hole notches. A 
round tile was used to slant 
the notches at 133 degrees. 
This allows the tubing to be 
seated all the way down. 
The antenna photographs 
show the spacers. They also 
show that I got carried away 
on the band saw and re- 
moved most of the excess 
material between the helix 
contact points All I can say 
is that it does reduce wind 
load and weight and looks 



neat— but it is a lot of need- 
less work. 

Before winding the helix, 
the copper tubing was 
marked at each C/2 point to 
aid in accurately mounting 
the helix. The tubing was 
then close-wound over a 
short piece of SVz-inch tub- 
ing. If the wind is in the same 
sense as a right-hand-thread- 
ed bolt, the antenna will be 
right circularly polarized. 
After the coil was released, 
the far end was trimmed. 

Next, the helix was slid 
over the support longerons. 
The trimmed far end was po- 
sitioned over the last notch 
on the upper support and 
clamped, while a hand drill 
was used to drill through the 
tubing and into the support 
with a number 35 bit (6-32 
tap size). Then the tubing 
was shifted over and just the 
hole in the tubing was 
drilled out with a 6-32 clear 
bit The support piece was 
tapped and a Vi -inch-long 
6-32 screw wais used to an- 
chor the tubing down. 

Turning the antenna over, 
the next C/2 mark was cen- 
tered over the last notch on 
the lower support. As with 
the end, the tubing and sup- 
port were drilled, the sup- 
port tapped, and the two 
fastened together with a 
6-32 screw. 

This process was contin- 
ued until each turn of the 
helix was firmly secured to 
the supports. The start end 
of the tubing was bent in a 
smooth curve to the center- 
line and cut off. The free 
end was drilled to accept 
the center pin of the coax 
connector 

The ground plane was cut 
from an old rack paneL Wire 
screen or hardware cloth 
would work well; I just hap- 
pened to have this old panel 
which looked perfect for the 
job. Besides, getting rid of 
the panel can be considered 
as helping to clean the 
garage Again, I got carried 
away on the band saw and 
the result is seen in the pho^ 
tographs. The final design 
functions as well as a solid 
disk but is lighter, has less 



wind resistance, and looks 
more interesting than a plain 
disk. 

Mounted in the center of 
the ground plane is the coax 
connector, an SO-239, 1 
know it is not a constant inn- 
pedance connector, but it 
was cheap and it works OK. 
Anyway, I cannot seem to 
master the assembly of male 
type-N cable connectors. 
The two 14-20 bolts that 
thread into the two helix 
supports and secure the 
ground plane to the sup- 
ports are used to fasten the 
antenna to the mast via an 
aluminum angle bracket A 
word of caution: If you use 
a chimney mount or mount 
near a chimney, make sure 
the antenna is below the 
chimney port. That way, the 
exhaust fumes, which are 
acidic, will bypass your 
work of art. The antenna will 
perform longer and will stay 
cleaner, 

A short run of RG-SS con- 
nects the antenna to the 
balun on the television Run- 
ning twin lead to a balun at 
the antenna would gain a 
couple of dBs, but the extra 
gain was not needed. For my 
application, the secondary 
purpose in building the an- 
tenna was to get directivity 
and a little gain above the 
local tree line to reduce 
multi-path fading and flut- 
ter. The primary purpose 
was to buy time to work on a 
432-MHz helix. While help- 
ing to install the helix, my 
wife noticed the gutters 
needed cleaning; maybe I 
can work on my antenna 
next month! By the way, 
the gain is between 9 and 11 
dB over a dipole and the 
half-power beamwidth is 
about 50°. ■ 

References 

1. John D. Krauss, "Helical 
Beam Antennas for Wide-Band 
Applications," Proceed/ngs of 
the LR.E., Octot>er, 1948, page 
1236. 

2. William L Blair, "Putting the 
Helix to Work;' Radio & TV 
News, November, 1958, page 

a Jim Kyle, VHP Antenna Hand- 
book, 73, Inc., 1965. 



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M 



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D CHECK/MO D MC D AE □ VISA D BILL ME 



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Foreign airmail, plea&e inquire- Please allow 6-8 weekb for delivi^ry. 






Kantronlcs interface 

The Interface For 

Apple, Atari, Th99/4A, TRS-SOC, 
VIC'20, and Commodare 64 

Computers 





Interface II is tha new Kantronics transceiver -to- 
coniputer intc^rfaee. Interface II features a highly 
sensitive front end with mark and space filtering. 
Even the most discerning operator will be surprised 
with the Interface IFs ability to dig out signals in 
poor band conditions. Our unique luning system even 
displays signal fading. 



X-Y scope outputs and dual interface outputs for 
VHF and HF connections make Interface II rom[>ati- 
ble with almost any shack- All three standard shifts 
arc selectable, and Interface 11 is AMTOR compati- 
ble* Interface II is designed for use with Kantronics 
software. 



Kantronics Software 



The Industry Standard 



Hamsoft 



Our original program for reception ami iransinL«>skm of 
CWHTTY ASCII Features include Split Screen Display, 
Message Ports, Type>a!ipad buffer, and printer conll>al^bi^ 
Ky. Apple Diskelte S29.95, VIC-ZO cartridge $49.95, Atari 
board S49.95. TRS-80C board $59.95. TI-99 4A cartridge 
599.95. 

Hamtext 

All tht' k^ature^ of Ham*»oft with the following addi- 
tiofial capabilities: text editing^ leceh'ed message storage, 
variable buffer %ues. diddle, utird wraparound, time 
transintssion* aitd text transmts&ian from tape or disc. Jtw 
prt>ciram \% available tm cartridge for the V1C*20 or 
Commodan' 64. and disketle for the Apple. Suggested 
Retail $<^9.95. 



Hamsoft Amtor 

This pri>gram ha& Hams<ift features with ihe added 
abjiitv of communicating in the newest coded amateur 
format-AMTOR. AMTOR offers emn free hm; powet 
cominunicatitjti. HetnisL^fl Amtcjf is availaye for the Aiari. 
TRS-80C* VIC 20, and ComnKKfeire 64 computers. Sug- 
gested Relail S79.95. 

Amtorsoft 

For I he prions AMTOR operator using a \/IC'20. 
ComnKKfofe 64, or Apple computer. This program is 
similar to Hamtext in capabilities, but can only be used f(jf 
AMT<'>H Hw Apple version includes both Hamtext and 
Amtufsi^H r>n one diskette (S139.95J, uhife the Vic 20 and 
Comniodore 64 cartridge is just Amtorsoft (S89.95J, 




Kantronics UTU 

Universal lerminal Unit 
For Everyone Else 




KANTRONICS SETS A NEW STANDARD WITH THE 
L KANTRONICS UNIVERSAL TERMINAL UNIT. 



UTU allows any computer with an 
RS232 port and a terminal program to 
interface with any transceiver. Additional 
software isn't necessary with UTU, as an 
internal microcomputer gives the unit data 
processing capabilities to send and receive 
in four coded amateur formats: Morse code, 
Radioteletype. ASCII and AMTOR. 

Sample terminal programs for IBM, 
TRS-80 Model III and IV, Kaypro, and other 
computers are included in the manual 
Enhanced features can be user defined by 
altering the terminal program, giving you 



COTiai 



flexibility to program for your specific needs. 

The Kantronics Universal Terminal Unit 
can send and receive CW at 6-99 WPM; 
RTTY 60, 67. 75. 100. and 132 WPM; 
ASCII no. 150, 200, and 300 baud: and 
AMTOR. Dual tone detection and our 
unique bargraph tuning system make tuning 
fast and easy. Additional LEDs indicate 
Lock and Valid status during AMTOR 
operation. The RS232 port is TTL or RS232 
level compatible. 

If you've been waiting for a Kantronics 
system for your computer, the wait is oven 



or write: KKantfOniCS 



1202E 25rdSr'^^^'^ 
Lawrence. K^t ,j^ 66044 




QUALITY TUNERS THAT DELIVER MORE PERFORMANCE, 
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MFJ*941D 300 WATT VERSA TUNER II 

* ||0f5 MFJ^t ftftiil tttllng him ptctci In ptinty of niw fetturtr 
JTT* Niw ityttfigl Brushed aluminum from. AH metal cabloet. 

1-I-S4) Nfw SWR/Wattnwtirl More accurate. Swltcti selectable 300/3<] 
watt ranges- Read forward/reflectid power. 

Nfw anttnni iwHch! Front panel mDunted. Select ^2 
coax lines, direct or through tuner, random wire/ 
Dafanced line or tuner bypass for dummy load. 

New alrwound Inductor! Larger more efficient 
12 position alrwDund inductor gives lower tosses and 
more watts out. Run up to StX) watts RF power output 

Matches everything from 1.B to 30 MHz: 
d I poles, inverted vee, random wires, 
verticals, moCl^le whips, beams, balanced 
and coax lines. 

Built-in 4:1 balun lor balanced Iir\e5. 
1000 V capacitor spacing. Blad, 
11 X 3 X 7 Inches. Works with an 
saiid state or tube rigs. 
Easy to use anywhere. 



MFJ-MOB, S79.95, 300 watts, SWRA/VaHmeter, antenna switch on roar. 

No baiyn . 8 x 2 x 6 In. eggshelf white witt^ walnut gral ned sides, 

MFJ-943, $79.95. fike MFJ-940B witri balun, le$s antenna switch. 

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MFJ^MO 200 WATT VERSA TUNER 



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DELUXE VERSA 
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tl^O^ MFJsbtit 
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thing from 1.8* 30 MHz, 
coax, randoms, balanced 
lines, up to 300W out- 
put, solid state or tubes. 

Tunai out SWR on di- 
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quads. 

|yllt4n 4:1 bilun. 
30OW, 5(HJhm dummy 
load SWR meter and 2 
range wattmeter (300W 
ancflJW). 

S position intanrtt 
twitch on front panef. 12 
position alr^wotjnd in- 
ductor; coax connfctofs, 
tufxJing pests, black and 
beige case. 10x3x710. 



Match ei coax, random wtrai 1 .8-30 MIHz. 
Handles up to 200 watts output; efficient 
alrwound inductor gives more watts out. (+$4) 

5x2^6 in . Ute eny trantceNer, solJd state or tube. 

Operate ali bands with one antenna. 

OTHER ZOO WATT MODELS: 

MFJ-iOl, $59.95. iike 900 Dul Includes 

4il balun for use with balanced lines. 

MFJ-16010, $39.95, for 

random wires on ty . Great ttir 

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operation. Tun^ 1 .&-30 MHz. 



MFJ-9621.5KW 




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MFJ-989 3KW ROLLER INDUCTOR VERSA TUNER V 



VERSA TUNER III 



Runup t440^' 

to 1.5 ^StAym 

KWPEP (+$ll» 

aitd match any feedllne 
continuously from 1J to 
30 MHz: coax, balanced 
line or random wire. 
Built-in SWR/Watimeter 
has 2000 and 200 watt 
ranges, forward and re- 
flected power. 2% meter 
movement. 6 punltlon an- 
tenna switch handles 2 
coax lines (direct or 
through tuner), wire and 
balanced lines. 4:1 baiun 
m pf 6 KV variable 
capacitors. 12 position Irh 
cftjctofs. Ceramic rotary 
switch, All metal blade 
cabinet and panel gives 
ftFi protection, rigid con* 
struction and sJeek styl- 
ing. Flip stand tilts tuner 
lor easy viewing. 
5x14x14 inches. 



#%^Afi Meet "Vina Tumr V". It hit iH the featurtt yeu aiksd 
9wXT • for, including the new smaller size to match new smaiier rigs ■ 

(+110) wily 10 3/4"W X 4 1/2*'H x 14 7/8"D. 
Mttchet ceaK, bifancett Hntt, rtndom wirei — 1.8 to 30 MHz. 3 KW PEP- 
the power rating you won't outgrow (250 pf-5K V caps). 
Rollir Inductor with a 3-dlglt turns counter plus a spinner knob for precfse 
inductance control to get that SWR down to minimum every time. 
Built-in 300 watt. 50 ehm dummy load, built-in 4:1 ferrlte balun. 
Built-fn2% mrtBT reaas SWR plus forward and reflected power in 2 ranges 



(200 and 2000 watts). Meter llgt^t requires 12 VDC. Optronal AC adapter 

MFJ-1312 is available for $9.95. 

6-floit0on antenna twlttd (2 coax lirres, through tuner or direct, random/ 

balanced line or dummy load), SO-239 connectors, ceramic fetd4hroughs, 

binding post grounds. 

Deluxe aluminum low-prorflls cabinet with sub-chassis for Rf I protection. 

black finish, black front panel with raised letters, tiit ball. 

*^9 MFJ-981, $239.95. 3 KW. 18 position switched dual Inductor, 

SWR/Wattmeter. 4:1 balun. 



ORDER ANY PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY IT-NO 

DBUQATIQH. IF NOT DELIQHTEO. RETURN WITH- 
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• One year unconditional guarantee • Made in USA, 

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• Call or write for free catalog, over 100 producti. 




MFJENTERPRISESJNC. 
BOK 494. MlitltslppI Stite. MS 39762 



TO OflOER OR FOR YOUR NEAflEST 

DEALER. CALL TOLL-FREE 

800-647- 1B00« Call 601 323-5869 
in Miss and outside continental USA 

Telex 53-4590 MFJSTKV 




70 73 Magazine • May, 19S4 



MFJ RTTY / ASCII / AMTOR / CW 





RTTY/ACSII/AMTOR/CW 

INTERFACE 

CARTRIDGE 

FOR 
VIC-20/C-64 




MFJ-122» 

$C0 95 



69 



Moit Vifutlli f^HY/ 
ASCII/AMTOn/CW Ijitir- 

fKi cartflctgi available for 

VIC'20 and Commodore 

64. Gives you more features, more performance, 

more value for your money tt^an any other InterfaGe 

cartridge available, 

Same Interface cartridge works for both V tC-20 and 
Commodore 64, Plugs Into user's port. 

Chme frem wide variety of aTTY/A5CII/CW, 
even AMTOR software. You are not marf led to one 
ofi-board software package. Use MFJ, Kantronics. 
AEA pfus most other software cartridge, tape or disk, 

850 Hz ind 17D Mz shifts on rm^lve and transmit. 

Hii mark end ipace oiJt|HJtt for scope tuning. 
^ Hormal/flevtni twitch eilmifiales retunlng. 

True fiuil chinnet martc and iptci letivt flfttrt an<f 
automatic mresn#io correction gives good copy whm 
one tone Is oOJiterated by QRM or selective fKJIng. 

Eity, potltfvi tyning ^jth twin LED indicalors. 

Narrow 800 Hz active GW filter. A^tmatic PTT. 

Ear 72% sine gerafanor tor APSK outpiit. 

Shielded XCVR AFSK/FTT lRtiffac« cibia pfcrvld- 
ea. Pius Of mmy$ CW keyed mitpui. FSK out. 

Powered bf comiJuttr (few mAJ. no power adapter 
toiHjy Of extra wire lo dandle or pick up/radlate Afi. 

Qbtss epoty PCB. Aluminum enciosure. AVtxAVtxV. 



MFJ INTERFACE plus MFJ 
SOFTWARE CARTRIDGE 



for VIC-20 or Commodore 64. 
MFJ-122a PLUS MFJ-1250 
Of MFJ-t2S1 for one lew price 



«gg95 

Save $20.00 



SOFTWARECARTRIDGE FOR 

VIC-20 /C-64 MFJ-125n/MFJ-l25l 

Pewarlul MFJ loftwtrt $ AQ 95 

cartridge for VIC^20 (MFJ- ^^^ 

1250, m.%) and Commodore 64 (MFJ-1 251 .$49.95). 

Plugs into expansion port. Devaloped by MFJ. 

Fiilurtf RTTY/ASCII/CW sand and rec«lve. split 
$crBen display, type ahead duffer, message ^rts. 
itiluidlspfay. automatic CWspeed tracking, paralM 
prffllveoi^patlblllty plus mucti more. 

SUPER RTTY FILTER 



$ 



39 



95 




' *iP1 L'iDiWTISi ■piTTP* A~? Tc T 



/ffT 



tW«P 





Stipif RTTY 

f1lt»r greatly 
improves copy under 
crowded, fading and weak signal (^Hidltions ImF^'wes 
■rty RTTY receiving system. 8 pole tandpass active 
filter for 170 H; shift {2125/2295 Hz mark/space). ZOO 
or 400 Hz bandwidths. Automatic noise llmlter . Audio 
in, speaker out lacks. On/off /bypass switch. "01^" 
LED. 12 VDC or 110 VAC with optional AC adapter. 
MFJ'1312, S9.d5. 3)c4xt Inch aluminum cabinet 



r 



GENERAL PURPOSE RTTY/ASCII/ 
AMTOR/CW COMPUTER INTERFACE 

Lets you send affd receive ccMnpiiterized RTTY/ ASCII /AMTOR/CW* Copies 
all sliifts and all speeds. Copies on both marii and spaoe. Sharp 8 pofe active 
fitter for 170 Hz shift and CW, Plugs between your rig and VIC-ZO, Apple, 
TRS-80C, Atari, TI-99, Comtnodore 64 or most other personal computers. 
Uses MFJ, Kantronics software and most other RTTY/CW softwara. 



• 



1^ "vm 



IK 

PWH LOCK OATJI XMIt 

• • • • 



JITW 



KDilW 



MFI BTTY CW 
COMPUTER IKTEHFACE 



• # • • 



• 



MOI3^.;frt4.:fii4 



«tfA 



MFJ Software plus MFJ Interface for VIC-20/C*64 

Software cartridge alone, $40.95. Order MFJ-125«0/Mf J-1224 ^ ^ #%#% qc 
for VIC-20, MFJ-1251/MFJ-1Z24 for Commodore 64. * T 29 

tncludas caijii to intedsce MFJ-1ZZ4 to VlWO or 064, ^i%* 



MFJ-1224 
$AA95 



99 



NfW MFJ-1224 flTTYMSCIIMMTOR/DW CoiTh 

IHTttr Interfaei lets you usfi your personal computer 
as a computerized full featured RTTY/ASCii/ 
AMTOR/CW siaticm for sending amj racelvtng. Plugs 
t>etween rig and VIC^20. Appk. TRS-dDC. Atari. 
TI-99. Commodore 64 and most others. 

Uw MFJ (tifl MFj-t250/1251 Mow) software for 
VfC'20. Commodore 64 and Kantronics for Apple, 
TRS-80C. Atari, TJ-99 and most oth^r software for 
RTTV/ASCII/AMTOR/CW- 

Eity, potltlvi tuning with tw^n LEO lndicate>rs. 

Copy any thft! (170,425,850 m and all other sliifts) 
and any st^ {5^100 W^M BTTV/CW and up to 300 

baud ASCIIS 

Coptst on Ixrtfi marli and ipict, no! mark only or 
Ipace on[y , to improve copy under adverse conditions. 

Sfvirp I poll 170 Hi ihtft/CW ictlvt f1lt«r glv«$ 
good copy under crowded, fading and weak signal 
conditions. Automatic noise llmiter suppress static 
crashes for better copy. 

NOfinai/Ravftrta twitch eliminates retunlng. +25C 
VDC loop output drives RTTY machine. Speaker Jack. 



Airtomitic tneUng copies drifting signal. 

Eiar 2206 tlna gtritrttor gives phase continuous 
AFSK tones. Standard 2)26 Hz marie and 2295/2975 
H? space Mfcroptione ifrw: AFSK out, AFSK griHmd. 
PTT out and PTT ground. 

FSK keying output Plus and minus CW keying. 
CW transmit LEO. External CW key jack. 

Kintnmlet ecmipitjble tachet. 

Eielin^ gtfitnl purpose toefcit allows Inted^- 
\v% to nearly any personal computer with most appro- 
priate software. AvailaDle TTL lines: RTTY demod 
out, CW demod out CW-ID input, +5 VDC. ground. 
All signal lines are buf^red and can txi inverted 
using an Internal DIP switcfi. 

U» Gtifo tcrftwin witti Appti, RAK witti VIC-20. 
Clay Abrams with TRS-&OC, N4eu with TRS-dO Mj, 
IV. Some computers with same software may require 
some external components, 

Mtlil etMnet. Brushed alum, front, 6x1)^x6 In. 
12-15 VDC w 110 VAC wltti adafrtBT, MFJ'I312,$9.95. 



MFJ-im, VakM, RWag e^iity far MFJ-tm, I 



CW INTERFACE CARTRIDGE 
Af £ W FO>* VIC-20/ C-64 




% 



39 



95 



HIgli ptrtormanM CW 
mtirftcf cartridge Givej 
^^ excellent pertormaJKe 

M F J-1226 under weak , crowded, noisy 

conditions. Works for tx^h VJC-20 and Commodore 
64, Plugs into user's port 
4 pele 100 Hi btmMdth jcthn fXm. 800 Hz 

center frequency. 3 pcle active lowpass post dotectfon 
filter Exclusive automatic tracking ccHnparator. 

Plut and minut CW Idylng. Audio In. speaker out 
lacks. Powered Dy computer. 

IfKludet Ratie litting of CW transmit/receive pro- 
gram, Avail^e on cassette tape, MFJ^12S2{VIC'20) 
or MfJ-T253{C-B4), $4,95 and on software cartridge. 
MFJ*1254(VtC-20) or MFJ-1255(C-B4). $19.95. 

You can alio ute MFJ-12S0 (V!C^ 0) or MFJ-125t 
(C-64). $49.96 each, RTTY/ASCII/CW software cart- 
ridge. Or use Kantronics, AEA and others. 

Alio copy RTTY with single tone detection. 



UNIVERSAL 5WL RECEIVE 
ONLY COMPUTER INTERFACE 
FOR RTTY/ ASCII /AMTOR/CW 

MFJ-1225 



$ 



69 



95 - 




MFJ-t22S plus MFJ-1Z50 
or MFJ-1251 ^mm 



Uttyour 

ptfltnil ojmputer 

and cdmmunicatJQfis 

receiver to receive commercial. mHitary and amateur 

RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/CW fraffic, 

Plugi b ttw tii ncvlvfr tnd VIC-19, Apple, TRS< 
80C, Atari, Ti-99. Commodore 64 afK] most otfwr 
personal computers. Requires appropriate softv^i. 

Um MFJ(tfi thli Hf}, Kantronics, AEA and mtst 
other RTTY/ASCII/AMTOR/CW software. 

CoplMiN sMfttendilJ tpiMiii. Twin LED indicators 
makes tuning easy, positive. Normal/Reverse switch 
ailminates tuning for inverted RTTY. Speaker CHJt 
lack. Includes cable to interface MFJ-1224 to ViC-20 
or Commodore 64. 4yixT Wx4l/i inches. 12-15 VDC or 
110 VAC w^th optional adapter. MFJ-1312, td.95. 



ORDEfl ANY PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY IT- NO 
QiUQATION. IF NOT OELmHTED. RETURN WITH- 
IN 10 DAYS FOR PROMPT REFUND (LESS SHIPPING) 
« Or>6 year uneo^ditlOAal guarantee « Made in USA. 
• Add $4 00 eacti shipping/h^vliitig • Cilioriirtli 
f»r frte ettalog^ om IflO produeto* 




MFJ ENTERPRISES. INC, ^g 
Box 494, Mississippi State. MS 39762 



TO ORDER on FOR YOUR NEAREST 
DEALER. CALL TOLL-FREE 

800-647-1800* Call 601 -323^669 
tn Miss, and outside continentai USA 
Teiix 53-4590 MFJ STKV 




^See List oi A(S¥enfS0rs on pa^e T74 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 71 



internatiqwal) 




Each month, 73 Mngs you 

ham radio news from around the 
world, tn this cotfectior} of re- 
ports from our foreigr} corre- 
spof}dBnts, we present the lat- 
est news in OX, contests, and 
events, as well as keep you 
abreast of the technical 
achieyements of hams in other 
countries. 

if you would like to contribute 
to your country's column, write 
to your country's correspondent 
or to 73: Amateur Radio's 
Technical Journal, Pine Street, 
Peterborough NH 03458, USA, 
Attn: Jack Burnett. 






AUSTRAUA 

44 Wren Street 
Ationa 3Q16 
V^taria 
Anstrsfia 

Aftef the disastrous Ash Wednesday 
bushfires in 1983, (he Victorian State Gov- 
emnent set up a Bushftre Review Ccwn- 
mitiee and asked all thtii neliief or emefgeiv 
cy senrices that wefe involved lo ^uboiit a 
report on thAlr activKlet, plus recofnmefV' 
daitons fof an/ improvements itiat these 
agencies thought woul^i tielp tn any fyture 
major disaster. 

Thf3, with respect to ihe role of WIG EN 
(Wireless Inst Huts Clvi^ Emergency Net- 
work), was a case of shutting the barn 
door after the horse had bolted, for efforts 
had been macte siK months before the 
fires to clarify WiCEN's position in the 
event of a major cfieis^ As a result of these 
discuss iofis, WiCEN was reminded of the 
vast impfOVBinertts made in the communi- 
cations equtpment used ty authorities in 
lecent yeaj^, which meant that WtCEN 
would not be needed except in circum^ 
stances such as an earthquatte which 
"topples our antennas." 

Just how much the author (ties overesli- 
mated their corrm^unicahon capabilities 
In this type of disaster became tragically 
evident. 

In light of the above, the Wireless Insti- 
tute of AustraMa (Victorian Division} sub- 
mitted to the Bushfiro Ravtew Committee 
a comprehensive report on the role that 
amateur radio, via our WfCEN network, 
piayad In this emergency. As this report is 
too long to include In total, perhaps high 
light ir>g some of the faults we found in our 
op^^rat^onai procedure may help othef 
overseas amateur emerge'fKy services lo 
avoid the sarrw probterrtft. 

Dvef 200 operators were mobilized or 
put uodei staridby condrtlons during thve 
Ash Wednesday period 0< these, only 30 
wefe cor>sideii8d to have had any formal 
iraming with WICEN. In the event, Ihe larg- 
er ^natetir population was pressed mto 
servk^^ ar>d they pertomiod very well. 

Now to some of the problems. Where 
the WiCEN operators were established at 
Held stations, including relief centers, 

72 ?S Magazine • May, 19S4 



P0opl« dtd not fcrxtw wfm the WICEN per- 
son was or where ttte WICEN camp was 
located. 

People also d\d not know what was be- 
ing provided or know how to use the 
WICEN commynicatlon network, They 
Ihought we were providing C8 radio. 
These problems were uaually so Wed by an 
explanation by the WICEN person^ but a 
great deal of suspicion and reserve was 
still exhibited. 

WICEN personnel were not Identifiable 
through unilorms, badglng, or Idem^f^ca- 
tiofi caidE, These would have m»c}e pass- 
mg through road blocks and recognition 
at the point asSitgned for radio operatiorkS 
m^h 99^im. 

WICEN control over movsfnents of tts 
personnel was inadequate because no 
formal arran>gement existed with authori- 
ties and no proper provisHm had been 
made to cope wtth tasks, which errverged. 
These fncluded activities of en adminfs- 
tratlve and management nature, neces- 
sary in any well-oiled efficient operation. 

Among the shortcomings of WICEN 'S 
internal management was the fact that no 
formal records were kept of duty hours 
performed by field operators. Thts gave 
rise to situations in which personneJ who 
had been wtlhout s^eep for more than 24 
hours were still volunteering fot the next 
ahlft or another duty call efsewhefe. Even 
when radio amateurs were ordered off du- 
ty. itHire was no way of ct^ecklng that they 
actually did obtain rest. 

Tha facilities at WICEN HO were totally 
inadequate, tiastcally Etecause WiCEN 
Ck^es not fiave a permartenl HQ as such, 
with ttw result that operations were ini- 
tiated at one radro amateur's horT>e on 
Wednesday evening and subsequently an 
operating center was set up at another's 
garage/workshop which happened to 
have two telephone lines. 

WICEN HQ operated for the first 2Vi 
days with all meals being provided pri- 
vately. On I he third day, a mobiie caravan 
was obtained from the Stale Emergency 
Services and placed In an appropr laie site 
In a suburb of Melbourne. Here, personnel 
were obliged! to solicit the aid of local resJ- 
dsnta in order to obtain toilet facilities. 
With food and drlr^ still having to come 
from private source 

OreratI, the WICEN Involvefnent was 
not only far from b&»ng an exercise In 
•fMflfSy message handling, tight nef cofv 
trol^ ar>d efficient and accurate passing of 
formal messages, it was a disastw in it- 
seif. However, In terrfts of the provision of 
field communications In response to all 
known requests, the operation was a 
great success. It Is considered that 
WICEN provided a significant contribu- 
tion to the community, 

I pefSonBlly think that Ihe service we 
are giving, as seen by others, Is just as inn- 
poftant as the service we think we are giv- 
ing. Sometimes we terwl to be blinded, 
within our own organijEatlon, by our own 
9efise of achievement or tailtire. 

Bearing this hi mind, I* feel (he lot lowing 
letlef of gratitude sent to the Victorian Di- 
vision of the Wire-less Instituie of Ausirar 
ha says It alt. 

The Order of St. John In Austrilia 

SL Johii Ambulance Brigade 

Victoria Olatrtct 

tn the wake of the devastating "Ash 

Wednesday" busntifes, f wori/d ttHs to 

pface on record the Brigade's deep 



respect and epprecfatfon for the vttAi 
communications Unks provided by fhe 
Wiretess Institute Chfl Emer^ncy fiat- 

work (WfCEM 

Ttmre were many occasions during ihAi 
tragic period whan the Brigade's i^ommu- 
nioatfofiS tacilitias were inadequata or 
tmffdered inop^faff^ due to terram pecu- 
iiafttiea. traffic congestion, and oth^ dif- 
ficufties. 

For ffte first time ever in a ma/or inci- 
dent of this magnitude, the Brigade was 
afi/e to patch into the WiCEN communica- 
tion system with its own unique cati- 
sign3^\^H3SJA and VK3SJ8— adding a 
new dimension to eTnergef}cy communl"^ 
cation- The important benefits may be 
summarked in (he foitowing three points: 

1. There were times in the tieid when 
communications difficuities were t>eing 
experienced at the various control cert- 
lers. These inadeduades in our own iyt* 
tem mwe overcome by using the WtCEH 
link to pass urgent messages to put own 
Communications Center, which was aiso 
parr of the WtCEU NeL In additioft to thts. 
we were at>i« to provide mote personrtet in 
the tieid than wtouid otherwise have ttmen 
posstbte due to our timited communica* 
tion tacit fties^; this deficiency was over- 
come by attaching a WlCEN radio opera- 
tor to some of our units. 

2. Perhaps the most import ant benefit 
inherent in WtCEN is that it provides the 
ONLY inter-organization communication 
link in existence. Each orgenfzafion has 
its owrr radio system, but none of these 
can inter-communicate, it's all very welt to 
say That liaison between organizations 
must be carried out at hesdQuartars iev^, 
tHtt quite often in the field, time is of para- 
mount importance. In our particutar case, 
we fourtd it entremefy usefui to tie able to 
speedity tlaise direct with the Hed Crosa^ 
the CFA and the Poiir^ on a number of oc- 
casions. 

3. tt amajes meat tirrtes out in ttm ffeld 
fust how long ft takes for one organaatlon 
to receive a reijue&t or a report from enoth* 
er organization working alongside: this is 
the classic inter^fgantiationai liaison 
problem oufiined in point 2 atiove. The ad- 
vantage of the WICEN t^ei was further en* 
forced because the Field Control Center 
was ebte to monitor WICEN traffic, and 
theratora: (a) ihe Brigade was better In* 
farmed of the averaii situation than would 
otherwise have been the case, and (b) we 
were able to anticipate requests for assls- 
tance from other sounds and were thus 
ofganiied by the time tfie format r&Quest 
was received, 

Uke ttm Brigade, the Witness institute 
Cfvii Emer^^ency Network is composed of 
volunteers highly trained for a spastic 
task. The cosf fo ttie community of such a 
dedicated and skilled human resouri^ is 
Irrcafcutatyief The hours of training which 
amateur-radio operators pat into their 
hotiby and ttte weafth of expefience gained 
"on air" would cost miff ions of dollars an^ 
nuaiiy to emulate in a full-time service. 
The community at iBfge is indeed in- 
debted fo the selfless dedication Qf the 
amateurradio ffaterniiy, 

it is distressing in the extreme to team 
that there is talk in some bureaucratic cir- 
cles of fimiting the abiiity of amateurs to 
pursue their hottby of communication artd 
germrat experimentation by ad hoc and tit- 
conceived legislation in relation to anten- 
nas. Certainty a degree of sanity must pre- 
vail m regards to what protrudes into ttm 
air or hangs off a chimneyJ But surely ttfe 
mafrmty of amateurs are sophisticated 
enough to krtow wfwt is socially accept- 
atife in their neighborhood, and the rest t 
am certam would be only too pleased to 
reach a compromise 

The last thing we need is the intrusion 
of new legislation in what has traditional- 



iy been a seit'fuguiating pumuit. A reason- 
able sprinkling of towers artd antennas f9 
a small price to ask tfm community to pay 
tn mtutn for a corps of skilted and dedi- 
cated enthusiasts who provide an unpar- 
alleied, voluntary, emergency service. 

The Brigade looks forward to a long and 
rewarding association with the Wireless 
institute in gerreral and is always happy to 
accept Ihe support and assistarwe of in- 
stitute members which has so readily 
been forthcoming In recent times. 

Yours faithfutty, 
Mf cheat A, Bonacci 




BANGLADESH 

SsifShahid. Editor 

BAnLSulleCin 

Bangladesh Amateur Redfo League 

GPO Sox No 3512 

Dhaka 

Bangladesh 

ANMUAi QENERAl MEETING 
The 1983 Annual General Meeting of 
8AHL was held on Decemt>er 2S, 1983, The 
agenda inctuded setting up a two-member 
committee to make an in-depth study of 
the BARL const ttuticn and suggest 
amendments and bylews^ The Annual 
General Mealing also showed sail sf ac- 
tion al the progress made so far regarding 
Issuance of amateur licenses to Its 
members. 

A ofie-minute silence was obsetved to 
pay homage to the late Victor Cladt. Frest- 
tlont Saif Shahid gave a short speech 
mentioning his personal experiences with 
ViC- His first contact with Vic was in Aprtt. 
19S2, durino his visit to the USA. Saif 
Stiahid was surprised at ttve dlsco¥ery ot 
the amount of krKiw ledge and tnl^^est Vtc 
had about amateur-radio affairs in Barv- 
gladesh. Saif Shahid saw Vic for the last 
time in Tokyo in September, 1983, while 
tjoth of them were ailendlng WARIC. Onty 
two weeks before his death, Vic had writ- 
ten a letter to Self wishtng BARL ait suc^ 
cess. No doubt, amateur radio has lost 
one of its most respected leaders. 

The committee lor 1984 also was 
elected as follows: President, M. Saifud 
Dahar Shahid: General Secretary. Mah- 
butKjl HuQue Khan^ Treasurer, Marxfoor 
Mannan; Memt>ers at LafQe, h]bal Ahmwl 
and Kh, Nazrul Islam. 

BARL ANNUAL DINNER 

Tt^ annual dinner was t>eld on SepierrH 
ber U, 1983, at the HoieJ Sonargaon. The 
chief guest at the dinner was Prof. A. M. 
Pat wary. Vice Chancel Iw of Bangladesh 
University of Engineering and Tech^ 
noicgy. Prof. Shamsuddin Ahmed, Chair- 
man of the Department of Electrical and 
Electronic Engineering of BUET, also at- 
Lended the dinner. 

NEW lARU CONSTITUTION PROPOSED 

With the objective of a n>odem, stronger, 
and more democratic lARU, a new const (^ 
tutton has been proposed The proposed 
constitution contains seven articles, or- 
ganized in a liogkial progression. The con- 
stitution answera the tiaste qi^stions of 
wt>at is the lAfTU. what are Its objectives, 
and how is it Oi^^nUfsdl It also sets forth 
tiK fundamental rights, duties, and obli- 
gations of member societies. The t8 by- 
laws, on the other hand, provvde detailed 
descriptions of procedure and set forth 
additional rights, duties, and obi igat loos 
that are somewhat less fundamental. 

Under the new conslllutlon, the rela- 



tionghip^ between the coniponent pads 
(Wititmn) of the lARU will be changed 
sCfnewhai, Tlie reQional organ izadona be- 
Cdfn^ an inl#gr^l part of the wofldwfde 
body, with Increased agthority and re- 
sponsibility, The "Headquarters" ftjnc- 
tion is transferred to the Administrative 
CounctK, wiHi a m#mtjef society serving as 
Intomational Secretariat to pefform ad- 
mi nist rail ve functions in support of the 
Admmisirati'we Council. Thcr lARU pfi^j- 
deni and vice president will be nominated 
by the InternalJonal Secretartat in consul- 
tation wlllt the Admmi5»1raiive Council, 
subject to ralltication by the memibef so- 
cieties; the secretary will be designated 
by the Internaiional Secretariat. TTie olfi- 
cers may toe n-kemberd of any membef 
society. 

THE WARIC IN TOKYO 

The World Amateur Radfo Iniemsatlonal 
Conference was held In Totcyo, September 
19-21, 1983, cos pon sored by the Ministry 
of Posts and Telecommunications end 
the Japan Amateur Radio League, Inc, to 
commemcrale World OommunicatJons 
Year Sakt Shahtd attended at the In vita- 
tlon of JARU aa their gjest. Besides 
Bangladesh, there were representatives 
fro^ China. Federal Republic of Germany, 
Jordan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, 
Nigeria, Dman. Pakistan, Thailand. 
Trinidad and To4>ago^ the UK, and the 
USA. fn total, about 100 people attended 
the €^5nfere<ice. Th* co<it^efK:e was par- 
ticularty featured by the attendam;e of 
fljchard E, Sutler, Secretary Gerkerai of 
the mj, who paJliclpaled in all con- 
fofer^ce events in addition to his im- 
pfes^lve speech at the inaugural functron. 

Ttie cofiferervce was chained by the fate 
Viciof C. C»ar*i W4KFC. Ttw BARL fepffr 
sentaiive was active tn all conference ac^ 
tnittes and worlicing-group n'leetings. In 
ttie concluding {Plenary session, thte chaif- 
man read out lo the house the news item 
from ttie SARI Buffelin regarding 
Wireless Board approval of amateur ser- 
vice in Bangladesh. Th& house appiauded 
upon hearing the happy news, The con- 
ference adopted the Tokyo declaration. 

GENERAL SECRETARY »N GERM ANY 

Nizam Chowdhury, the founder Generaf 
Secretary of GARL, recenily left Dhaka for 
West Germany for a year-long training in 
telecommunications. Nt^^am is one of 
those fortunate few whose profession and 
hobby are in the same flelil. The Anniiaf 
General Meeting paid rich tritHJte to the 
tsaat actJtfHies of Nizam m promoting ama- 
teur radio in Bangladesh We wish him 
success in his career. 

Mahbobyi Huque Khan took over thie of- 
fice as acting General Secretary for tfie 
nest of thie term after Nizam's departure. 




BRAZIL 

Carlos Vianno Carnffifo PYtCC 
Rua Afortso P»t)a 49, Apt. 701 
20270 fl/o de Janeiro, RJ 
Brazii 

CW operating is much, much more than 
simply traveling through a naw and mar- 
velous International world! 

Put all that's happening to the commit- 
nicalions world together, and Wayne 
Gfeen's ''Never Say Die" editorial tn the 
January. 19&4, Issue sayS It perfect ty, and 
all who really know amateur radio will 
agree that CW represents the fantastic 
guardian, im sure l^nh t>etween Xh& first 



real touch ar>d the final success for red^o 
amateurs. 

In Brazil, a continent ally-dimensioned 
country, curiosity for tNs communication 
may be the cause fof temporary interest. 
ar>d a no<ode Clia^s C was ra&ponaible 
for a new wave of ham^, 80 metefs arxj 
VHP being ttie^r Immediate goal. Also. 
CBefB have come to amateur radio, trying 
Ihla new opportunity with its less-popu- 
lated bands and excited by the news of a 
no^code clas:s. 

Little by litlla, lh«8« newcdmers dJsc^ov- 
ered CW and what It really meant to t^e an 
amateur and to join all ttie wor^derful op- 
tions they had! At the least. CW is a bridge 
to working on antenna pefformarkces, and 
so a strong development in thb field 
becomes a new and exciting challenge! 
And what about electronic keyers? And 
antenna tuners? Arvd what about DX, the 
most fascinating "frlend-factory" in ra- 
dio7 And what about ORP's fantastic sur- 
prlaes? 

Most of all. CW brings you naturally to 
awards, and so ^ou discover you're oper- 
ating not )u$t for operating, but because 
you're looking for something; you have a 
very stong reason to operate in this or that 
direction, aiming to hunt awards of all 
kinda. CW groups In Brazil are doing alt 
they can to provide hams with a tferr>en' 
dous variety of awards, 

Tlie PPG Group has close to 20 awards, 
the Cwaj has almost 10. the CWP is now 
presenting a vefy interest ing one. the 
GPCW in Santos has 4, the ONSP has 
2— the secoTbd possible on^ If you corrh 
(Nate the first — ar>d the ABCW has 2 very 
Interesting awards {orve of them aimed at 
DX operations— the ATWAW). The CWRL 
the GCWA, the CWGO, the CWSE. the 
PACW. the MGG, the MCPR. and all BrazJt- 
lan groMps have ai least orve award wh^ch 
ts CW mode onty. 

We cannot keep up this msh: Last 
month's equipment Is already obsolete 
t>ecause of compel ill on l>etween manu- 
facturars. And costs are going up and up, 
and repairs are becoming owners' night- 
mares! Well, reasonably 'priced equip 
fnent wJ!l pay wonderful dividends In CW, 
and even homemade ORP will bring you 
pennies from heaven at almost no cost If 
iunk boxes are explored. Who can afford 
commercial prices? Only a few, consld- 
efing this mess all around the world! Only 
a very strong force can keep amateur 
radio In many places and in many coun- 
tries. And this force is the spirit of ama- 
leuf radio strengthened and reinforced by 
CW, the most simple, the most efficient, 
the cheapest, and the irtost realizaljte of 
all options In ouf hobby. 

CWP— CW PETROPOLiS GROUP 

Just bOffl in Fstfopolis f'Pet^ Landi," 
named after Bfa^iflan emperors Peter I 
and Peter ll|. ttie Petfopolis CW group is 
the youngest of our CW organizations. It 
is born to stay, accordirig to the bunch of 
'PB radio amateurs ot^osan to form the o|> 
eraiir^g crew for it» CWP Award. 

Tha pnogram Is under the command of 
PYIDFF and PYIOQ (Cfaudlo and Mac^ 
w«ll4cnown DXmen] wittY Ossir PYIYOC 
as right-hand help Beautiful awards, al- 
ready printed, end a well-spread net of At 
CW operators are the hope for an Imme- 
diate BUCCSBS of this new incentfve to- 
wards the use and the practice of the 
moat simple and efficient of atl modes of 
communications among Brazilian and 
other radio amateurs: faithful old CW! 

The CWP Award may be obtained in 
three different cFassea: 

Class One— Work 10 Brazilian cities 
plus two OSOs with CWP members or deh 
egates^ 

Glass Two—Work 20 Biaziltan cities 



plus four QSOs with CWP members or del- 
egates; 

Class Thfee^Work 30 Brazilian cities 
plus six QSOs with CWP memtwrs of del- 
egates. 

Attention — Any CWP memt>ers or del- 
egates can tte used more than of¥:e if 
wofked on diffefent dates or bands! 

&ame rules apply for SWLs. No QSLs 
needed, but GCH apply. Fse: 7 IRGs^ MmW 
to: CWP, PO Box 90415^ 25600 Petropot^. 
HJ. Brazil. 

CWP members: KAiKUH. PP2A0Y. 
PP7JCO. PT2ACZ, PT2GK, PT7WA, 
PY1AFA, PY1APS. PYIAYE, PY1A2G. 
PYlBPa PYtBVY. PYICC PYtOFF. 
PYIDK, PY1DMX. PYtORW. PY^WtWl. 
PY1DYO, PY1ESK, PYlEBN. PYlECI^ 
PY1EWN, PY1JF, PY1KT (YL), PYIMIT, 
PYlOa. PY1PL PY10N. PY1QQ. PYlRO, 
PY1TBW. PY1TG. PY1UBS, PYIURQ, 
PY1UT2, PYIUUW, PY1UWI, PY1VEC, 
PV1VMV (YL). PY1WXU, PYIYOC. 
PY1Y0V. PY12FF. PY2AC. PY2IL. PY2K0. 
PY2MC. PY2MT, PY20I=IW. PY2RLQ, 
PY2RRG, PY3iyiQ, and PY6AMJ, 

All QSOs CW mode only; OSLs valid 
from December 1. 1983, on. 




CYPRUS 

AHs KaponiO^s $B4J£ 
PC Box t723 
Umassot 
Cyprus 

THE LARMACA MARtNA 
AMATEUR STATION, &B4MU 

On tlie south coast of Cyprus there is 
the town of l^rnaca. t>uilt on tf>e iocation 
of the ancieni Greek city of Kit ion, the city 
of one of ttie great Greek philosophers, 
Zenon of Kit ion. i_arnaca today Is a small 
city of al30ut 60.000 people, wMh an 
intemationai airport, a seaport, and a veiy 
modern marina for small boats. 

The Larnaca marina is under the Ju- 
I'isdictlon of the Cyprus Tourist Organ* 
l2ation. and Jt has a radio station for the 
VHP marine band, with 1 0-hour dally opar- 
ation on the channels of imernational nav- 
igation. This station fs assisting the over- 
loaded Cyprus Radio and has handled to 
date ovef 47 distress calls. 

With the Increase of foreign craft in the 
marina and the Incfieasing pressure of for* 
sign boat owners came movement by the 
management of the marina to set up an 
amateur-radio station. After many diffi- 
cuMies, SB4MM fmally went on the air in 
DAoember, 19B2. tt ^s It^only station ol its 
fdnd in ttve eastern Meditefranean. 

The stattoa is operating with the per- 
sonal callsjgn of th^ director of the mar* 
Ina. GlafNos A. Kartolou 5B4MM. Installed 
inside the build ingis of tf>e marina, it has 
■n tC-720A. an automatic tun&r. and two 
simple dipo4es for 2.1B2 MH^ (marir^e) and 
7. {MO MHz. It atso has a "Western 
Yankee" rotary beam for 14, 21, and 2B 
MHz. 

The station Is tlcensed by the Ministry 
of Communications and Works to operate 
also outside the amateur t>and on the in^ 
lernational marine frequencies (2.192 
MHz, etc). In this capacity, the station 
uses the call U\RNACA MARINA. Operat- 
ing dally {except Friday and Sunday), 
transmission starts at 0S30 UTC on 7.040 
MHi with a weather bulletin for the sea 
area tietween Cyprus^ Egypt, and Israel 
{35B.33B-30A.35A). This area has seacraft 
corfiing from the coast of Turkey, usually 
from America. England, Australia, or New 
Zeatand- Ttfere is aJso a lot of traffic from 



the Island of Rhodes^ but more traffic Is 
from Port Said, with boats entering the 
Mediterranearv 

Information given by the station b^ 
sides the WX report Includes exchange 
rates of various Mediterranean count has. 
data on rmvigationat beacons, hazards. 
&ivi radio beacons. Given on request la 
ntedlcaJ advice, minor engine repaif assia^ 
tance, exchange of m^^sagies with other 
stations, relaying, and any other sefvice 
within ttie frameworlc of law ar>d for the 8«- 
cui^ity of human life at sea. 

The position of every craft flitltydl^ 
longitude) as we^l as Itie weather condi- 
tions facing it is recorded in detail. »ne^ 
rouies of all are followed dally, tn c;aae 
theire is unexplained atisence from con- 
taci scfif^utes, the emt>assy of the couiv 
try to which the craft belongs is notified 
and also a genefaf search call la given by 
the marina station. 

At 0900 UTC, 6B4MM interrupts its 
transmission on 7.040 MHz and moves to 
14.313 WHz, taking over from the Interna* 
tlonal maritime amateur net station. IN- 
TER MAR (located in Hannover. Federal 
Republic of Germany, with CM Amo 
DKQSSjI. The same work is repeated here 
for sea areas around Sweden, England, 
the Canary islands, and Port Sudan, in- 
cluding the Indian Ocean, depending on 
condhions. Here, important bulletins &t9 
Issued about yacht thefts, missing boatv, 
p^rtvale fa Ids. etc. 

At 1000 UTC, the microphone goes bach 
10 Amo and &B4MM listens periodically 
between 1000 and 1015 UTC on 21.380 
MHz aiMl from 1015 to 1030 UTC on 2a6Afi 
MHz. 

The freQuency of 14.313 MHz If UiAd by 
slic stations worldwide in turns, one being 
5B4My, on a 34-hour basts for maritime 
mobile radio amaleurs. Many smffteurs 
owia their lives to this comptete^y voiun* 
tary senrlce. 

From the 5B4 point of view, ifm pdbtlcl- 
ty giiffin to 5B44and is m valuable, and 
from the tourist side it is enough to say 
that yachts fotlowing the Cape Town and 
stateside route change their route to visit 
and get to know 5B4-r3nd and its people. 

The sked of 5B4MMp dally except Friday 
and Sunday: 

7.040 MHz, 0830-0900 UTC 
14.313 MHz. 0900-1000 UTC 
21.380 MHz. 1000-1015 UTC 
2S.666 MHz, 1015^1030 UTC 




1 



FEDERAL REPUBLIC 

OF GERMANY 

Rati Beyer 0J3HW 
Opferksmp J 4 
3300 Braunschweig 
Fed^rai fiepadiic ot Germany 

INTRUDER WATCH 

Almost everyorse has e«periencod radio 
interference by stations not belong! n(} lo 
the Amateur Radio Service. But most of us 
Igrvore their transmissions if heard on our 
eKCfuslve amateur-radio bands or sub- 
bands assigned primarily to ham radio. 
The ararage ham simply tunes to another 
frequency and hopes to have more fun 
there. However, this Is not much of a solu* 
tion to the problem. 

The International Amateur Radio 
Union's Monitoring Service, with Its head- 
quartefs in England (Region 1^ and re- 
gional coordinators VV7JIE (Region 2) and 
ZL1BAO (Region 2), addresses the prob- 
lem on a wortdwide basis. A number of na» 
tionahintruder-walch services provide Ihie 



TSMBQAzine * May, 1984 73 



«ua 



fiecesaary fynda mental work. DL4TA< 
EA40K, F6GNP. G5X8, HB9O0, I2AMC, 
LUflDQ, OEfiKOG, ON5A2, PA9VDV, 
PT2J8, and YSIJMS— to nam© a lew— are 
representative 9 of the inl ruder- watch aer- 
vices In thait raapecMve countries. 

The fundamental task of lntrud«r-watch 
services Is the collocimn of data about \n- 
truders on our ham t^nds. Qur natior^ai 
pepresenlativQ, Ralf D. Kloth DL4TA. as- 
sisted by 0J9KR and DK3F0, issues a 
monthly summary of Inimtfflf obsefva- 
tlons contributed by a dozen cof respond- 
Ing ham^, AiMut 500 observations are r^- 
ported each rnonth. including dateinime, 
frequency, type of omission, idfrntffica- 
tiork/itatlonallty, type ot radio service, and 
lufthef remaiKs. Ttm sumrfiaries are circu- 
lated (o ttie t A RUMS sfkd arnong ihe ns- 
tional intmdar^vaicli sarvtoes. and they 
are ft^ed with the German FCC, 

Tllk» dpcurne^tatton aticourages tha na^ 
tlonaf FCCs io discuss the intruder prob- 
lems wlh other cooperatir^ FCCs who 
have iurisdiction over the reported intrud- 
ers. Success fut negotiations, fo* ex- 
ample, moved Radio Cairo Irom 7050 kHz 
out of the 40m band, removed a strong 
second harrnonic emission of Radio Free 
Europe on 14330 kHz. prevented the estal?^ 
Irshrrtent ol a fixed R^ service E»etweeft 
Madrid. Spain, and Malalio. EquatociaJ 
Guinea, on 21400 kl^z. and cor^vinced the 
Ira man press service, IRN A, noHo utilize 
the 40m band lor their RTTY trattamiS' 
sions. The majority of caaea, however, 
St id r>eed to t>e feso4ved. Satislactory 
Muhons require paiier>ce, good wW, and 
(u^operation of the various FCCs invotved. 
A success fut action against an intruder 
needs support by individual hams. The 
reason is simple: No Irtterfering station 
can t>e considered an Intruder if there Is 
no cornplaint. The respective FCC. in turn, 
can reference number tl5 of the iTU regu- 
lations which tolerate the assignment of 
frequencies to another radio service it no 
interference with exist Ing services is In- 
volved. Therefore, as a general rule, do not 
tune away from en Interfering station. 
Bather, f ite a complaint with your national 
Intruder watch representative and give 
him as much information as possible on 
the Irtcldent. Monthly reports are limeiy 
enough. 

But you can do more, For exampISp oc- 
cupy the frequency of the Intruder and 
lero-beei his RTTY or CW signals. 
Chances are high that the Intruder will 
start moving, because many commercial 
and military Stallone use equipment with 
rw more power than ours. Of course, this 
technique is most efficiem for simplex 
transmissions ^transmit/receive on the 
same frequency), byl sometimes It works 
out on duplex (split frequency) Iransmis^ 
sions, too. 

In cases where you are r^t allowed to 
communicate with the intruder directly, 
test your keyer on his treqiiency with tfiie 
toliowing test pattern: 

CUiJTA <OE)ASTOTA {OE>ASTX 
JUIEVDUNARODNOJ UIMmiTELKSKCy 
POLOSY {OEJASTOT POVALUJSTA QSY 
TOT(OEiASVE 

The letters shown in brajckets stiould be 
keyed with no separation between them, tt 
appoars tfiet some people m ine eastwn 
hemisphere mieffpuM this pattern as This 
frequency 1$ part of th« Interna tionaJ radio 
amateur band—ptease OSY Invnediate^y.'* 
Some iniruders have shown appropriate ne- 
aclion. THMia f& this hint to ZL18A0 and 
Ham iledto, Octotoef, tseOi 

in another attempt, DU9AH ran an auto- 
matic test in CV¥ on the trequoncies of 
broadcast stations in tlw 40iti "exclusive" 
amateur-radio t>and. signing wim his 
call sign. His t-kW output signals— laQsl 
fof a piate clisaipation of the finaJ 



ampiifleF no! exceeding 150 Watts— could 
not be missed by potential broadcast 
llstenera. The net result, however, Is still 
lo tie determlrted. 

Some people were ebie to confuse the 
woodpecker and make him move by a 
string ot very-much-shofiened dots from 
an electronic keyer. The "weight" control 
of the keyer did the tiicic The efficiency of 
this measure Is difficult to assess, parti- 
cutarly ir^ the light of the sophisticated 
pulse coding of the wtx>d pecker uncov- 
ered by G3PLX [Wirwiess Worta. Aprii, 
19321 But it is a fact that the woodpecker 
showed up less often when tie had to 
share the frequency with a "string of 
dots*" 

All togettief. there are many ways to 
f}0ht intruc^rs^ ranging from monthfy 
reports to the tntrudief watch to the activa- 
tion of occupied frequencies by whatever 
metfKXJ Is appropnate. In many cases, the 
required effort would take up only a few 
moments o( your operatirvg ttme. 
Wouldn't it be rewarding to spend this 
time to t>elp defend our hobby? 



;^i^ 



GREAT BRETAIN 



Jeff Mayrtard G4EJA 

Ctwsffire 
Engfaiid 

1983 was a milestone year for the FtSGB 
(Radio Society of Great Britain) with mem- 
bership passing 35,CXX} for the first time 
ever. This increase shows a total growth 
In membership of 75% since t»77 and, i 
think, is due to two major factors. 

First, there has been a steadily-Increas- 
ing amateur population in the UK. The in- 
troduction a few years ago of the code- 
free Class B license {Ge, G6, and G1 calls) 
for VHF only (144 MHz and above, to be 
mors accurate) persuaded a great many 
more interested people to oonaidsr seek- 
ing a license. 

Second the increasing awareness of 
technology by "the man in the street" has 
broadened the spectrum of potential ama- 
teurs. There are also two particular teoh 
no! ogy-f elated areas that undoubtedly 
have produced a spin-off interest in ama- 
teur radio. These are computing and CB. 

The UK has the highest per capita den^ 
sity of personal and home computers in 
the world, it is t>ecoming increasingly dif* 
ficult to find someone who does not own 
some form of computer. Although moat 
computer^amateur-radio interact ion has 
tieen from hams beooming involved with 
computers there is evidence to suggest 
that computer enthusiasts have t>een at- 
tra^led to amateur radio by applications 
such as sateiiite tracking and propaga^ 
tion prediction. 

A recent survey of members of BAHTG 
(BrftiSh Amateor Radio Teieprinter Group} 
Inducted questions about computers 
L^ed rvow arMl planned for the (ifture. CH 
the respondents, alrnosi 66% eurrenlty 
have some form of compute system avail- 
abfe for sfiack use. The [vedominant 
model is quoted as being from Sirvciair 
(Timex in the US), although no breakdown 
Is given between model s- BBC ar«d Com- 
modore feature high on the list as welL Al- 
though the numt^r of con^Nitars planned 
fof the future is still only around tw^ 
thirds of respondents, the capabilities 
desired take a jump. Those hams current- 
ly into (^ynputing obviously want more 
tfse of discs, expanded me^Kiry. arid prints 
ers, Ciearty those aspects of amateur 



radio benefitting from computing (AM^ 
TOR, packet radio, sateitite tracking, etc.) 
will be well represented In the UK. 

I think i have mentioned previously that 
CB has tieen the biggest non-event of the 
decade as far aa the UK is concerned 
One-year CB licenses are being allowed to 
lapse in droves^ and new license take-ups 
are very slow. No need to spell out the rea- 
sons for this. However, there has been a 
spin<}f1 for amateur radio. 

Many CBers who original iy scorned 
amateur radio soon realized ttieir mistake 
when legal CB first took off and 27 MHz 
was fitted with the usual meaningless 
wafftt (ID say nothir^ ot ORM. ORN. etc4 
Couple this dJsenchaniment with widely^ 
avaiiabie scanners listening to the trela- 
tlv(B^ calm of two meters, and you have a 
recipe for more hams. 

Some Inleresling side3!nes on UK 
CB— tfw 1964 versior^ of the license spO' 
CJfically prohibits the playing of music 
and the ratransmissjon of radio and televi* 
Sion tKOadcasts; license holders must be 
•00d 14 01 mm^i foadirtg coils can be lo- 
cated anywhefe lin the antenna arKJ not 
only at thetuae (although antenna Fen gth 
fWtiictions remain^ 

Sack to the RSGB. The Sociay Is also 
mov^mg from strength to strength t>ecau5e 
Of the incre^tng needs for amateur radio 
to i:»a effectively and continually repre^ 
sen ted at government arwJ otttef high iev- 
ets in society. Cor^tinuing demands on our 
precious frequency allocations (partio- 
ularly at UHF by tf^ Ministry of DefenceK 
Increasing pressure for furtfwr restiic- 
tions Qf\ operating, regular misunder- 
standing and misquoting by the media, 
the ditficutties of obtaining planning per- 
mission for towers, and the evef -present 
confusion with CB — all of these demand a 
atrong representative body fof amateur 
radio. 

We are fortunate indeed to have such a 
body in the Society, but there are many 
other facets to the RSQB. The most ob- 
viojs, and Indeed most weicome, is the 
monthty f^adio Communication^ RndCom, 
as the Society's magazine Is universally 
known, is not the only UK magazine de- 
voted to amateur radio, but it Is clearly the 
fchest and most comprehensive. 

The Society operates an Incoming and 
outgoing QSL bureau for all members. The 
service is free except for the provision of 
stamped, addressed envelopes with the 
incoming bureau. Outgoing cards need 
only be sorted into alphabetical order and 
dispatched lo the QSL Bureau Manager. 
Incoming cards are handled by a number 
of sub-managers, depending on one's call- 
sign. Ertveiopes are dispatched as soon 
as the postal weight limit is reached— this 
gives the recipient some fiexibilily in rate 
of return. 

The Society represents the amateur 
pcpulation (ir\ctuding nonmemtmrs) in re- 
lations with the governing Department of 
Trade and industry. This riot only includes 
constant lobby I r^ on behaJf of amateurs^ 
but also include* trie holding (by the 
Society} of all repeater and news-bulletin 
station hcenses (UK stati:cms a^e not 
aitowed to esiabiisb personal oi closed- 
group repttatera or to broadcast to non- 
specific recipients). 

The Society's full-tirr^e siati coor- 
dinates a number of voiunieer groups 
tvandling, among other things — 

• planning applicationa 

• intruder watch (regularly reporting on 
ham-band inirudersl 

• IARU representation 

e Radio Amateur Emergency Network 
{RAY NET) 

• repeater woridhg groups 

• pfopagatioo studies 

Perhaps the Isest thing about the So- 
ciety is ttiat all of the above, including 



RfldCom, costs only S2O.O0 per year. En- 
quiries not lo the writer, please, but direct 
to The Radio Society of Great Britain, 
Alma House, Cran borne Road, Potters 
Bar. Herts. EN6 3JW, England 




ITALY 

Uar/o Ambrosi t^ttiQfi 
Vh Stra0eff3, f 5 
2QJ29 Mitarw 
itsty 

Giancerfo kSartGtli mxXf^ 
¥is Bevignani IB 
0016^ fiome 
ttaty 

The most important news from Italy is 
ttie rfew meeting that has been held in 
Rome with the management of the Tele- 
communication Department of the Mlnis^ 
try of R & T. With ttM presence of the Min- 
ister itSXNG), ttie situation has been care- 
futly examined and there is a much more 
hopeful possibility of reaching an agfe€h 
ment. A press release issued cry ttie Minis- 
try talks about '1he possibility of allowing 
harrts to use 2 meters mobile" and "1 
more effective prssance of radio ama- 
teurs on 3.5-3 J MHt" 

Reading between the tines. It does not 
seem possible to go back exactly to the 
previous situation, but probably we will be 
allowed to use 3500-3525 and 3775-3800 
plus another 50-kHz slice, and we will be 
allowed to go out of those frequencies for 
"fepiies to international calls." This way 
nobody will lose face and everybody wilt 
be happy. 

It seems that the change of approach to 
the problem is mainly due to the personal 
interest of ISXNG and to the strong oppo^ 
sition to the new rules by ihe manage- 
ment of the Italian amateur league (ARI). 
All the management has resigned from 
the positions held. 

73 CONTESTS 

Propagation has not been too good, but 
a few of the local bjg guns have par* 
licipated in the contests on 40 and 80, On 
the lowest band, they have not paid too 
much consideration to the new rules and 
they have operated on the 3775*3800 por- 
tion of the band I hat is at the moment off 
limits for us. 

Scores probably will Ije on the same 
level as last year. There are some doubts 
about the rules that are assigning 5 points 
to USA contacts and 10 for the rest of the 
world. It would t>e better to give 5 points 
for contacts with your same continent and 
10 for OX. 

PROPAGATION 

Mayt^e you are interested in knowing 
what happens here in this period of low 
sunspot numbers. If you turn on the rig at 
0700 iocal time, ttie only possit>ility (dur- 
ing January and February) Is 10 go on 40 
And try to work South America or VK. The 
t>arKi opens on 20 at 0730; you can "smell 
it" from the voices of UBSs and UA3s talk- 
ing with each other. A few minutes later 
you start receiving weak signals from the 
Pacific If the call is |ust a bit mofe eicotic 
than a VK or ZL tfie pileups are incredible. 
This situation lasts up to 0930; Ihe sidp 
then shortens and on 20 you have only 
Europe. 

ttie choice is now tietwoen 10 ind 15. 
Ten is very ofl^i compleleiy closed. Whert 
rwt, it's very easy to find \JJB, UL7, AP, A4, 
ar>d 4X4. On 15, the situation is tfie sam* 



?4 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



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426 West Taft Avenue. Orange. CA 92667 
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wllh a few more poaalblllUes to YB, VK, 
9M, VS6, and often iapan. 

At lunchllme, the propaQalJon on 10 
and 15 opens to Africa. There ere few sta- 
tions operal^ng from there . IkjI when they 
dOf their aignDia are atwe^9 very strong^ In 
th« afternoon, 20 meters opens to the US 
via long path and to the Far East. 

H>« evening offers us the US via short 
path on 20, SoiJth America on tt>e same 
frequency, and good opef^li^ge of» 40 to 
the Far East and Alrica, foHowod shodly 
by 90 metet s The US Is wofkaJ>le t>elween 
2300 arvd 0500 on both 40 and 80. 

LOCAL HAM PRODUCTS 

VHF and UHF antennas of Japariesa, 
American, and French ptodudlon are wiery 
easy to find In local shope. A tot of ap- 
proval has beef) ghr«n to soma new tocah 
ly-produce^ antervnas ar^ In pan Ocular to 
a 4^emeni delta toop writh 13 dB of gain, 
a l2-element delta loop for 2 rneters with 
10 dB ol gain, and ttie same one for the 
TO-centimeter barwl A 23^emon1 tOQ p^rt- 
odic from 130 lo 1300 MHr has just begun 
to be sokl white a l2-element fog periodic 
for the T3^30^H7 band (S m*4f to tie in- 
troduced In the market. Will provide you 
with mom information later on, 

SOCIAL AGTtVTTY 

I want to tail you atKHit two examples of 
radio activity in tiaiy. First, ttw new OTH 
of tfm radio club of CivitavecchJa (in the 
Rome area) is an old rail^imclt tttat has 
been moved to the lop of a ZCXJQ-fooi hill ! It 
is a strar>gpe QTH but can be a suggeslion 
for others. In itaty* old raiicars are not very 
expensive* 

Second, nhttt^ is a new en>ergency com- 
munication center tor the Milan county 
authorities. It started ac:tlvity at the end of 
1963. The authorities pfovided atF the lo^ 
gistjcs while the local r actio shops have 
donated rnost of the aciuipment. The emer- 
gency center can work on all bands and 
has Its own repeat era on VHF and UHf , It 
can work RTTY, fascimile, and satellites. 
Beams are available on HF, whUe particu- 
lar attention has been given to the 
SO^rneter band which is the only one 
capable of eompieie coverage of all the 
naiton. The canie'r ^an provide spaco for 6 
operators at the same time- The antennas 
are mounted on top of a 1 SO foot bu^Fdtng. 
A truck equipped with HF, VHF, and UHF 
rigs Is always ready for use. The confer' 
ence room of the cenier can accom- 
modate 500 peopie. 

DX 

The eKpedltion to VU7 LaccadWes hes 
bf^en the event of the month II was very 
easy for us to wofk them, and a few of the 
local DXers have tried to work as many op^ 
araiors as possible as the caiislpn was 
the same for all of I ham. 15 meters was 
Itie easiest band, followed by 20. The ac- 
tivity on 10 meters was llmliedH but vy? 
Sigruis have always been strong. 

The expedition also was spending a lot 
of lime on 40 and BO and this has allowed 
even the small pisioia to work tHem. We 
are rtow watting for Ciip^erton and Ker- 
madec, arHJ lei's hope we will be in a pos^ 
tion to say again it was not too dllf ^uti to 
wofk »t»em, 

T77€ {ex M1Q Is the first San Marino 
ham to achieve DXCC hor>or rptt, arMi rn 
the m«ianttme, he has started to be active 
on liO. You can find hrm around 1 840 
MHj. Me has worked some We already and 
is lool(ir>g fof many more. 

6ml2MQP 



Due to the ilmitsilons set by the Minis- 
try of Posts and Telecom munic^tiorw 
(MFf> to ham activity in Italy, a very heavy 
ill humor has befallen lialian ndk) ama- 



teurs. At the time this column Is being 
written, we have the following situation. 

• The S.S-MHz band is reduced for ama- 
teur use to two thin slices, 3.613 to a.627 
and 3.647 to 3.667 kHz. Looliing at these 
craiy numbers, one can understand that 
the 3.5^ Hz bar>d has praclicaily been 
withdrawn as far as amateurs are con- 
cerned, t>ecause no serfous OX or CW traf^ 
fie fliay tie carried on. referring to the tARU 
band plan, 

• The MPT has assigned the tiand fr* 
quencl^ to other 0overfvrT>eni services, 
mainly to the Defense atKJ Interior Minis- 
tries, Every possible effort has t>een spent 
to exptatn to tfie MPT officials (and to their 
SdHaalled techniciar^) that throwing Ital- 
ian harr^s out of the t>3nd is meaningless, 
because the whole t^and is shared by for- 
eign amateurs with foreifn fiiced and 
mobile services, Tt>ey donl seem willing 
to urkderstand these very simple matters, 
but tfie general opinion is ttiaf (t>a MPT 
has already compromised itself with ttle 
assignment (or the promise) of wido-tre- 
quency subbands into the 3 5-MHz t^r>d 
to gcwemment agencies. Moreover, itw 
MFT persists otistinately to sustain the 
prirK^iple tfiat the ^^sharirig" concept for a 
barKf mearts (fiat it rmjst be divided into 
stibbarvds. 

• The very otd law mtifig amateur activity 
in Italy states that every arnateur station 
should tw instatled in the residence of the 
amateur arxl ttial ttie station may be moved 
only after the MPT has given written per^ 
mission The only allowance is made for 
the T44*MHz-andHjp rigs with powef not 
e»(ceeding 5 Watts, which can be rnoved 
without permission. The law stales 
"moved," but not operated on the way. 
which means that In Italy mobile opera- 
tion is forbidden on both VHF and HF. 

Although such statements make re- 
peaters illegal also (which are installed on 
hiiMops and not in the iicertsee's homely 
for many years Italian amateurs have 
used 144 mobile, playing with the em big u- 
ity of the 144" MHz free^movlng rule. They 
have installed a very efficient repeater net 
which played a big role during the emer- 
gency operations carried on during the 
course Qf the dramatic Frjuli, Sicily, and 
irplnia quakes. 

• The new WARC bands have not yet 
been assigned to amateurs In Italy, and no 
provision has been made on the matter. 
Rumors are that the 10-MH2 band will be 
divided into subbands, following the con- 
cept ot the so-called engineers of the 
MPT, who seem to ignore that interpreta- 
tion of the sharing concept is drtfereni ail 
over the rest of the world and that radio 
waves don't know borders. On this basis, 
no more than 10 kH? will t>e allocated to 
the Amateur Service. 

• For the past 25 years, the Administra- 
tion did not care much when lt*e Italian 
amateurs bypassed some outdated and 
ridiculous rules. In fact, they used the en- 
tire S.S-MHz band according to ihe lARU 
barvd plan, they installed repeaters, and 
tt>ey worKed 144 mobile. And Itie Adminis- 
tration did not movs a firtger in order to 
issue more adequate rules. 

The reasons for the sudden and urvex- 
pected prosecution riampalgn of the MPT 
agair^t amateurs, which started in June, 
1963, are stilt not clear Tight monitoring, 
Inspections, fines, and license suspen- 
sions left thte amateur community 
astonished— the more so because ttie 
Italian ettier Is the mcsl chaoh<c arid un- 
discFplfned in Europe, and amateurs cor>- 
Sidered tftemselves a quiet island tn this 
stonTty sea. Wt^ harass tfie official ama^ 
teurs when lots of illegal transmissiofnt 
are carrted on every part of the spectrum 
wittfoul apparent opposition by the MPT, 
asked tt>e amateurs. 

IM fortunately. In an amergency period 



tike Ihia, ARI showed a iateand weak reac- 
tion. In the past years. ARI settled on Jazy 
and Ineffective poiitical action In order to 
cFear up. problems of Ihe amateurs with 
the MPT. One month ago, a meeting of ARI 
President Rosario Vollero I8KRV. the ARI 
Board, and the MPT officers was held, 
with incongruous results The officers 
confirmed their will to allocate to the 
arrvateurs on the 3,5-MH2 t>and only 100 
kHz. from 3.500 lo 3^600. Such an alloca- 
tion would compel the phone stations to 
invade the CW portion of the bar^, with 
certain reactions from the lARU and 
foreign amateurs. At ttie san^ time, the 
MPT otficera warned that 400 new inspec- 
tors would be put in service soon, and 
they anrKHjnced tigiht inspections and 
Glwcks also on the highways and roads to 
prosecute mot>ile operation The reaction 
of me amateurs and of the aH\ members 
was very heavy. President VoIIgto was ac- 
cused of t>eirvg the man respor^ibie, hav- 
irbg held ttie presfdential charge for about 
ten years. His attitude toward the MPT 
was fudged irtcorvgruous ar^ supine, and 
he was c forged with Inadequate repre- 
sentativen^s ar^d laci^ ot efieciive policy . 
At I hat point, Vollero and the entire Board 
of Directors resigned. 

RufTKkrs around were of plans of direct 
figtits against the Ml^T: Somebody sug- 
gested an iniematiorval mass mailirtg of 
cards directed to the BipubtiC President, 
Sandro Pertini, with petitions on Italian 
amateur rigtits: anott^er claimed that an 
occupation of the 3.5^MKz bar>d with ihtou- 
sands of ham statior»s would be affective. 

Some favorable movement started to 
appear inside the MPT. Maytie some polit- 
icals started to fear unfavorable damage 
to the MPT image, especially as far as 
foreign administrations and the lARU 
were concerned. The Minister of Teteconv 
munications. in person, and the General 
Director of MPT suddenly invited the ARI 
President and the Board to a new meeting 
in the Minister's Gava office on January 
20. That looked lo be a bypass of the of- 
licers who had started the battle. In the 
courae of the meeting Itself, It appeared 
that some recognition was made of some 
requests of ihe amateurs, but it seemed 
clear also that the MPT was trying to gel 
some concessions concerning renuncia- 
tion of a part of the 3 J-MHx band. 

The MPT offered recognition of the VHF 
and UHF repeater net, a provisional allow- 
ance for mobile operation with S-Vi/atl 
maximum Input, a possible early opening 
of the l.a-M Hz band and of the WARC 
bands, with some power and frequency 
limitations, but remained adamant about 
giving only 100 kHz to the amateurs on the 
3.5-MHz band 

The ARI representatives, w^th mem- 
bers' pressure at their shoulders, refused 
to accept the 3.5-MH2 proposed solution^ 
stated many reservations about the pro- 
posed 5-W power fnput maximum rating 
for mobiie use (mainly as far as HF was 
concemecQ, arKf said itiat the proposals 
would be discussed at the next ARi geoer- 
a1 meeting. A turihef meeting wath the 
MPT officials was sei for April 3, 1964. 

Jusi after ttiat date, a bi^ intematiortal 
meeting of radio amateurs on emergerKy 
subjects wijt take place in Erioe, Sicity, 
and lAl^U Region 1 repreaenlaltves, the 
Minister of Tete c o m mun icat i 00s . and the 
General Manager of MPT tiave twen in- 
vited. It appears dear that trie MPT does 
not want to appeal on that ocar^^n as an 
enemy of amateur radio, thus ine political 
pressure on the MPT technicai staff which 
promoted this sort of war. 

Sufely thefe will take place a big battle 
at the next general tneetinf of ARt (which 
will be hetd in Rorrte next March), Presi- 
dent Vollero ISKRV and his staff will try lo 



be reconfirmed as heading the aasoolt* 
tionn showing the partial success of their 
late effort. They will have the regional 
committees (which are the statutory 
organs which represent the members) to 
convince. The regional committees are ol 
the opinion that a more incisive effoft Is 
needed in future approaches to the MPT m 
and this shaii t>e possttMe it the direction * 
of ARi is given to amateurs who are in tfie 
position to be more respected by political 
and administrative personnel of Ihe 
Kalian govemrnervi. TT>at means that they 
should have a very good position as far as 
ties and frier^oships in the right direction 
are concerned. Ttiat does rK^t mean that 
Aflt should be politicised; it means gnJy 
that ARI needs at its head people capabta 
of some degree of polllical maneuvering. 
And ttiat^ in a country like ttaiy. wtieie 
nothing is possible without politics, is es- 
sential also to defend amateur rights. 

mmcxR 




GREECE 

ManifS Dafkadakfs SVIIW 

fiO*2305T 

AthefiS f12W 

Greece 

With the inKireased popularity of per- 
sonal ccxnputers among radio amateurs 
worldwide, some mterest appeared 
among SV amateurs three years ago. Qut^ 
as in every smaii country^ things were not 
so easy and some time had to pass by 
before availability became true for horrte 
computers in Greece, i think that today 
there are more people here selling corn- 
puters Ihan wanting to buy onel 

Nowadays there is access to British 
and American markets and all big names 
plus the duplicates from Taiwan and 
Hong Kong are well reprBsented, I have 
heard, lateJy, that the first Greek-made 
home computer is coming on the market, 
but up to now the only thing I know Is thai 
its name Is Hermes (the Greek god and 
messenger of the god sj. i will iet you know 
when i have more informal ion. 

Of course, most of us want to go on 
RTTY with computers, and since the corn- 
put er/modem combination la cheaper 
than the ready-made unti, thi^ helped the 
Interest to grow a lot Now. there la s 
slight difference in software aval lability 
when someone comes to the point of 
choosmg between an American and a 
British machine. In my opinion, the British 
ones tack s.efipus programs for the radio 
amateur, if th^re are some, very few of 
them appeared \n British ham magazines. 
On th^ other hand, American-made ma- 
chines are more ex pensive, but there is 
plenty of software valuable lo radio ama- 
teurs. Macrot'onics. Kantronics, Micro- 
eo. Inc.. etc., for sure deserve a "bravo" for 
their excellent work in the amateur field. 
In tt%e ham magazines, also, tt%ere are 
irfetity of pmgrams for radio amaieuis; 
even computer mags such as 60 Uicw, 
Rambow, Run, etc^ include amateur- 
related maieriaL 

Although i have 3 TR&80 Model I. level 
II. which has been out of production for 
some years now, i am able slitl to tirKl pro- 
0fldms for it tfsday — and a lot of them. 

D^pite ttie Situation d^seribed above, 
most of my fellow amateurs t^iwe BrrlisH- 
made machines like Sinclaifs ZX^l and 
ZX^pectrum. Arrierican-made machines 
are represented with a few Commodofe 
VIC-20S and e4s. some Tl 96^4Ai> and 
qufte a few of Taruly Models i and IL 



76 T3 Magazine • May. 1984 




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»^Se« Ltstof Afiv0rtt$ers on page If 4 



73 Magazine * May, 1964 77 



By the way, European readers wiil find a 
lot of ideas as well as programs In a col- 
umn named "Rubrlqu© mtcro-lnfof- 
matlque" which appears every month in 
FlEF's {French Radio Union) maBaj:ina 
Both British and American machines are 
supported. Listings are very well printed 
and the people there are doing an ok- 
celient |ob^ 

See you next month. 




LIBERIA 

Brother Donard Steftes, C.S.C. 

EL2AUWB8HFY 

Brothers of the Hoty Cross 

St. Patrick High Schooi 

PO Box 1005 

Monrovfa 

Rept/kfh oi Liberia 

The modern amateur radio is more and 
more push-button controlled. There are 
some amateurs who shed tears as they 
see this happening. The home-brew rig is 
a rare thing these days and these ama- 
teurs are sure that the whole hobby Is go- 
ing to the dogs. At J^ast they see great 
changes taking place and they see little 
that is positive in the direction that things 
are going. 

Traditionally, amateurs have been en- 
terprising and innovative and the modern 
amateur has not lost this qjaftty. A fertHe 
mind and an energetic personality are not 
dependent on how the designers put to- 
gether a radio. They cannot be squelched 
and If they are not building rigs from 
scratch, they are probably designing cir- 
CLilts to track satellites. One thing is cer- 
tain: Amateurs are not sitting around 
doing nothing. As always, they are con- 
tributing significantly In the field of com- 
munications and communication equip- 
ment. 

But here In Liberia we see these modem 
push-button radios from ctuite a different 
perspective. We tendp very quickly^ to 
develop an aversion to switches. With our 
near-hundred- percent humidity, our tropi- 
cal temperatures, and our harmatan dust, 
our switches stop switching. The air-con- 
ditioned home Is not unknown, but not ail 
amateurs have that luxury, 

in this country, the amateur becomes 
the community repair man. "iHe Icnows ev- 
erything about electricity.'' Into his shop 
comes anything that has ever seen an 
electron. When he takes off the cover, he 
finds molded coiia and capacitors, mii- 
dewed circuit boards, rotted dial cords , 
rusted chassis. . .it is very discouraging. 

The amateurs here are ilke amateurs in 
other parts of the world. They iiKe their 
equipment and they do not sit around 
moaning as things deteriorate. They are 
very Ingenious in devising ways to keep 
out moisture and dust. Some build catal- 
nets with handy sliding doors to house 
their radio station. A desiccant inside i^eips 
to control the moisture. Others build 
shelves over their desit or tabie with air 
Spaces under ttiem. One or two weli-placed 
light bulbs provide a convenient low heat 
source, and if everything Is covered with a 
heavy cloth, it provides effective moisture 
and dust controi. 

it seems that In spite of everything that 
is done, it is necessary to polish the 
covers and lubricate the nuts and Doits 
several times a year or they will rust. Dur- 
ing the rainly season, it rains. In Monrovia, 
it will total more than two hundred Inches 
a year. During the dry season, there is the 
harmatan. The desert dust rises to more 

78 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



than forty thousand feet and blows across 
the whole country of Liberia. The natives 
like the harmatan because it tempers the 
blazing heat of the sun, but housewives 
and amateur-radio people do not !il<e It 
at alL 

In the tropical climate, everything that 
switches is going to stop switching much 
too soon. An obvious solution is to goid- 
piate all switch surfaces. Obvious also is 
the fact that so doing solves one problem 
while creating another! 




MALTA 

C. A. F&neGh QHIAQ 
35 Main Str^t 
Atisrd 
Matta 

Since writing my first column In this 
widely-read magazine (June, 19831, ^ have 
the foj lowing to add. Quite recently, Mai- 
tese radio amateurs were given permis- 
sion to own hand-heid, portable^ and 
mobile equipment. The use of this type of 
equipment is restricted in that it has to be 
used forming part of the fixed station at 
the owner's address. Permission to use 
hand-heid and mobile equipment from any 
other location has to be sought by the 
club from the W/T Office and this permis- 
sion may tse granted only on special occa- 
sions such as Fleid Day. The use of mo- 
bile equipment while in motion is strictly 
forbidden. This bit of information may be 
of Interest to those who would like to 
come and spend some time on the i si and, 
because they will be abie to bring along 
with them small VHF rigs which are not as 
heavy as the HF rigs^ The VHF rigs must, 
of course, comply with the local regula- 
tions and must not cover frequencies 
higher *han lABUHz. 

OXPEDITIDN 

Some thirty members of the Malta Ama- 
teur Radio League (MARL) decided to put 
Comino Island for the first time ever on 
the air, This very small Island lies about 15 
minutes by boat from the mainland. The 
call sign used was 9H1MRUA, Comino 
bland has only a handful of Inhabitants, 
There are two very smaii but beautiful 
bays, the Biue Lagoon and Santa Maria 
Bay. The very luxurious Comino Hotel is 
also found on this iittie isiand, and it is 
usually visited by those who are in- 
terested In windsurfing. 

The amateurs who took pari In this ex- 
pedition left the dub premises in Attard {s 
small village situated In the center of 
Maita) at about 0400 GMT. That Saturday 
saw them taking all kinds of foodstuffs to 
last them a whole weekend. They also 
took with them an HF FT-101 transceiver 
and a TS 7000 VHP rig belonging to9HlES 
and 9H1FX respectiveiy. The group ar- 
rived at Clrkewwa at about 0600, where all 
gear was loaded onto the patrol boat 
which took them to the islet. After all gear 
was taken from the boat ^ach one had to 
take Ns share of the load where It was de- 
cided to set up the station. 

It was 0630 when some members 
started to erect the antennas, which con- 
sisted of three half- wave di poles for 10, 
15, and 20 meters for HF and a 12-element 
yagi tor VHF. As there were no trees, erect- 
ing the aerials took quite some time, and it 
was only after a lot of Improvisation that 
they were erected. At about 0745, @H10, 
who started operating the station, estab- 
lished the first contact with Australia, 
with VK2AKP. It was very astonishing that 



Sam VK2AKP was a iVlaEtese natlonai who 
had emigrated to Australia some twenty 
years ago! A lot of European and extra- 
European stations were worked both on 
SSB and CW while many Sicilian stations 
were contacted on VHF. 

AWAFIDS 

The MARL issues three very nice 
awards: the DIP MED Award, the 9H 
Award, and the MAfIL Golden Jubilee 
Award, "me DIP MEO Award is awarded to 
any licensed amateur-radio operatofi 
SWU Of club station on confirmation of 
2-way QSOs on the HF or VHF bands. The 
HF applicant has to work a minimum of 15 
of the 26 Mediterranean countries listed. 
The V H F appl i cant has to work a m I n imum 
of 5 of the 26 Mediterranean countries 
listed. In both the above, 9H Is obligatory. 

Albania, Algeria, Balearic Is., Ceuta, 
Melilia, Corsica, Crete, Cyprus, Dodeca- 
nese is., Egypt » France, Glbrattar, Greece, 
Israel, Italy, l-ebanon, Lilly a, Malta, 
Monaco, Sardinta, Sicily, Spain, Syria, 
Tunisia, Turkey, and Yugoslavia are the 
countries. 

The 9H dl|Dloma Is awarded to any li- 
censed amateur-radio operator, SWL, or 
club station on confirmation of 2'Way 
QSCs with 9H stations. Applicants in 
Europe need 10 points, and applicants 
outside Europe need 5 points. Each QSO 
with a 9H1 station counts as 1 point, each 
QSO with a 9H4 station counts as £ 
points, and a QSO with 9H1MRL (club sta- 
tion) counts as 2 points. 

No OSL cards are required for these dt- 
plomas. Send a certified iist signed by an- 
other two amateurs together with 12 IRC & 
or iJS$2.00 If application is from Europe or 
15 IRCs or US$3.0D if application is from 
outside Europe. 

To commemorate the 50th anniversary 
of the founding of MARL the League de- 
cided to issue a special award to be 
known as the MARL Golden Jubilee 
Award. Period: From 1st September 1983 
until 30th September 1984, This award is 
available to licensed amateurs and SWLs 
(on heard basis). 

To apply for this award, one must work 
9HSODG, the special station, which can 
be worked only once, and any other tour 
9H stations on any band and in any mode. 
Each station can be worked more than 
once on the same band but this must not 
be on the same day. No QSL cards &r^ re- 
quired, only a copy of the log certified by 
the awards manager of the national socie- 
ty or by two licensed radio amateurs. The 
fee for this award Is USS3.O0 or 15 IRCs. 

Applications for any of the above 
awards should be addressed to: The Presi- 
dent, MARL, PO Box 575, Valletta, Malta. 




MEXICO 

Mark K, Jotitfian XE1MKT 
Apartado Postai 42-048 
06470 Mexico, D,F, 

1 guess now and then it would be good 
to comment on some of the most fre- 
quently asked questions In letters that 1 
have received from around the world since 
I have been a correspondent for 73. I be- 
lieve that if a fellow ham or anyone takes 
his or her valuable time to write, they 
should receive an answer, and since the 
answers to their questions may be of In- 
terest to many others, what better way to 
answer than through '73 international''! 

In the February, 1^4, Issue, 1 com- 
mented OKtensiveiy on the matter of get- 



ting a permit from the Mexican govern- 
ment to operate within the country on 
vacation or when passing through. I would 
like to add that your mobile or portable 
equipment should be registered by the 
customs ofhclals at the border or place of 
arrival within the country, showing by 
means of approved documents that you 
are authorized to have and use such. Prop- 
er remarks wiil possibly be made on your 
tourist card so you will not have future 
problems during your vacation. 

For our Mexican readers and for those 
in Mexico on vacation or passing through, 
73 magazine can be purchased at prac- 
tically any international airport in the 
country. In Mexico City, the famous San- 
bourns restaurants, ViPS restaurants, and 
some American bookstores carry 73. 
However, In spite of the relatively recent 
devaluation of the Mexican peso, the cost 
of 73 in Mexico {seemingly high locally) Is 
obviously not high. It sells out at once. 

Whenever I look for a certain issue 
when it supposedly fs to come out, It's 
usually already sold out! I remember driv- 
ing once from one end to the other of Mex- 
ico City only to come home empty- 
handed! (If you have ever been to Mexico 
City, you will sympathize with me.} So, 
Mexico sends its congraf liiations to 73 for 
a very fine magazine that sells just as well 
as the "quick tacos" on the streets! 
Wayne Green certainly does a fine job. 

Some have asked me how I got started 
In ham radio. Well, besides the help I per- 
sonaiiy received from the Juarez City 
Radio Club and the Coatzacoalcos, Vera- 
cruz Radio Club (and especially from 
Mario KrespD XEIMCK)^ I read an article 
called "'Ham' Radio... A Hobby That 
Can Help Others," in the Awake] maga- 
zine (April 22, 1976, issue). I especially^ en- 
loyed it for its exactness and because, to 
me, it was written In pEaIn language for a 
real beginner like myself, Back in those 
days, Awakel printed 9,925,000 copies of 
each issue in 32 languages! So it had to 
be simple and to the point and at the same 
time very interesting, 

it also had a wide circulation in 
Spanish, here in Mexico, If you don't be- 
lieve me, let me send you a photocopy of it 
in Spanish or English. Just send me a 
post a E coupon and a few pesos and I'll 
have it Xeroxed and sent to you right 
awayE Would be nice to have more liter- 
ature for beginners (easy to understand) 
in Spanish as we!i! You never know, 
Wayne Green may surprise us some day! 
That would be wonderful for our Latin 
American colleagues E Think about |t^ 
Wayne! How many other thousands of 
fui:ure hams might get their start In the 
ham world by means of a beginner's fcK>ok 
In Spanish, especially if it were very sim- 
ple and up4cniate! 

Most of the Spanish literature that f 
have seen avail abie is old or just too tech^ 
nlcal for the beginner. (One possible 
reason for having so few hams in Mexico 
as compared to the US?) A beginner's 
tKXjK in Spanish could also aid the En- 
gl ish-speal^ing to learn ham terms in 
Spanish. Then go for your Mexico license 
before coming down to warm Acapuico on 
vacation! it's just a six-hour drive from 
Mexico Cityv and you can stop off in Cuer- 
navaca (known as the ''eternal spring'* 
since it Is warm ail year round) and then in 
Taxco lo buy some good sliver at low 
prices! If you would like to go out of your 
way^ go to the state of Guanajuato, just 
north of Mexico City by a few hours, and 
have a leather case handmade for your 
handy portable! 

Yes, Mexico Is a very Interesting and 
unique country with much variety and dif- 
ferent cultures throughout, Spanish is the 

Continued on page 132 





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See Lis: of Advertisers on page 1 14 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 83 



Hugh Welk W6WTU 
14n 18th Street 
Manhattan Beach CA 90266 



Yagi Fear? 



Forget it. Whether for construction or comparison, 
this Atari program zaps every design problem. 



Amateur-radio operators 
and shortwave listeners 
are always in need of a bet- 
ter antenna or an easier way 
of designing one. Also, 
teachers need a way of com- 
paring one design with an- 
other as examples for their 
students. 

Many superb antenna con- 
struction articles have been 
written over the years. How- 
ever, there is stJif a frequent 
need for a design based 
upon a new frequency or 
number of elements. With 
the aid of the computer it is 
easy to compare design pa- 
rameters for antennas hav- 
ing a differing number of 
elements. 



This program was devel- 
oped on an Atari computer 
for a yagi antenna having 
from 2 to 6 elements and Is 
based upon the parameters 
of an idealized antenna 
model. The formulas used in 
the program have been gen- 
eralized to increase simplici- 
ty. As a result antennas con- 
structed from the program 
data v^ill function as indicat- 
ed by the parameters. Hov^- 
ever, small ajustments of 
element lengths and spacing 
may prove beneficial for 
some parameters and appli- 
cations—particularly if the 
same formulas are used for 
an increase in element num- 
ber beyond six. An element 
spacing of 0.2 wavelengths 



was selected to reduce the 
effect of critical tuning pa- 
rameters. 

To simpiify the construc- 
tion of the program, repeat- 
ing text messages— -relating 
to element name, etc.— are 
stored as string statements. 
Several advantages occur as 
a result- It is easier to handle 
a string as a print require- 
ment than it is to repeat the 
typing of each print state- 
ment Of course, a real ad- 
vantage occurs during edit- 
ing of the entered program 
when a change or correction 
is to be made in the print 
statement By having the 
statement contained within 
a string, a one-time "fix" in a 
single statement represents 



1— For/next loop counter 


S1— Element spacing In feet 


A$, B$, C$, D$. E$, F$, G$, H$, J$, K$, L$, 


S2— Element spacing in inches 


M$, and IMS— Print statements used during 


X— Wavelength In inches 


the printout of the design 


D— Element diameter in Inches 


P$— Temporary variable for entering a YES or 


BD— Boom diameter In inches 


NO response 


A— Changes meters to feet 


F — Desired design frequency 


B— Changes meters to Inches 


N— Desired number of elements 


RBREF- Reflector length 


EN— Element number print selector 


DE/DEL— Radiator element length 


BWL-Lower bandwidth limit 


D1/DD1— First director length 


BWH— Upper bandwidth limit 


D2/DD2— Second director length 


W— Wavelength In feet 


D3/DD3— Third director length 


S— 0.2 wavelength in feet 


D4/DD4— Fourth director length 


Z— Two wavelengths In feet 


3 — Clear screen 


Table 7 - Variables used in 


the program. 



the change for every time 
the statement is called to 
print In addition, a separate 
group of print statements 
was developed for each set 
of elements and for frequen- 
cies above and below 70 
MHz. The frequency split 
was selected to accommo- 
date the change in dimen- 
sions from feet for frequen- 
cies below 70 MHz to inches 
for frequencies above 70 
MHz, 

Dimensions 

Dimensions for the anten- 
na elements, element diam- 
eter, and element spacing 
are established as a function 
of wavelength by dividing 
300 by the selected fre- 
quency in megahertz. Ad- 
justments to the wavelength 
are made to compensate for 
a generalized velocity fac* 
tor. 

The program assumes 
that dimensions remain the 
same for an antenna array of 
2 to 6 elements. With an ele- 
ment spacing of 0.2 wave- 
lengths, dimension toler- 
ances tend to be less critical 
than those arrays designed 
with narrower spacing. Ele- 
ment dimensions are given 
as a decimal for program 
convenience. However, gen- 
eralized fractional dimen- 



84 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



sions are also provided, 
based upon assumed avail- 
able standard tubing dimen- 
sions, 

Caution is suggested when 
selecting a boom diameter 
for m antenna designed for 
a frequency befow 10 MHz. 
Aithougin tine program indi- 
cates a minimum boom di- 
ameter to provide support 
for the array, load factors, 
unsupported boom lengths, 
etc., must be considered. As 
the operating frequency de- 
creases, the computer-de- 
rived boom diameter tends 
to be too small. The pro- 
gram does not restrict the 
design of a low-frequency 
yagi even though it may be 
mechanically impractical to 
build. There are times when 
the dimensions are desired 
as a comparison with other 
antenna types. A cautionary 
note is provided in the de- 
sign printout, indicating that 
an alternate antenna design 
should be considered. 

Feedpoint 

The question most asked 
about an antenna design is 
"How is the antenna to be 
fed?" For user convenience, 
coaxial cable is the most de- 
sired. However, not all an- 
tenna designs will provide 
an unbalanced feedpoint 
for coax. Therefore, if the 
antenna has a balanced 
feedpoint a matching de- 
vice will be required to con- 
vert from a balanced feed- 
point to an unbalanced 
transmission line, A balun or 
gamma matching device 
will satisfy most applica- 
tions. 

Feeding a balanced feed- 
point directly with coax 
causes a feedpoint discon- 
tinuity which will be ob- 
served as a vswr problem of 
about 1.5:1 which cannot be 
corrected by typical anten- 
na adjustments. If only the 
ba I anced/unbalanced d is- 
continuity problem exists, 
little user notice will be ob- 
served if the transmitter will 
tolerate the vswr incurred. 
Corrective action must be 
taken for a vswr exceeding 



CUSTOM DtaiGhflMG A Y^GI ^^iMTtiiNWA 

THIS ANTt:WWA HftS DrVEL.nf^ED ON AM AT AM COMPUTER 
AS CO^FMLED &Y HUGH HELLS M6HTU --JULY 1981* 

THE ^NTENWA'S CEINTER Ff^CQUEiNCY IS 1^6 WHZ * 
THE YAGI IS TO HAME:: S tXEMENTS, 



V THE FOLLDWTWC DTHEWSIONS APPLY TO THE DIAGRAM AT THE eOTTHM QF THE PAGE* 

THE f^ErUECTOR EL£..flEl^T 15 3B,99 INCHES LDWG. 

TH£ DRiyEM ELEMENT IS 17*0-1 INfCHES LONG* 

THE FIRST DIRECTOR ELFMENT IS 35*19 INCHE5 LONG* 

THE ^ECPMO DTRr:CTOR ELEMENT IE 33.02 INCHES LO^^C-* 

THE THIRD CHRECTOR ELEHEWT IS 31 */6 INCHES LONt. 

THE F0RW^5iRD CtAIN OVER A DIPOLE IS APPRUX. 9 D& 
OVER THE FREQUENCY RANGE FROM 141*62 TO 150. 3B MHZ* 

FOpyARD REAM NIDTH IS i^PPROX* <l[l DEGREES AT THE 3 \>B POINTS* 

FRONT-TO-&ACK RATIO IS APPROX* IV DB* 

WHE^ BUILDING AN ANTENWA, nONSIDCiR THE WIND AND EMRO LOADJNG 
WHILE SELECTING THE ELEMENT DIAMETER AND MATERIAL* 

THIS YAGI DESIGN ASSUMES A CYLINDRICAL ELEMENT OF CONSTANT DIAMETER, 

the: optimum eleme;wt diameter is o.zai inches. 

SUGGEST USINK 1/-* INCH MATERIAL. 

the optimum ELFMFNT SPACING FOR HIGHEST FORWARD GAIN 
IS 0*200 WAMELENGTHi 

THE BRACING BETWEEN ELEMENT CENTERS IS 16.1? INCHES. 

SELECT A MlNIMLfM BDOW DIAMETER APPRDX . 1 1/2 TIMES THE ELEMENT DIAMETER. 
WITH THE APPROX. DIAMETER PETNG U*5 INCHES. 

IF THE ELEMENTS ARE ACCURATELY CENTERED DN THE BOOM ( INDUCED CURRENT WILL 
^E!E MINIMUM ALLOWING THE BOOM TO E^E METAL tF DESIRED. INSULATION PETHEEN 
THE DOOM AND THE ELEMENTS. IS NOT REOUIPED* 

THE FEED POINT IMPEDANCE OF A CENTER BROKEN DRIWEN ELEMENT IS LOWEKED 
Ta APPROXi 1D-2G OHMS < BALANCED* WHEN THE ELEMENT IS ENCLOSED 
WITHIM PARASITIC ELEMENTS. 

BECAUSE OF THE LOW IMPEDANCE UALUE, A MATCHING DEUICE SUCH AS 
ft "T'p CAMMA, OR &ALUN HAY BE REQUIRED. 

AN UN&ROKEN ELEMENT MAV ^E DRIVEN WITH A-ifT-'' OR GAMMA MATCHING DEVICE* 

THE FEED POINT IMPEDANCE OF A BROKEN ELEMENT MAY EiE RAISED BY INCREASING 
THE LENGTH-TO-DIAMETER RATIO » MAKING THE DfHUEN ELEMENT DIAMETER SMALLER 
HItl INCREASE THE RATIO* 

A FOLDED DRIVEN ELEMENT ENCLOSED WITHIN PARASITICS ^^ILL EXHIfiHT 
A FEED POINT IMPEDANCE APPROACHING 52 OHHE-£iALANCED * 

YAGI ANTENNAS ARE FAIRLY HI-0 AND OPERATE OyER A NARROW FRESUEWCY 
f!AND AT AN EFFICIENCY OF 75-95 PERCENT. 

THE ANTENNA MUST BE MOUNTED A MINIMUM OF TWO 
WAUELENGTHS i 13>^ FEET ) FROM GROUND AND OR BUILDINGS* 



BOtm I 

REFLECTDR ( 

I 

DRIU ELEM -I 

I 
1ST DIR f 

I 
ZNO DITi : I 

1 
3R0 DIR — — — |. 



FORWARD DIRECTION 

I 

V 



Sample run. 



2.0:1 because a problem ex- 
ists somewhere in the anten- 
na feedline system. Many 
commercial ly-built transmit- 
ters have a vswr detector in 
the rf output circuit to limit 
the power output when the 
vswr exceeds a selected val- 
ue. That vswr value may vary 
from 1 .4:1 to 1 ,7:1 , depend- 
ing upon the manufacturer 

The radiator element of a 
yagi antenna Is balanced 
whether or not it is broken 
(cut in the center). When 



broken, a single element in 
free space woufd exhibit a 
center feedpoint impedance 
of 60-70 Ohms balanced. As 
additional parasitic ele- 
ments enclose the radiator 
to form a yagi, the feedpoint 
impedance may decrease to 
a value as low as 10-15 
Ohms. The feedpoint will re- 
main balanced regardless of 
the number of elements sur- 
rounding it. The specific 
feedpoint Impedance will 
be determined by element 



spacing and radiator element 
length-to-diameter ratio. 

Most baluns have a 4:1 
impedance ratio with the 
highest impedance appear- 
ing at the balanced termi- 
nals and the lowest imped- 
ance at the unbalanced ter- 
minals. When used with a 
yagi, the balun could be at- 
tached to a 'T" match on 
the unbroken radiator at the 
lOOOhm balanced point ft 
would then match coax at 
50 Ohms- A more practical 

73 Magazine * May, 1964 SS 



approach is to use a gamma 
match (one half of a "T' 
match) on the unbroken ra- 
diator. The gamma match is 
a variable impedance trans- 
fomner capable of providing 
an unbalanced feedpoint 
having an impedance from 
about 15 to 100 Ohms wfhich 
is suitable for most coax 
types. 

Antenna Gain 

If an antenna were con- 
sidered to be a point source 
in free ipace where it could 
emit energy equally in ev- 
ery conceivable direction, it 
would then have a gain of 
one. In a practical sense 
here on Earth, a point source 
cannot be achieved. A radi^ 
ating device on Earth re- 
quires a support and v/ill 
also radiate energy favoring 
one direction more than an- 
other. Although a point- 
source radiator is essentially 
impossible to construct it is 
an ideal mathematical mod- 
el for establishing gain con- 
cepts for practical antennas. 

A dipole is a practical arv 
tenna which has a predict 
able and repeatable anten- 
na-radiation pattern which 
can be described in terms of 
gain, A dipole, being reso- 
nant will radiate energy per- 
pendicular to the element 
plane causing very little if 
any energy to be radiated 
off the ends parallel to the 
axis of the element More 
energy is radiated in one di- 
rection than in another, 
creating, in effect, a form of 
energy focusing. 

To further understand the 
concept of gain, consider 
the antenna to be a trans- 
former with a magnetic field 
being generated around the 
radiating element Energy 
will be coupled from one 
element to another if the 
second element lies within 
the magnetic field gener- 
ated by the first element Of 
course, the elements must 
be in the same magnetic 
plane, as can be demonstrat- 
ed with the primary and sec- 
ondary windings of a trans- 
former 

aa 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



Program listing. 



11 

3i 

3f 

4ff 

51 

6» 

79 

«l 

91 

Iff 

III 

Ui 
I3i 

IS0 
160 
170 

100 

190 
200 
31i 
221 
231 
24f 
1^§ 
2«t 
27t 
2tt 
290 

n§ 
lit 
i2t 

140 

I7i 
3ai 

39 B 

4ai 

42i 
439 
440 
450 
460 
470 

4«i 

490 
500 
510 
520 
5 If 
Mf 

ssi 
»«« 

S70 
S00 
590 

fi00 
«10 
fit 

63f 
641 

650 
6fi0 
671 
6fl0 
690 
700 
710 
720 
730 
740 
750 
7«f 
770 
70i 
79f 

atf 

a If 
lit 

010 
040 
050 

060 
070 

oio 

090 
900 

910 
929 



AM HUGH WtLLS JUtir 1911 

GRAPH ECS IB:POSITIOI« 4,2;l>RfllT tfr'TMJ^ 

rqSlTJOH t, 4 t PR I NT Ifti'PHOGHAIt* 

rOR t-1 TO 3000: NEXT 1 

DIPI ASt27KBS(llT,Cf {lSKP$(24Kt«tS7) tr$a3Kt;${33?,iSU4) 
Din JSOn,X$C13),tS(3f),Pi5{31)«Mff34r,r$(lJ 

LPRINT sLPRIlTT * CUStW DESlOMtUG A VAGI AirTfiMMA* 

FOR I-l TO SiPRIItT tVlJCT I sr-tiW-tt EM-0 

LPRIliT jLPRIHT • THIS MtTEMHA HAS MVILOPED OH Al ATARI COMPITTER* 
LPSIKT • A5 CdHPILliD 6¥ HlffiH WELLS W6WTII *-iJULlf lf81#" 
PRIKT 'ENTER THE C£MT£A rREQUENCV TO* 
PHIWT -THE NEAREST 0>L MKI . ' 
'PREO* IS 't J INPUT r 
: PR TUT 'HOW MAHY ELBHSMTS tS THE* 
"YAGI TO HAVE { 2 TO 6 J 7" 
^NUKBER IS "ri INPUT H 
iLPRINT • THE ANTENNA'S CENTER rREOUEHCY IS 'jF|' HHt*' 



PRtHT 
PRIWT 
PRIWT 
PRINT 
tPRINT 



LPRINT * THE YAGI IS TO HAVE *;«;* ELEHENTS." 

LPR INT : DWL=>0 . 97* P : BWL« I NT ( BML* 1 1 » y : aWL-DWL/lff 

iW»!-l*fll*PjHWH>INTfRWR*10i J SSWH^BWH/IOO 

W«3 00/F:5-H«0.2iZ-6.SS2*M 

Sl-S*5*28l:Sl-rHTfSlM00J :Sl-Sl/f00 

S3«S*39,37;52«IIIT{$a*lttl:&2-S2/l0t 

X*ll8fll/F 

IF r<lf THEN I>«X*1.2£-0 3iCOTO 2S0 

IF F<-J3 THEM D*X*2.fi-tl;GOTt3 200 

IP r>23 THEM D-3l'2,9E-03:GOTO 260 

D*lirT(I>*lOii> :D«I>/lf00 

IF F<«ltff THEN BD>0*1.5!0OTC 120 

ir P<«2ff TiER BQ-D«2il*0T0 120 

IF F>20t THEIl eD*D*l,&idOTO 120 

OD*IIIT(SD*10-i>0.5) :BD-iI>/l* 

A"l,3OltR*19>3T:RE-W*O.4O2:DE-l4'*0.4&79iOeM-W*f .415 

DO2-W*i.4ll7:OTl3-M*0*192«:DD4-lif*0,37 297 

LPfilNT :LPIIIKT * * THE POLLOWIHG PlttEMSIOMf APPLY TO 



THE DIAGRAM AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE,* ; LPR INT 



AS-* 

OS-* 

ES-* 
FS-* 
0$*" 
H$-^ 

RS-" 

LS-- 

MS** 

MS-' 

IF U 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 



TRE REFLECTOR ELEI4ENT IS * 
FE£t LONG.'iCS-* INCHES LOMC.* 
THE I^RrVEH ELEMENT IS ' 
THE FIRST DIfttCtOR ELEMENT IS • 
TU£ SECOND DIRECTOR ELEMENT IS 
THE THIRD DIRECTOR ELEMENT JS * 
THE FORkfARD GAIN OVER A D I POLE 
OVER THE FRE(^UENCY RANGE FROM " 
FORWARD BEAM WIDTH IS APPROX.* 
D£GR£ES AT THE 1 DB POINTS^* 
FRONT- TO- AC R lUlTIO 
THE fOURTB DIRECTOR 
'2 THEli 550 



IS APPRO*** 



IS APPROX. " 
ELEMEITT IS * 



kt«l 
11-4 
U-5 
M-G 



TH£II 
THEN 
TREII 

TBEM 



71t 
93t 
1190 
149f 



GOTO Of 

FOR 1*1 TO StLPEIMT ;NEXT t 

«Iit 1 EtJmttXTS 

IF r>70 TSEli 63t 

1tEF-liE*A;G0Sira 23lt 

DEL-DE"A:COSUR 2340 

LPRIItT A$;REr;a$ 

LPRINT DSfDELjBS 

GOTO 660 

R£F«RE«i:GOSyt 2110 

D£L-DE*0:GOSUB 2140 

LPS I NT ASjHEFiCS 

LPaiMT DS;D£L;CS 

LPRINT : LPRINT H? r ' & D&" 

LPRINT JSjHWLf' TO 'lOWHj* MHZ. 

LPRINT : LPRINT K$t* 70 ^fl,$ 

LPRINT : LPRINT M£}* B D».* 

GOTO 1020 

it EM 1 ELEMENTS 

IF f>70 THEN etf 

ftEF-?{f*A:GdSU0 23tt 

DEL-DE^AiGOSUO 234f 

Dl-&Dl*A:GOSUa 2370 

LPftUrf A^fREF^a^ 

LP? INT DSrDELiBS 

LPRINT ESfDltaS 

EM* 3 

GOTO 070 

REF-RE*a:COStJB 211t 

iy£L*DE*R:GaSUB 214t 

D1-D&1*B:C0SUB 137t 

LPRINT A$;A£F;C$ 

LPRINT DSrDELrCS 

LPRINT £^7D1;C$ 

LPRINT : LPR INT HSi* 7 Di' 

LPRINT JflfBWLf* TO "jtWlif* Wfl 

LPRINT : LPRINT KSr" 51 *pL$ 

LPRINT ; LPRINT MSi* It DB*" 

EN-3 

GOTO 1820 



910 

940 

950 

960 

970 

9&0 

990 

1000 

I0tt 

1030 

ltl0 

IttO 

1150 

1060 

1070 

1000 

1090 

lltt 

Hit 

1120 

1130 

1140 

1150 

1160 

1170 

1180 

1190 

HOB 

1210 

122^ 

izie 

135f 

xiet 

127f 
12flt 

l2»i 
llfi 

1110 
1120 
1130 
1340 
1150 
13i0 
I37f 
1310 
1390 
1400 
1410 
1431 
1430 
I44« 
14^1 
1460 



K£N 4 ELEMENTS 
IF F>70 THEN 1950 
R£F-R£*A:GOSua 2110 
PEL*DE*AiCOSUB 2340 
D1-DD1*A:G0SUB 2170 
D2-DD2*A:COSUB 2400 
LPRINT A5;ft£PjBS 
LPKINT DS;D£L;BS 
LPRINT E5fDl;BS 
LPRINT F$jC3;&$ 
EN-4 

GOTO 1110 

REF--nE*B:COSlfi 21Ii 
DEL-DE*B:GOSVB 2 340 
Dl-DDi*B:GOSUB 2170 

D2-tia2*B:Gasi^ 3#tf 

LPRINT AS,R£r:CS 
LPRINT D$;DEL;CS 
ES.'DlfCS 
rSjD2jCS 
: LPRINT nt}* 
JSjBWLi" TO 
: LPRINT KSr" 
I LPR INT MS I* 



LPRINT 
LPRIHT 
L PR I NT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
EN-4 

GOTO 1820 
REM & ELEMENTS 
IF P>7i THEN 1330 
R£F-RE*AtGOSUB 2310 
DEL*DE*AjGOSUB 2140 
D1«DDI*A!G0SLJB 2370 
D2-DD3*A£GOSUB 24i0 
D3*&D3*A:GOSUB 2430 
LPRINT ASjREF^BS 
LPRINT OSfD£L|0$ 
ES?D1;BS 
F$rD2iBS 
C^fDSfftS 



e Da' 

jtWIll* MBI*" 
4S "jLS 

12 I>B." 



LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
tN-5 

GOTO 1410 

REr*R£*S:COSUR 

DEL*DE*1 

dl-DDl*B 

02aDP2*B 

&3«DD3*fi 

LPRINT 

LPRINT 



231ff 
234« 
2171 
3400 
2410 



LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 



005UB 

G&SUB 

COSUB 

GOSUB 
ASiREF;CS 
or^DELiCS 
E$iDliC$ 
F$;D2iCS 
GSlQlfCS 
:LPRINT H$7* 
JSlBWL;' TO 
J LPRINT KS;' 
: LPRINT n%j' 



9 DO- 
rBWMf* HH1 
40 'ih$ 
19 DO.* 



A higher antenna gain is 
exhibited when more of the 
radiated energy is coupled 
from the first element to the 
second by focusing (con- 
centratingj the radiated en- 
ergy. It is assumed that the 
radiated-power value remains 
constant and only the radia- 
tion pattern is manipulated. 
Since there is only a given 



amount of magnetic field 
generated around the first 
element, it is necessary to 
concentrate the magnetic 
field into the area [or direc- 
tion) of the second element 
The process is similar to 
focusing light energy with a 
reflector A concentration 
of the field into one area has 
the same effect on the sec- 



ond element as if the radi- 
ated power had been inr 
creased. Antenna gain has 
been achieved by focusing 
the radiated energy. 

A yagi antenna achieves 
gain by placing parasitic ele- 
ments around the radiator. 
Each parasitic element is 
nearly resonant at the de- 
sired operating frequency of 



1480 
1491 
ISli 

isii 

lS2i 

1511 
154f 
1551 
1561 
ISTt 

i^iE 

1S9I 
1611 

iGlt 

I6t§ 
1611 
164fl 
16Si 
1660 
1670 
1600 
1690 
1710 
1710 
1710 
1730 
1740 
1751 
1761 
1771 
1700 
l?9t 
1100 
1010 
1021 
1831 

ia40 
ia50 

1S60 

1B70 
U^B 

1900 
1910 

19 2 i 
193S 
1940 
1951 
196t 
1970 
198fl 
1990 
3000 
3010 
3020 

20 31 
3041 
2050 
3060 
2070 
2080 
2090 
2100 
2110 
2120 
2110 
2141 
2159 
2160 
2170 
21B0 
2191 
2200 
2210 
2230 
2230 
224 
235t 
23if 
2170 
2200 
2290 
2300 
2310 
2120 
2330 
2340 
2350 
2 360 
2371 
23S0 
3391 

2410 
2421 



EH* 5 

GOTO 1010 

REN 6 ELEMEItTS 

ir r>7f TBEH 1650 

mer-ne^AsGosue 2310 

C»tL-DE*A:CQSUl 2340 
0|-I1DI*A:GOSUB llTf 
&3-DQ3*A:<;ciSUB 24ff 
D3-DD3»A:COS90 243t 
£)l-D£»4*AiCaSUB 2460 
LPRIHT l^$ifiEF;BS 
LPBIWT D$;DELfaS 
E$jDl;eS 
F$;D2;BS 
C5rD3;B$ 
H$7D4tB$ 



L PR I NT 

LPAItIT 

LPRIKT 

EN-6 

GOTO 1770 

REF*|lE»B:GOSUB 

PEL-DE*BiG0SU5 

Dl-DDl*BiGOSUa 

D2-DD2*6:00SIIB 

D3-DD3*BtCOSU& 

E»4-P04*lsGOSUB 



2310 

2370 
2400 
2430 
24E0 



LPfttHT 
LFIttllt 
LPftlUT 
LPftrttT 
LPJIIMT 
LPftlKT 
LPAINT 

Lpaiirr 

tPHINT 

EM- 6 

LPRI«T 

LPRlNt 

LPRINT 

LPfliNT 

LPHIWT 

IT 

ir 

D<-0,5 

D<»0.6 

D< -i.fi 

D<-U2 

D<-1.6 

tK-1.8 

D< 

0< 



AS;HBF;CS 
D$;DEL;C$ 

rSj02rCS 

N5rD4;C3 
: LPAINT dSi* 
JSjBICLj- TO ' 
iLPBIHT ItSr* 
:S.PflIKT HSi* 



11 
t 

Iff 






2430 

244f 
2450 
2460 

2470 
24B0 

2490 
2Sf0 

2510 
252ff 
2530 
2540 

3550 
2 560 
2570 
25Si 
259^ 
S60« 
2616) 
2621 
2630 
2§40 
2650 
2fi60 
2670 
3681 
2S9f 
2700 
27 If 
3721 



B3-tl*T(O3*l0iJ 

D3-D3/10t 

AETURU 

D4-Ilit(D4*i00) 

D4-!>4/ltff 

RETUftH 

BEf^ PRINT ¥A€r OtAGRAIt 

LWUXT • 

LPRiNt ■ 

L PR IDT - 

LPmtUT • 

tr EN>-3 THiK tPRIMT • 

IF EN>*3 THEli LFftlKT * 

IF EM>«4 THEN LPRIHT * 

IF EN>-€ THEN (.PRINT " 

IF EN>*5 THEN LPRINT * 

IF EN>-5 THEN LPRINT * 

IF EN>-6 THEW LPRINT " 

IF BN>-6 THEf* LPRIWT * 

LPftlMT :LPftlNT j LPRINT 

LFFIIHT " 

LPRINT " 

LPHIHT 

PAINT 

Pit INT 

PRINT 



REFLECTOB 



DAIV SLEK *^ 




1ST pia 



2N0 01 R 



3RI> DIR 



4r[] DIR 



I' 

r 



I LPRINT i LPRINT 
"I'iPOR 1-1 TO 10 E pa INT I NEXT I 

DO YOU WANT ANqTHIR OESIGM?" 
i PRINT " EKTER Y/N 'ji INPUT P$ 



PRINT 
PBIMT 
PRINT 



!*jFOR I-l 



IF PS-'lf* THEN P«£NT ■ f " iCOTO 7i 

TO 10: PRINT sNEXT 
B¥E B¥E III* 
PBIHT 



sPHIHT 



ELEMENT DIAWETER 
* bfHEtl BUILDING AM A^TTENNA, CONSIDER THE WIND AND SIRD LOADING* 
' ipfHILE SELECTING THE ELEMENT DIAMETER AND MATERIAL.* 

:LPRIHT * TNIS YACI DESIGN ASSUNES A CVLlNDAlCAL ELEMENT OF CONSTANT 
: LPHIHT * THE OPTIKUN ELEMENT DIAMETER IS •;Df* INCHES,* 



SIAHETER. 



D<*«0.135 THEN LPRINT 
D<-0»3 THEN LPRINT ' 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 

THEN 
2 THEN LPRINT ' 
2.3 THEN LPRINT 



LPftlNT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 

LPRINT 
LPRINT 
LPRINT 



• SUGGEST USING 1/fl INCH MATERIAL, *! GOTO 200ff 
SUGGEST USINC 1/4 INCH NATERIAL. * tGOTO 200fl 

3/a INCH MATERIAL.-: GOTO 2001 
EITHER 3/B OR 1/2 INCH MATERIAL. " j GOTO 



3 

m 



US INC 

USING 

USING EITHER 

USING EITHER 

USING EITHCR 

USING EITHER 

USING EITHER 
SUGGEST USIHG CITHER 1 
■ SUGGEST USING EITHffR 
THEN LPRINT * ■ THE MATERIAL REOUIRCD FOR THE VAGI 
SUGGEST CHOOSING A DlFFeftENT J^NTENNA DESIGN. ' 



SUGGEST 
SUGGEST 
SUGGEST 
SUGGEST 
SUGGEST 
SUGGEST 
SUGGEST 



1/2 Oft 5/a 
5/S OR 3/4 
1 Of? 1 1/4 
1 1/4 OH 1 

1 L/2 QR 1 
3/4 OR 

2 OR 2 



2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 



INCH MATERIAL.- iGOTO 

INCH MATERIAL.*: GOTO 

INCH MATERIAL»":GDTQ 

1/2 INCH MATERIAL. "iGOTO 2l0i 

3/4 INCH MATERIAL.*: GOTO 2000 
2 INCH MATERIAL," i GOTO 20f0 
1/4 INCH MATERIAL, "rGOTO 2000 

MAY iE TOO HEAVY TO SE SELF SUFPOATING. 



ELEMENT SPACIWG FOR HIGHEST FORWARI) CAIN* 



BETWEEN ELEMEIIT CENTESS IS "jSU'rEET. 



*|S3f* INCHES. ■ 
1 1/2 TIUBS THE 



ELEMENT 01A.*1ETER. 



IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 

IF 0>2 

LPRINT 

REM BOOM 

LPItINT :LFflIliT " tHE OPTIMUM 

LPRINT - IS #.200 HAVE LENGTH 

IF F>70 THEN 20€ff 

LPRINT :LPHIMT * THE SPACING 

GOTO 2f7t 

LPRINT ; LPRINT * TItE SPACING BETWEEN ELEMENT CENTERS IS 

LPRINT : LPRINT ' SELECT A MINIMUM BOOM DIAMETER ApPftOX. 

LPRINT * WITH THE APPROX. DIAMETER BEING *|tO|" INCHES. - 

LPRINT i LPRINT ^ IF THE ELErt^NTE ARE ACCURATELY CENTERED ON THE BOC»l^ INDUCE© CWfiENT WILL* 

LPRINT ' BE MINIMUM ALLOWING THE BOOM TO iE METAL IF DESIRED* INSULATION BETNEEN' 

LPRINT • THE &0OM AND THE ELEMENTS IS NOT HEQUIREO.* 

LPRINT :REM FEEDPOINT Z 

LpftINT - THE FEED POINT IMPEDANCE OF A CENTER BROKEN DRIVEN ELEMENT !5 LOWERED- 

LPRINT ■ TD APPROK. 10-20 OHMS f BALANCED) WHEN THE ELEMENT IS ENCLOSED* 

LPRINT ■ WITHIN PARASITIC ELEMENTS.* 

LPRINT : LPRINT " BECAUSE OF THE LOW IMPEPANCE VALUE* A MATCHING DEVICE SUCH AS* 

LPRINT ■ A 'T' g CAMMAj OR BALUN MA¥ BE REQUIRED." 

LPRINT r LPRINT * AN UNBROKEN ELEMENT MAY BE DRIVEN WITH A 'T* OR GAMMA MATCHING DEVICE.* 

LPRINT : LPRINT ' THE FEED POINT IMPEDANCE OF A BROKEN ELEMENT MAY BE RAISED BY INCREASING" 

LPRINT ■ THE LENGTH -TO- DIAMETER RATIO* MAKING THE DRIVEN ELEMENT DIAMETER SMALLER' 

LPRINT ' WILL INCREASE THE RATIO.* 

LPS INT t LPRINT ' A FOLDED DRIVEN ELEMENT ENCLOSED WITHIN PARAS I TICS WILL EXHlSlf 

LPPINT - A FEED POINT IMPEDANCE APPROACHING 52 OHMS-BALANCED. * 

LPRINT X LPRINT " YAGt A^fTENNAS ARE FAIRLY Hl-Q AND OPERATE OVER A NARROW FREQUENCY* 

LPRINT * BAND AT AN EFFICIENCY OF 75-95 PERCENT." 

I-INTrZ«lil :Z^Z/10 

LPRINT : LPRINT ' THE ANTENNA HOST BC MOUNTED A MINIMUM OF TWO' 

LPRINT - WAVILENGTICS { "jZj* FEET ) PftOM GROUND AND OR BUILl)|W;S«- 

LPRINT i LPRINT ; LPRINT 

GOTO 3490 

R E F-1 NT fHEF*l*0 J 

REF-REF/lii 

RETURN 

DeL*INTmEL*lf0| 

DEL-DEL/J0i 

RETURN 

DI»INT(D1*X00J 

DI-O1/10B 

RETURN 

D2*INT(OZ*i00) 

D2-OZ/100 

RETURN 



the radiator and will absorb 
some of the radiated energy. 
By being nearly resonant, 
each parasitic element 
creates a phase shift in the 
energy it re-radiates. Energy 
radiated rearward creates 
an out-of'phase condition, 
reducing the actual rear- 
ward radiated energy. In the 
forward direction, however, 



the phasing is such that 
energy radiated by each ele- 
ment is in phase and is rein- 
forced as the energy moves 
fon^vard The reinforcement 
process creates the effect of 
gain through fonvard-power 
concentration. 

tn creating antenna gain 
by power concentration in 
the forward direction, the ra- 



diated energy in other direc- 
tions (areas) around the an- 
tenna is reduced consid- 
erably. If a measurement is 
made of the energy radiated 
in the forward direction and 
the energy radiated rear- 
ward, an antenna's front-to- 
back ratio would be deter- 
mined. The front-to-back ra- 
tio of an antenna Is further 



J- 



r 

FORWARD DIRECTION" 



indicative of its gain and abil- 
ity to focus energy. 

Beamwidth 

Beamwidth is another mea- 
surement of an antenna's 
ability to focus energy. The 
measurement is made by 
first establishing the anterv 
na pattern which depicts 
the relative amount of ener- 
gy radiated in a single plane 
around the antenna. The 
highest concentration of er^ 
ergy in one given direction 
is the forward direction. 
Beamwidth is determined 
by shifting angularly to 
either side of the foHA'ard 
position where the radiated 
power is down to one-half 
( — 3 dB) of the forward- 
power |x>sitron. The in- 
cluded angle between these 
two half-power points repre- 
sents the beamwidth. 

As the gain of an antenna 
increases, the beamwidth 
will decrease, indicating a 
higher concentration of en- 
ergy in the forward direc- 
tion, During antenna adjust- 
ments, a false sense of secu- 
rity can be developed if only 
beamwidth is observed as a 
gain factor Yagi antennas 
have been known to de- 
crease their beamwidth dur- 
ing adjustment while dis- 
persing an increased amount 
of energy into a parasitic 
lobe (a power output in a di- 
rection other than the de- 
sired forward direction). 
When taken together, for- 
ward gain, beamwidth, and 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 87 



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fronttoback ratio represent 
the performance parameters 
of an antenna. 

General 

Because of the rather 
lengthy printout for each an- 
tenna design, it is recom- 
nnended that a printer be 
used rather than attempting 
to read the data from the 
screen. However, if a printer 
is not available, the LPRINT 
command may be changed 
to PRINT. To stop the screen 
from scrolling long enough 
to read the data, an INPUT 
command may be inserted 
into the program. It is sug- 
gested that INPUT P$ be in- 
serted about every 20 screen 
printout lines. Pressing RE- 
TURN (ENTER) will allow the 
program to run up to the next 
INPUT. 

A typical five-element de- 
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to show how the printout 
should look when the pro- 
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To run the program, it is 
necessary to enter only the 



center operating frequency 
and the desired number of 
elements (2-6). As an exam- 
ple of what happens, if two 
elements are selected, the 
program will assume the ele- 
ments to be the radiator and 
the reflector. Additional ele- 
ments will be added as 
directors numbered one 
through four with number 
one being closest to the radi- 
ator; number four will be the 
farthest away from the radi- 
ator. An antenna diagram is 
printed at the end of the 
design printout to provide 
clarity of construction. 

All elements are mounted 
in a single plane along a 
boom, with each element 
centered on the boom (or 
through the boomj to keep 
the induced boom currents 
to a minimum. Material for 
the boom may be wood, 
metal, or fiberglass, with on- 
ly strength and weight being 
the criteria. Aluminum tub- 
ing has proven to be a suc- 
cessful material for both the 
boom and elements. ■ 



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KANTRONICS HINZ-READER CW/RTTV^A9CII. , * 239- 95 

MFJ-iaOO CM DNLV COMP. INTERFACE* ,.S9,^ 

JTFJ-1224 CW/RTTV/ASCII COHP. I NTERFACE. . 38 . 95 
MFJ-1230 HAhSOFT FOR VIC-20 COMPUTERS ... 39 - ?3 

CLOSEGUTS-PRICES GOOD WHILE SUPPLV LASTS 

DEBCO ACCSl AC QUICK CHARGER FOR S-i....35.O0 

DEBCO DC^Sl DC QUICK CHARSER FDR S-l.... 30.00 

DEBCO DCC24O0 DC OUICK ChMRGER TR-2400. . 50 . OO 
HV'SAIN HQ-2S 10-2OM QUAD. ........... .234.00 

HV-GAIN 6«i-aS 6M 6 ELEMENT BEAM. ...... .90.00 

HY-GAIN 5DBQ lO-SOM TRAP DOUBLET.. B7.00 

INI^RSPACE 20 AMI' POWEP SUPPLY .. 91. OO 

KEIWOOC ST-1 DESK CHARSER FOR TR-240O . . , 72 , 00 

SWAN HFP1200 MF MOBILE B*«/WATTMETER 37,50 

TRAC Tei33 ELECTRONIC KEYER. . . . x .41.93 

TRAC TE2e4 MEHORV ELECTRONIC KEYER ,47.30 



2 PCTER RAOJOS 

AZDEN PCB-30O FM HANDhELD. 3W, 8 MEM. .... 259.^5 
AZDEN PCS-4000 FM MOBILE, 25W. 16 ^EM. . . .2&5.?5 

KDK-203C FM MOBILE, 23W, 11 MEMORY.. 239.93 

KDK-2033 FM nOBlLE-2SW- 1 1 MEMORY . 279.95 

SANTEC ST-142 FM HANDHELD. 3. 5W. lO MEM. .279-93 
SANTEC ST- 1^4 FM HWJDHELD, 3. SW, lO MEM. .262.95 
TEMPO S-l 5 FM HANDHEtOt 5W,3 MEM, ,..-... 242. 95 
TEMPO S-35T S-IS WITH 16 KEY TONE PAJ>. , 26^15, 95 
TENTEC 2S91 FM HANDHELI^ . 2 . 3W . 1 MEM. .. ,262. 95 
t«tt««»ttt*«t«t«SUPER SPECIAL*«»tf«at*ttt*«¥> 
TEMPO S^IT 5-1 WITH 12 KEY TONE PAD. . . . 199. 95 
PRICE ON S-l Ic S-IT INCLUDE 5/e WAVE SUPER 
STICK n «r RUBBE?^ DUCK WHILE SUPPLY LASTS 



2 METER HANDHELD ^M:;CEGS0RIEB 

HT-BAT SPARE BATTEftY FOR PCS~300, . . . . -24. 95 

HT-ESM SPEAKER MIKE FDR PCS-300. , , , . , ,26. 9S 

HTHLC LEATHER CASE FC3R PC3-30O 26. 93 

ST 500B3 SPARE BATTERY FOR 3T-144. ..=, .i .22. 93 

SM-3 SPEAKER Ml KE FDR ST-1 44. .... . . .31-95 

ST^C LEATHER CASE FDR ST- 144.- .31.95 

ST-4QC AC CHARQER FOR ST-144 t4-&f«[> . , 6J ,93 

ST^SBC AC CHARGER FOR ST-144 <6^SHR> ,, 27,95 

ACH-15 AC QUICK CHARGER FOR S-tS 52,95 

CC-15 LEATHER CASE FOR S-i5, .., 21, V5 

OCC-15 DC b CHARGM4G CORD FDR S-19. . . . 12. 95 

BP^13 SPARE BATTtRY FOR S-IS. ....... .25- 93 

Htt-lS SPEAKER MIKE FOR S-15 ,,,,30,93 

OTHER ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE PLEASE CALL 

2 METER BASE ANTEMNA3 

SUTT^RNUT 2MCV S/B WAVE TROMBONE. *.-,,. -29.93 

BUTTERNUT 2MCV~3 5/B SUPER TROMBONE- ,,, .34. 50 

CUSHCRAFT ARX2B RINQO RANGER II...--..._34,00 

CUSHCRAFT A144-11 11 ELEMENT BEAM. . , . . . ,44, 25 

CUSHCRAFT A147-'ll 11 ELEMENT BE/M. . - . . . .44. 25 

CUSHCRAFT A144-20T 20 ELEMENT TWIST, ,*, ,&7, 95 

CUSHCRAFT A147-20T 20 ELEMENT TWIST 81.93 

CUSHCRAFT 214B li 214FB 14 ELEMENT BEAM. .74.93 

CUSHCRAFT 32-19 19 ELEMENT BEAM, « i . , - . . -98. 95 



2 METER MOBILE ANTENNAS 

AVANTI AP151.30 1/2 WAVE "ON IsLABB". 

CUSHCRAFT AMS-147 MAONET MOUNT, . iw-,,* , 

CUSHCRAFT ATS^147 TRUNK MOUNT.......... 

HUSTLER SF-2 5/0 WA^E 3DB GAII^f 

HUSTLE;R CB-144 5/8 WAVE 5.2DS SAIN- , _ 

VALOR CX-144 5/8 HAVE 3DB GAIN 

2 METER AMPLIFIERS 



.29.93 
.27.95 
.27.?3 
. 10.95 
.27.95 



MIRAGE B23 FM/SSB 2M IN 30W OUT. . - , . , -75. 00 
rtlRAQE BiOB FM/SSD lOW IN SiOW OUT. . - . 151 . 00 
MIRAGE B1016 FM/SSB 10« thl ItOW OUT,, 235. OO 
MIRAGE B3016 FM/SSB 30W JN ItOW OUT. .201.00 
VJ PROD. 90L-PA FM/SSB lOW IN 90W OUT.. 3 26. 93 
V^ PROD- 160L-PA FM/SSB 20M IN 160W 0UT279.93 

TOKYO HISH-POWER HL30y 2 IN 30 OUT 39.93 

TOKYO HIOH-POWER HLB2V 10 IN SO OUT 139.93 

TOKYO HIQH-POWER HL160V lO IN 160 OUT,. 309. 93 
TOKYO HISH-POWER HL160V25 25 IN 160 OUT279,91S 

hr/10M/6H RADIOS 

NCe 1O/16OM.3S0/CW,4 f^M-3 WAY SCAN- - . . BS@. 00' 

TENTEC ARSOfiY tOOW, SSB/CH, lO^SOH. , , 3J0-OO 

TENTEC CORSAIR 200W,SSB/CW- 10-1£»OM 999-O0 

TENTEC ar*iI-A 200W,SSB/CN,10-J60M,, , . . r799,^3 
AZDEN PCB'4S00 lOfl.FM M0P.,10W, 16 MEM,, 269, 93 
AZDEN PCS-4500 6M,FM MOB. , iOW, 16 tlEM. ..279.95 



Amateur 



CALL FRANK WD5QZU, JOE KA5R0Q 
OR STEVEN KA5SWI FOR QUOTES 
ON OTHER RELATED PRODUCTS 
FOB ORIGIN. 



Communications 



COD AvaUable 

Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday thm Friday 
9:00 a-m. to 2:00 p,m. Saturday - CST 
Prices sybj&ct to change without notice. 






Amateyr 
Equipment, 
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& Antennas. 
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(Toll free number 800^531*5405) 




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opiior*^ ^vsiiaiile now. retrofit kits for r^mahnmg WARC 
bands camirvg soon. Height: 2^ fi7'7.S meters; guv^rig 
not fequir&d in most mataHatJonsi. 



McxJel 2(V1CV "Tron'ibo'nie'"^ — omnidirBctlonsI coSlinear 
g-ain yartscaF for 2 meters havnng the same gain as 
doubJe-'^^ A" types, but the patented "trombone" 
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by i-n&uiatorsfor nf>aximijm strength in high winds No 
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All BUTTERNUT ANTENNAS use stainless steel 
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write for our FREE CATALOG' 



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ELECTRO IM I CS 

405 E. Market St. Lockhart, TX 78644 



^See Ustoi Advertisers on page 11 4 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 89 




H/(M HELP 



Wb mm fiappY i<f pr0¥id6 H«itj Help Waf- 
ing^ fre^. Oft 9 sf^PV-avafiAbio &9Si$ W« 
arv nat tjappy mfi^n w« /t«i« lo lake ilfn€ 
from atfmf dtJtms fQ decfptmf cryptic 
npte^ scrawled iUmqihif en dog-eerwi 
postcards ami odd-^tj^^d Beraps ot pMp0f^ 
PfeasB type Qt pnm your tw^mmi fm^ftffi 
douMe ipaeed, oo Mn8'j^"xir' stmet of 
paper snd use uppet i/rd iowercase fet- 
ters wttere appr^tiate Ml so, piaaae make 
a •*!" too* Hka • "f," nor tn "V wMcft 
ecutd tm an "ei*' or an '•>*," end 40 on. 
Hard as it mef t>e to believe, i/i/eara not te- 
mitier with evmy piece ot equtpment man- 
(itactured ort Eaiitt foe ihe iaat SO y9«rsf 
Tbanka for your cooperation, 

I UTt looking for an R&1 1 \ in any condl- 
rian. Any loads w^ii be appredaied 

J«mM A. Flats 
rsoeHof»Vi)»«yCt 
MD 21710 



I am (tixAkng for ihe service and tn^tnjc- 
tkm manual for lt» Lafayftite PF200A. I wrtll 
l»ay copyirvg and posioflt ooilft. 

OonmUi P. QuHwi 

4ad USAAD A TMfTt 

APONV 00060 

I have a large collocllon of your maga- 
2lnes (datirvQ back approximately 14 years) 
which \ am no longer abla to keep m my 
horr>e. 

II you know o1 any achooi, organiEation, 
or per^n who might tw Intftreated In having 
these, please lei me know. Many ot them 
are In bindery ar^d I hate to throw out such a 
valuabie collection. 

Bc^ Cambraiang WAZUSW 

e Whllman Drtve 

CanvHia NJ 07fi34 

Can anyone f'^^ijply Information abOOt a 
type CHC4ii40 radio receiver made by 
HammarJund? I have a achematic but no 
€Karl of values of components, Did this 
ever have a BC number or other nomenc la- 
lure? 

Harry Church WfKXP/g 

POBOKlSB 

Lebanon 1162254^126 

I have beert teaching at Gdd'ft Bible 
School now for eight years. Our school was 
started in 1900 to train future pastors and 
mfMtor^affe*, 



Thia year we started an amateur class Ih 
our ctillege department fof those who wlsli 
to wortc towante their ik^enses. We started 
out with twenty-fouf , but not alt stycK it out 
We ncsw have ntr>e wtlh ll>ejr Novice \^ 
canaeft. All are working toward tt>eir Genef- 
ats, hopeifylty bdone ttw end o1 this school 
year. Other? are working to firilsti up ttmif 
Hwiix testing and al^o fa furttwf advance- 



Wwt we afe asking Ss, iww canirt get 
equipiT>efit to fwlp train our students? Vie 
don't have ftjnds ta wofk wifh since it^& is a 
laim tnstJtutkvL We have heaid that your 
Ham Help coiunm has been very helpful to 
Others, with ideas and souitss for them to 
be atia to obtain wu^^Mts and equipmenL 
We vwouid flfeariy appreciate any &uggBa' 
tions you rrkay hiave. We are ati^e to grve 
facet pts for tax deduction purposes and 
vwoiild be glad to do so. 

If you Are Interested in knpwirtg more 
about our amatKjr-ctass program, m« 
would gladly furnish pictures or otti» infor- 
mattOTL We vMXi^d even tie happy to have 
you come see it for yoursetf. 

Thank you for your time. ar*J may the 
Lord t>iess you, 

Ftoyd E- Hyatt, Jr. 

tted of Industrial Ar» 

God^s Bible School 

1810 Young Slreei 

Cindnnatt OH 4S210 

Wanted: F45SN20 Collins mechanical fit- 
tefi 2 kHz, for an R390A receiver. Also need 
a manual for the 8D639 receiver. 

Pat Kelley WA3NYK 

aaai Snavely Ho»6 

Mlddletown PA 17057 

I need the multiphase plug-In output 
couplers (10 and 15m) for the Central Elec- 
tfonlca 200V transmitter or Info on how to 
make them. Also, any info on the CE 2O0V 
would be appfectated. 

Howanf U. Mitln W3HHVDA1 AK 

HHC 440 Signal Bn. 

APO NY 00175 

I am Eooking for a transceiver that would 
operate on all the popular amateur bands. \ 
would like it to have sidetkand capability 
acKi perhaps digital readout. I would Elke to 
uee this as a hasG station. Ooutd you tall me 
where I might find a good up^to-dale sche- 
matic and parts Hat? 



I also would be interested In a good re- 
celvlng-ayatem thematic and parts list If 
such transceiver Info is rrat availadie. I've 
looked ail over end the be^t I could come up 
with iaa iS-year-old receiver diagram. 

Mike HIgglna 

1165 Blrdiwood Uanof 

Aurora MO £5605 

I rnn an Advanced-ciaes ham with a II- 
cenae that la only about 3 years old. I got iiv 
to hamming because of my Interest as a po^ 
lent IB) merit imfrfRObiie when we retire 
al:ioard out boat. 

Working the 14.313 net and other voice 
net* comlnces me that It might be worth- 
while to get into CW and RTTY for more raiK 
»b^ if slower, conwf>uiucations under ad- 
yerse cofxUHons l see all klfide of ads for 
communications Interfacea, code readefs, 
ete^ and, tranhly, I am owerwtwfmed by the 
vi;riety of choicer. What i should like to see 
la a good m^ivey anide wttlch (teals with 
the variOMS possibility^ that a^e availatHe« 
making clear the range Irom tfie least ex- 
pensive to Vm most luKutious. and what the 
extra tjudcs will buy one in terrr^ of perfor- 
mance m modes of opefatioa 

I am «leo interested in the possibility thai 
with em ir^te<face berween the receiver and 
a compyter one couh] racedve, store, and 
display facsimile iransmissioi^s such as 
tho^ &ant by NOAA. I realize Ihat there is 
Specialized equipment avail at>ie for the our^ 
poae, but H it pretty eitpenseve. and if one 
could make a computer fterve two purposes 
with the aid ot suitat>ie software, that migtii 
be a popular route for people in my situa- 
tion. 

RrwIIyi does anyone know how many of 
ui are aready using the various mtodes of 
computer-aided communication? Some 
kind of statistics are needed to help a new- 
comer like myself avoid, on the one hand, 
go^ng overboard with expenditures for 
equipment that will do everything (If there's 
hardly anyone using the fancier stuff) or, on 
the other hand, getting the minimum and 
finding that it won't talk with most of the 
crowd we want to talk to. 

I enjoy 73 — hope someone can help me. 

John H. Hughes N1 BOS 

2a West Drive 

Marlon MA 03736 

I have a Heath kit Twoer Modei HW-30 
Z^metar AM rig. 

I have written to Heath corKiernlng 
changing this rig over lo FM or PM- They 
suggested ihsl i write to you. Please helpt 
I'm a disabled Korean vet and love to DX, 
Tharxk you tor your time and concern. 

Ivan & &at«s 

U3MC fftflt] 

117E Centamiiifti 

Boofivllle IN 4760f 




THE fHpO TOUCH TONE 




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PP-1 S55/PP-1K, S.P.SX Adj. Reiay S62. P-3, 12 or 16 Keyjor custom 
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Emphasis is on Qualtty ^ ReiiabiHty 



(2l31052't515 



I have recently acquired Sinclair's ZX 
Spectrum microcomputer, i urgently need 
CW- receiving softwara for It. I also need 
any otfwr ham software for \L 

Ashmar Firman VU^FAX 

178- A* Moaizampuri 

Hyderabad 500001 

India 

I am looking for a Ten-Tec Powef-MHe 
PM 2J 80- and 40-meier CW transceiver In 
good wod<ing condltiCMi with an AC-3 c«v 
werter for IS m^ers. Also, dO«i «fiyorw 
have any Information on how to fn^ke a 
EDemory SKpansion toard tor the VIC-20 
Chat v^ll gtve rnore than ISK? Preferably, t 
would like to eatpand to &4K or more. 

Fred X Efkkson 

ai Ball Street 

OrsriOiUAQiaSt 

Wanted: leaser ctiafc Seais catalog 

POBoxSn 
Vallfly Wills TX 76S8§ 

I have a WWn Panada pter with a 50(K 
kHz input from the receiver rt. It was used 
with a Co**ins Sli durifig ttve war. 1 w«ni to 
use it with my loom 720A receiver with an 
i4 output of 39.7315 MH£. Has any owner 
of a 720A built a mixer Of this soft? ts there 
a manufactured recenre oonverlef madft 
thai I couEd buy or p»erhaps an Icom 720 A 
group ttiat could help me? I will buy a ynit 
or gtadly attempt to build such a convert- 
er. I need the expertise ot some Inend^y 
ham. I will gladly pay the cost of $uch a 
unit} 

JamssF. Hartley W1D1S 

US Roirla #302, eoK 11 

RaymorKl ME 04071 

I need service manuals for a Boonton 
model 24{M sweep signal generator and a 
Fluke modeJ 800 differential voltmeter. I will 
gladly pay copying and mailing costs. 
Please write first. 

Qordon Pulp W«FBH 

474D Scotch Ptne Lane 

Pla<:efvllle€A9S&&7 

1 have one of the original TRS-ao Model is 
and would like a schematic for a printer In- 
terface. 

Joyce AmdorWBIZQC 

Mntena lA 50eS3 
(7123-77^3435 

I hope that you can possihiy help me via 
the ''Ham He^p/lnfo Requested" column ot 
your magazine. 

I am in possession of a &chanr^l HF- 
SS6 marine transcejvef made by Maritek, 
model no. SB6^. approximate date Of 
manufaclure, 1973. 

1 have been at>le to trace the corrn^any 
tlKOugti the US emt^assy here m London 
(Maritefe, 1819 Souih Gentrai, Kent WA 
d&^l], but lettefs have been returned "Not 
Known^ and a phone numtseJ' given was 
found to be disconnected. 

I have at preeent no tnformatlort at a! I on 
the Maritek SB&eO and would tllte very 
much to have la) a copy of the wof1<ahop 
service hindbook and^ circuit tteiai^s, (t^ 
a copy of die opef^tions handbook, and 
afiy other info (especially thai on the a«t- 
taigs of the laps of the output stage). 

I can arrange to have these photocopied 
In the US. Canada, or here in the UK, and 
tf>e origbial tetumed. i am willing to relnv 
burse arty experises IrKurrad. 

Ma Partildge GSAUU 

fi Slagdon Walk 

Teddirbgtofi 

London TW119LH 



m 73 Magazine • May, 1904 



SOCIAL EVENTS 



Ustlfigs in this cofumn sre provided frse of 
charge on a spaQe-Bveilab!e b&sis. The toA 
lowing (fi formation stiouid be irtcfaded in 
every announcement: spon^Qf, event, tfafe. 
time, piace, city, st3te, admission charge (if 
any}, features, taiH-im ffeQuencies, and tf^e 
name of wham to contact for further informa- 
tion. Announcements must be received by 73 
Magazine by the first of the month, two 
months prior to the- month in which the event 
takes piaoe. M&ft toEdiiaris} Officeat 73 Mag- 
aszlne*. Pine St„ Peterborough NH 03458. 

CHICAGO IL 
MAY 2 

The Chicago Amateyr Radio CEub's Eve- 
nmg Mjni-Hamf&st will be held on Wednes- 
day, May 2, 1964, from 6D0 pm to 10^00 pm, 
at the Edgebnook Golf Course Field House, 
6100 IM. Central (tietween EJston and 
Devon)^ Chicago IL Admission is $1.00 and 
card-tabje spaces are S3.00, Refreshments 
wiii be avaHabie. Talk-in on 14652 MHz. For 
tfcketSn space reservations, or more infor- 
mation, send an SASE to CARC. 5631 W. Ir- 
ving Park Road, Chicago IL 60634, or phone 
(312}-545^622. 

ST, DAVED AZ 
MAY 4-& 

The Cochise Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion, tnc, will hold a hamfest (upgraded 
from a swapmeet) on May 4-6, ^BM, jn St. 
Pavfd AZ. There will be a flea market and 
ali taiEgaters are w&lcome. Tours planned 
to Tombstone, the Btsbee Lavender Piti 
and other places of interest. Tafk-in on 
.16/76 and .52 simplex. For more details, 
contact CAR A, Attention: Bob Cfay KB7HB, 
PO Box 1656^ Siera Vista AZ 65636, 

NASHUA NH 
MAY 4*6 

The 10th annual Eastern VHFflJHF Con- 
ference wJil be hetd on May 4-6, 1964, at 
the Sheraton Tara^ Exit 1^ OS 3^ Nastiua 
NH. Registration is $14. 50 in advance and 
120,00 at the door. Reservations for the 
Saturday-nEght banquet are $15.00 each, 
payable in advance. For advanco registra- 
tions and banquet reservations^ send a 
check to Rick Commo K1L0G, 3 Pryor 
Road, Natick MA 01760, before April 29th. 
Features wiJj include a Friday-night hospi- 
tality room, tech ni cat talks by well-known 
VHFers, rap sessions for the various VHF/ 
UHF bands, noise-figure and antenna 
meadurements, and other activities. 
Room reservations should tie made direct- 
ly with the hoteE (mention the Eastern 
VHF,^UHF Conference) or other motels In 
the area. For further informal ion » wrfte 
Lewis D. Collins W1GXT, 10 Marshall Tef- 
race, Way land MA 01778, or phone (d17)- 
358-2664 before 10:00 pmi. 

LUFKIN TX 
MAY 4-6 

The Region Four United States Ah 
force MARS will hold its annual confer- 
ence on May 4-6, 1384, at the Rhodeway 
Inn, Lufkin TX. On Friday night there will 
be an administrative meeting for the head- 
quarters personnel, state MARS directors, 
and all of the Region Four officials. For 
those not attending the meeting, the hos- 
pitality room will Jae open^ On Saturday, 
there wHl be a series of pres0ntations 
throughout the day, and that evening a 
banquet will be held for all delegates and 
their wive^, followed by the annual 



awards. For further details, contact Ed 
Langston N5CIP, Conference Chairman, 
1 123 Sayers Street, Lufkin TX 75901. 

SACRAMENTO CA 
MAYS 

The North HiJJs Radio Club, Inc., will 
sponsor the 12th annual Sacramento Val- 
ley Amateur Radio Hamswap on Satur- 
day, May 5^ 1&S4, from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm, 
at the Placer County FairgroundSr Rose- 
ville CA^ Admission is free. Tables and 
tailgate reservations are 56.00 in advance 
and Sfi.OO on the day of the event, Talk^n 
on 144.59/145.19 MHz. For more informa- 
tion, contact 0. Long, 8810 Swallow Way, 
Fair Oaks CA 9562S. 

GEDARSUaGWI 
MAY 5 

The Ozaukee Radio Club will sponsor 
its 6th annual swapfest on Saturday, May 
6, 1384, f rom 8:00 am to 1:00 pm^ at the Cir- 
cle B Recreation Center, Highway 60, Ce- 
darburg Wl (located 20 miles north of Mil- 
waukee). Admission Is $2.00 in advance 
and $3.00 at the door. SEx-foot tatDfes are 
$2.00 and eight-foot tables are $3,00. Food 
and refreshments will be available. Sell- 
ers will be admitted at 7:00 am for table 
setups. For tickets, tables, maps, or more 
information, send a busEness-si;^e SASE 
to 1964 Ozaukee Radio Club Swapfest, PO 
Box 13, Port Washington Wl 53074. 

OWEGO NY 
MAY& 

The 25th annual Southern Tier Amateur 
Radio Clubs Hamfest will be held on Sat- 
urday, May 5, 1984, at the Tread way Inn, 
Owego NY (take NY Route 17 to exit 65). 
The f fea mari<et will open at 8:00 am; other 
actJvKi^es will rndude vendor displays and 
sales, tech and non-tech talks, and re- 
freshments, Tickets for the dinner at 6:30 
pm wEEl be available by advance reserva- 
tion only. Taik-in on .22J.a2, ABfJB, and 
146.52 simpiex. For further information, 
please send an SASE to Craig P. England 
KF2X, RD#1, Box 144, Vestal NY 13650. 

MEADVILLE PA 
MAYS 

The tenth annuai Northwestern Penn- 
sytvania Hamfest will be held on May S, 
1984, beginning at 8:00 am, at the Craw- 



ford County Fairgrounds, Meadville PA. 
Admission Is $3.00 and children under 12 
will be admitted free. A lOfool inside dis- 
play table is $5,00 and an outside car 
space is $2.00. Refreshments wrEI be avail- 
able and commercial displays are wel- 
come. Talk-In on 145 -13, 147.21, 147.03. 
For more details, write CARS, Attention: 
Hamfest Committee, PO Box 653, Mead- 
ville PA 16335. 

GREENVILLE SO 
MAY £-6 

The Blue Ridge Amateur Radio Society 
will sponsor the Greenville SC Hamfest on 
Saturday and Sunday, May 5-6, 1984, at 
the American Legion Fairgrounds, White 
Horse Road, ^/i mile north of I-B5, Green- 
ville SC, Admission is $3.00 in advance 
and S4.00 at the door. Food, plenty of near- 
by parking, and overnight camping with a 
limited number of hookups will be avail- 
able. There will be drive-in unloading and 
ioading before and after the hamfest. TTie 
area will be availablefor setups on Friday 
evening and security will be provided both 
Friday and Saturday nights. Talk-in on 
146.01/.61. For advance tickets, write Mrs- 
Sue Chtsm N4ENX, Rte. 6, 203 Lanewood 
Drive, GreenvllEe SC 29607. For further in- 
formation, write Phil Mull ins WD4KTG, 
Hamfest Chairman, PO Box 99, SEmpson- 
ville SC 29681. 

COLUMBIA MO 
MAY 5-6 

The Central fwllssourl Radio Assocfatlon 
will hold Columbia Hamfest '84 on May 5-6, 
1984, at the Hilton tnn, 1-70 and Stadium 
Boulevard, Columbia MO. Features will in- 
clude forums, a hospitality room, a Satur- 
day-night banquet, a hard-suf faced flea 
market, display tables, and shuttle^us ser- 
vice to parking areas and shopping centers. 
Talk-in on .16;.76 or 220,42^.02. For banquet 
tickets, reservations for hotels, I lea-market 
spaces or dealer tables, and more informa- 
tfon, contact Ben Smith KlBPCK, Route 1^ 
Prairie Home MO 65068, or phone (ai6>Jt27- 
5319. 

KANKAKEE IL 
MAY6 

The annual Kankakee Hamfest will be 
heid on May 6, 1984, beginning at 8:00 am, 
at the Kankakee County Fairgrounds. 
Tickets are $2.50 in advance and $3.00 at 
the gate. Features will include an FCC 
booth, a large flea market with both En- 
door and outdoor facifittes, shuttle ser- 
vice from adjacent Greater Kankakee Air- 
port, and refreshments. Talk-in on 
146,34/,34. For motel reservations, call 
(S15)"939-4551. For further information. 



phone Don Kerouac K9NR before 5:00 pm 
at (815^-937-2750, or wrtte KARS Hamfest, 
1377 Circle Drive NW, Kankakee IL 60901. 

LONG ISLAND 
MAYS 

The Suffolk County Radio Club Indoor 
and Outd:oor Flea Market will be held on 
Sunday, May 6, 1984, from 8:00 am to 3:00 
pm, at Republic Lq>dge No. 1987, 585 Broad- 
hollow Road (Route 110). Mefviiie NY. Gen- 
eral admission is $2.00; children under 12 
and wives will i^e admitted free. Indoor seil- 
ers' tables are S7.00 and outdoor space Is 
$5,00 (includes one admission), T?iere wHI 
be refreshments on the premises and plen- 
ty of free parking. Taik-in on 144.61/145.21 
and 146.52. For additional information, con- 
tact Richard Tygar AC2P at (516)^4:3^5956 
(evenings). 

SULLIVAN IL 
MAYG 

The Moultrie Amateur Radio Kiub will 
hold its annual SuElivan IL MARK Hamfest 
on May 6, 1984, at the 4-H Fairgrounds, 3 
miles east and 1 mile north of Sullivan on 
the Cad well Road. Features include cov- 
ered facilities, lunch, and a free swapper's 
row. TaEk-in on 146.655/.055 and 146.520. 
For more information, contact William 
Guennewig WA9W0B at (ai7)-26e-3l39 
(evenings).. 

SANDWICH IL 
MAY 6 

The Kishwaukee Radio Club of DeKalb 
IL will hold Its annual hamfest on Sunday^ 
May 6, 1984, at the Sandwich Fairgrounds, 
Sandwich. Tickets are $2,50 In advance 
and £3.00 at the door; tables are $5.00 
each. Overnight camping without hook- 
ups will be ava Enable, For more Enforma- 
tion, contact Howard Newqulst WA9TXW, 
PO Box 349, Sycamore IL 60178. 

PARAMUS NJ 
MAY 6 

The Bergen ARA wilt hold a Ham Swap 
"n' Sell on May 6, 1984, from 8:00 am to 
4:00 pm, at Bergen Community College, 
400 Paramus Road, Paramus NJ. There 
will be tailgating only and admission for 
seiiers is $4.00 (bring your own table). 
Buyers will t>e admitted free. Talk-in on 
.79/19 and .52. For more Information, con- 
tact Jim Greer KK2U, 444 Berkshire Road, 
Ridge wood NJ 07450, or phone (20l)-445- 
2856. 

CENTRALJA IL 
MAYG 

The Cent rail a Wireless Association^ 
Inc., will hold its annual hamfest on Sun- 



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73 Magazine • May, 1984 91 



day, May 6, 1984, ai the KaskaskiaCoiiego 
GymnaaJmn, 3 milto north w&9^ Qf Centra- 
II* I L Admifr£lefk lo lti« ha^nfesl 1$ free 
and ihfifs will \m no charQe foe tive flea- 
maiKel ar>d exhibit space {*. I^mtred num- 
ber of iab(es wit) be issued on a first- 
OOtrm, first-serve hasas). Doors will opsi at 
7^ am for fl&a^marfcft arvd exhibit set- 
ups. Food arvd refresr^fnefits wtti be avaU- 
nMe, as well as plenty of free parlt^ng, 
TalMn on l47^7/.a7 and 146.52, For fur^ 
ther information r contact 8ud King 
WB90EQ al (618)^&32-6eOSor Lou Hodges 
W9IL at (61B)-533^724, Or write to CWA, 
Inc., PO Box n&G, Cant rail a IL 62601. 

DEERFIELD NH 
MAY 12 

The Hosstrackirs witf hold their Sprln§ 
Tailgate Hamfest on Saturday, May 12, 
1984, sunr1$e to sonse(, at the Deecfield 
NH FaJi^rouruis. Admission ia $2.00, in- 
cludirig tailgaters and commercial deal- 
era. For a nocni^nai fee, iKere will be Ffiday- 
fiJglit camprnrQ for Self-contained rigs. No 
one will be admitted t>efore 4:00 pm Friday 
and no spaces wrl4 be resefvfld. Profits will 
benefit ihe Boston Burn UnH of theStirin- 
flfa' HospitaK Last year's total donation 
was over $4,700^ Fof turttrer ^nlormatio^i or 
a rriap, s«nd an SASE to Norm WA1IVB, 
RFD Box 57, West Baldwin ME 04091; Joe 
K1RQG, Star Route Box 56, Bucksport ME 



ADVERTISE YOUR 

SPECIAL EVENT 

IN 73 



044t6: or Bob W1GWU, Walton ^kMi, Sea- 
brook NH 03874. 

fKK^ERSAft 
liAYt2 

The NortlTwest Arfiansas ARC. Inc. will 
ho4d Its 4tti annual ?iamfe$l/iswapfedt on 
Saturday, May 1 Z, 1984, ftom 6:00 am to 4t(X) 
fwn. in the Rogers Youtri Center Building, 
315 West CHI we, Rogers AR Geri^ai admis- 
sion Is free. The fee for commercial ex- 
hibitors arKi frea-mailiet (ablss/space ts 
S2.00 on a first-come, first serve basis, 
Doofs will open at 6:C30 am for setups only. 
Program acllvilles hiave been scheduled 
and there wMI be a snack bar and parking on 
the premises. Restaurants are nearby. TalK- 
In on ,16^.76 and ^2 simplex. For more inTor- 
malion. write Ray Mnitren AFSW. 2014 
South 16lti Street, Rogers AR 72750, 

YAKIMA WA 
MAY 12-13 

Tha Yakima Amateyr R^lo Qub 
fW7AQ) Will hof^j the Central Washington 
Slate Kamrest on May 12-13, 1984, at the 
Hobby Building at the Central Wastiino* 
ton State Fairgrounds, Yakima WA. On 
Saturday < the tiours will be 9:00 am to 5:00 
pm with lufKh available, and on Sunday^ 
8:00 cm to 2:00 pm with breakfast and 
lunch avellabb. Registration is $4.00 In 
advance and $5.00 at the door. Activities 
wlii Include regional dealers' displays and 
a free swap and shop wlih plenty of ta- 
bles. Talk-ln on 146,01^61 and t4e,34/.94. 
For pra-raglstration, contact Bob Ruther- 
ford WB7WAM, PO Box S211, Yakima WA 
98909, 

MEDINA OH 
MAY 13 

The Medina Two Meter Group will spon- 



sor the Medina County Hamfest on May 
13t 1984, from B:OQ am to 4:00 pm, inside 
Um lytedina County Com^muntty Center 
Building, Lafayette Road, State Rle. 42 
SW. Tickets are $2.50 In advance and 
S3.00 at ttte dooc. Tables are S5<00 and 
some etecirical hookuf:^ are available. 
Vefidor setup will be at 7:00 am and re- 
tresTimenls and fre^ parking will be avail- 
able, Talk4n on U7.S2i.Q3 (KflTvmj, For 
table reservations and advance tickets, 
write PO BOK 452, Medina OH 44256. or 
telephone (218K25^21 or l2 16^723^50 10. 



iEDFORD PA 

MAY 13 

The Bedford PA, the Alloona PA, tha 
Somerset PA^ the Gumtkerland MD Ama- 
teur Radip Clubs, and ttio Blue Knob 
Repeater Association will $poniior the 
second annual Southern Aiiegnenieo 
Hamte»t on May 13, 1984, from 8.^)0 am to 
5:00 pm. at trie Bedford County FAlr 
groyruts, located Dn« mile west of Bedr 
ford on Ftouie 30 and orte half mile west o4 
Itie Route 220 bypass, dose to the Bad^ 
ford exH Of trie pa Tumptke. Admission Is 
$3,00; inside spaccis are (5.00 each and 
outside tailgate spaces areS2.00. Besi{:tes 
other hamfest activities, arrangernanta 
are being made for reduced rates to visit 
restored Old Bedford Village. Talk-In on 
145.49 (Bedford repeater) and 146.52 sim* 
pi ex. For more information^ call Tom Qut' 
shati W3BZN at (614)942-7334, 



STIRUNG NJ 
MAY 13 

Th« TCBA Flea Market will be h«ld ln« 
doors on Sunday, May 13. 1984, from 9:00 



am until 4:00 pm, rain or shine, at the Pa»* 
saic Township Community Center, oft Val* 
ley Road (opposite Jaeger Lumber and 
Building Matsiial GenterV Stirling NJ. 
Begistraiion is $2.50 and tables are S6j00. 
RefrestTments witi be available. Tallinn on 
t47.855f-^5 MHz and 146^ simplex 
(VV^LIfRju For table r^Hrvatlons or motm 
Infocmatlon, write Dick Frank iin W2EUF, 
PO Box 1S2, Wastfieid NJ 07090. or calt 
(201^232-5965 or C201F270^1^. 



WAQONEI^ OK 
MAY 16-20 

The Broken Arrow Amateur Radio Club 
and the Tulsa Amateur Radio Club will 
sponsor the Greencountry Hamfeat on May 
18-20, 1984, at the Western Hills Lodge In 
Sequoyah State Park, tocated 6 miles east 
of Wagonef, Registration is %2J5C in ad- 
vance or $3 00 at ihe door. There will be pro- 
grams for the entire famjty. For more infor* 
mation, writ? Broken Annow Amateir RadHo 
Ctub. Inc. PO Bo5i 562, Broken Airow OK 
7401Z 

FAESfrO CA 
MAY ia-20 

The Frear>o Amateur Radio Cfub wllS 
hold the 42nd annual Fresno Hamfest on 
May 16-20, 1984, at the Tropicana Inn, 
Fresno CA. The hours on Friday are 7:00 
pm to 10:00 pm and on Saturday and Sun- 
day, all day and evening. Before May 11th, 
full registration is S23,00 and banquet- 
only tickets are $1 4,00. After that date, full 
registration Is 125,00 and tianquei-only 
tickets are $15,00. Partial registration is 
S5 00 and tJcheis tor itra ladies' lurvcneon 
and program are $6.50. Other act ivi lies 
will include golf, technical sessions, a 
transmillef hunt, an ARRL torum, a QGWA 





m *wL^ 




ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur satellite Corporatioa 

For a SAMPLE COPY please 

send S2 to: 



(AMSAT), P.O. Box 27, Washington, DC 

20047. 




Selling 73 will 
make money for 
you. Consider the facts: 
Fact 1: Selling 73 increases 
store traffic— our dealers tell 
us that 73 is one of tfie hottest- 
selling amateur radio magazines on the 
newsstands. 
Fact 2: There is a direct correlation between 
store traffic and sales— increase the number of 
people coming through your door and you1i increase 
sales. 

Fact 3; Fact 1 + Fact 2 = INCREASED $ALE$, which 
means more money for you. And that's a fact. 
For information on selling 73, call 800-343^728 (in New 
Hampshire call 1 -924-947 1) and speak with Ginnie 
Boudrieau, our bulk sales manager. Or write to her at 
73, 80 Pine St., Peterborough, NH 03458. 



7S, 



Annateur Rado's 
TechnicalJoumal 



80 Pine Sirtet Peterborough, NH 034&S 

800-343-0728 



82 73 Magazine ■ May, 1984 



m«erKng, and a swap meet. Talk-In on 
t4e.34/.94. For reaervatlona artd more Jrv 
format Ion, write Freano Amateur Radio 
Qub, Inc. PO Bq% 783. Fresno CA 93712. 
Of phOAe i20@)'26a^14 Of {2C»)-22&4699. 

DURHAM ^iC 

MAT 19 

Th9 Duilittn FM Association wf II T>o4d the 
DuFtiam Hftmfest of! May 19, 1984, at the 
South Square Mall in Durtiam N€. There 
will be «itiopplng and movies iof the lacS^es, 
T8l}(4n on 147.22^^25. 

BIRMtNGHAM AL 
MAY 10-3fl 

The Qlrni Ingham Amateur Radio Qub 
will tK>1d its annual Birmlnghamf^t on 
May 1d-20, 1dS4, beginning at 9:00 am 
each day. In ttie air-condttloned Birming- 
hgm/Jeffafson Civic Center. Admission Is 
$4.00 per person, valid for both days, and 
children under l£ will be admitted free. 
Fiee-markat reservallona are not required 
and table rental is $6.00 per table per day. 
Setup ttme will ba available Friday night 
and at 7:00 am on Saturday and Sunday. 
Features include an ARRL State Convert 
tion. Wouff Hong, a CW contest, a home- 
brew contest, meetings, forums, rton^^am 
act i villas, a banquet, a flea marlcec, and 
exhibitions. Talk-m on 146.34/.94 
(W4CUE/R|i For more Information, write to 
Oimiinghamiesl. PO Box 603. Blrm- 
Ingttam A1_ 35201. or phone Keith Land- 
mm KD4DO at (205^623^1628 after 6:00 pm 
Cential, 

BOilLOER CO 
MAY SO 

Th^ Rocky Mounlfln VHF Society* Inc., 
wfH tictld the annual $prlr^ hamfesi i^ 



Sunday May 20. 19S4, from 9:00 am to 3:00 
pm, rain or ahlne, at t^e Boulder National 
Guard Armory ^ 4750 Nofth Broadway, 
Boulder CO. Admission Is a 13.QQ dona- 
lion pef tamjly. There is no seller's char^ 
t>ut sellets should bffng ttveir own tables 
Son^e tables wIM £>e provided, byt If more 
than one Ubie i$ neet^ed, seilefs should 
contact the organ Fzers In advaf^c^. Fea^ 
tures will ir>ciude a big hajn swap, techni- 
cal domofutratlona, arvd ^raninars. Food 
and drink will be aval(at>le. Talk4n on 
146,l6i'.76 and 146^. For more informa' 
tlon, vi^ite Richard Ferguson KAiDXMi 
1150 Albion Road, Boulder CO BOX^ or 
fVhone (303H^£B71. 

PITTSBURG KS 
MAY 20 

The Pittsbuig Repealer Organization 
will hold its annual hamfest on May 20* 
19&4, from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, at Lincoln 
Center, Lincoln Park, Pittsburg KS. Ad< 
mission is S2.00 for each amateur and in- 
cludes his family^ Activities will Include a 
flea market and a covefed^llsh dinner. 
(Piease bring a covered dish; chicken will 
be provided.) For more Information, write 
to Pittsburg Repeater Ofga nidation, c/o 
Steve Cooper, 1405 N. Elm, Plttsbufg KS 
66762. 



UNION Hi 
MAY 20 

The Irvtngton Radio Amat&ur Club will 
hotd Its 12th annual hamfest on May 20^ 
1884, from 9iX) am to 3:00 pm, in new and 
vxpanded quarters at the Boys B. Girts 
Club, 1060 Jeanelte Avenue, Union NJ. 
Tickets ere liOO in advance and $2.00 at 
the door; tables are tS.OO each. There will 
tie plenty of on-site parking. Talk^in ofi 



.34/ J4 and 52 direct, Fof table feserva- 
tlons. advance tickets, or mofe informa- 
tion, phone Walt W20R evenings at 
(201^763-2230, or write Ed Surmailus 
WA2MYZ 2t33 Stanley Terrace, Uniofi NJ 

a7oea. 

OAK HAIWXt OH 
liAY20 

Tlie Sandusky^Miawa County Corrit>ined 
Hamfest wlJi be held on May 20. 19B<4, at ttie 
Ottawa County Fairgrounds. State Route 
1^ 3 miles east of Oak Harbor OH. Tickets 
9m S250 In achance and $3^00 at the gate. 
Food, tabl^, arid free parking wlJI tie avail- 
aWa, Talk'in on 147^7^.075 and 32 mm- 
pfesL For more rnformalfon. write John Die- 
k«y, 545 N, Jackson Street. Fremont OH 
43420. 

ATHENS OH 

MAY 20 

The 5th annual Athens County Amateur 
Radio Association hamfest will be held on 
Sunday, May 20, 1984, rain or shine, from 
8:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the Athens City Rec^ 
reatSon Center, 733 East State Street, 
Athens OH {US 50 east). Admission Is $300 
at thi gate- There will t^ acres of paved 
area for outdocr tables and tail{jate dis- 
plays at $2.00 per space. Indoor tables are 
$3.00 and are available by calling Joe NESR, 
Club presidient, at (614)^^7^74 for rraenia- 
Il0fk&. There will tje p*enty of parking and re- 
fresiiments will be served. Tatk4fi or» MtM 
and JS2. For further infom^tion, send an 
SASE to ACARA, PO Bca 72. Athens OH 
*5701. 

WRIGHTSTOWN PA 
MAY^ 

The Warminster Amateur Radio Club, 



inc., will hold its 10th annual hamtest on 
Sunday, May 20, 1984, caln or ahlne. begin- 
ning at 7:00 am, at the MIddlelown Grange 
Fairgrounds, Penns Parle Road, Wright s- 
lown PA. PonatlOfis are $2.00 each in ad- 
vance and $3.00 each at the doon XYt3 
and children will admitted free Taligatera 
will be charged an additiOfial $2.00 for a 
tO-toot outdoor s^pace; sorr» 8-fooi indoor 
spacer without power will be available. 
Food and drink will t>e serv«d. Talk-In on 
147.69^.09 MI42 and 146^ MH2. Fof more 
information arvl pre^registralkm, contact 
Bill C^slck W3GJC, Apl 706, Qam«r 
House, Hatboro PA 19040. Of phom (21§h 
441^6048. 



W ABASH M 
MAY 20 

The Wat^a&h County Arnateur Redlo 
Club, Inc., will hoid the I6th annual Wa^ 
bash Hamfest on Sunday, May 20, >9B4, 
from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, at the Wabash 
County 4-H Fairgrounds, State Route 13, 
Wabash in. Donations are 12.50 In ad- 
vance and $3,00 at the gate; advance res- 
ervatlons are requested. The flea market 
includes new and used gear In an unlimit- 
ed outdoor area, and major vendors will be 
in an Indoor area. There wilt be tree over- 
night iiarlcing at the fairgrounds. iooiJ 
motet lodgings, an<t reasonably-priced 
food ava^^abl^. Talk-in on 147.83/.03, 
t4fi>52/,52, and 146.94/.94, For advance 
tickets, wrtte Don Spanglef W9HNO, 236 
Sovtttwood Drive, Wabaah IN 4«892« Of 
piiOfta a 19^563-^64. 



FITCHBURG MA 
MAY 20 

TtW Mor^tachu&ett Amateur Radio As- 



ATTENTION 
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73 Magazine • May, 1 984 93 



sociatJon w\\\ hold an indoor flea markdt 
on Surrey, May 20. ISB*. from 9:00 am to 
3:00 pm, at me Fltctiburg Civic Center, 
1000 John fitch Highway, Fitchburg MA. 
Admission la tl.OO and labjes are SS,00 
e«cti. Dcora wWi open f&r selleins at B:00 
am. R«(t«shment$ and plenty of f rae parK- 
ing will ^ avallatXe. TsfK^ln on 145.4^35 
and 1 46.52. Fo* space resefvatiofis. *«fld 
A dwcl^ payabfe to MAHA to Jim B«aur«^ 
gard KB1AY, 7 Mountain Avenue, Fltch- 
bufQ MA 01420. 



pirmAMCT 
MAY 20 

The Easiefn Connecticut Amateur Ra- 
dio Association will hotd itB lOtti annual 
flea market ofi May 20t 1984, from 9;00 am 
10 2:00 pm, at Ifie Elks Hall. Putnam CT. 
Tables are S7.00 \n advance and 13.00 at 
the door. There will be good food and twv- 
erages. TaIMn on 147.22&/.82S and .520, 
For furthsf Information and advance rea- 
arvationip write Richard Bpahl K13YI, 
Uke Parkway, Webster MA 01570, or 
phone t6i7^'94M420, or Donald Amiraull 
K1APE, ee Ubonl^ Road, Rfl #1. Bo^ 31 Q» 
Thompson CT 06277. or phone (203J-923' 
2727. 



KINGSTON ONT CAN 
MAY 25-26 

The Atr Fofce Tel^:oFnimunicalions F4t^ 
union to honof ttie 50th a^intvefsary of Atf 
Fon::^ CotTUTiLiiii&ations will b« Md ot\ 
May 2S-26. lSfl4. ai the Canadian Forces 
School of CofTtmufiications and EiectfOfv 
Ics at Kingston. R^^rvatiofrs are SlO.00 
^refundable). This Is a reunion of a^i who 
are serving of have se^viewl in tfm Air Force 
telecom world and tt»eir spoas^. For 
more mtormation, contact the Air Fore* 
Telecofn Reunion Committee, CF6 King^ 
Slon, KInflSlon, ONT K7L 2ZZ, For reserva- 
tions » send a cti^ek or money ordef to th« 
same address. 



KNOXVILLE IN 
MAY 2S-27 

The Radio Amateur Club of Knox Coun- 
ty will hold lis leih annjal hamfeal on 
May 26-27. 19S4, at the Kerbella Temple 
Auditor lym, jusi eaai of US 441 at the Ten* 
nasftefr River behind the Vol Inn MoteL 
Thi hours on Saturday will be from 9:00 
am to 5:00 pm arKf on Sunday, from 10:00 
am to 4D0 pm. Admission is $3.00. f^m- 
turea wU\ Include radio and computer for- 
ums, deaisf^. indoor and la^Jgaie f(ea 
markets, and free parKing, TaJNn on 
147JIO/.30. For more infomiatiofi, write 
L«rrY Poar« N4EHR, 4320 Felfy Dnve. 
Knoxvllla TN 379ifi, Of phone 0^Sy 
60741 S* 



WEST FRIENDSHIP MD 
MAY 27 

The Maryland FM Association wftt hold 
Its annual hamfest on Sunday. May 27^ 
1984. from 6:00 a/n to 4:00 pm, at the 
Howard COijnty Fairgrounds in West 
Friendship MD {about 30 rr^lles west of 
BalLlmora on h70). Admission fa a S3.00 
donation, tailgatlng is S3,00, and Inside ta- 
bles are $6.00 each In advance and S 10.00 
each on the day of the hamfest, If avail- 
able. Commercial vendors must have pro- 
per laK-Hcense certificates available and 
Jiems offered for sale mu$t be amateur* 
radio related. TalHIn on 146.10^.76 and 
146,52. For table reservations or mora in- 
tormation, write MFMA Hamfeat Commit- 
tee, c/o John Bgin WASVINN^ fi2l6 Sty era 
Court, laurel MD 20707, or phon» [30 1^ 
621^2352, 



BLACKSBURG VA 
MAY 31-JUN 2 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Slate 
UnlvftfsHy wilt hoJd a new worlohop* Pm- 
sonai Computer and STD Computer Inttr* 
lacing fo< Scientific InstmmenI Automa- 
tion. on Mar 31 -June 2. 1364, at Virginia 
Tech. BlacKsburg VA Th« wortishop la 
$395.00 for tt^ three days and will be df* 
rectad by Mr, David E. Larsen. Dr. Paul E. 
Field, Dr. Jooathan A. Tttus, and Or. Chris- 
topher Tllus. Each participant will wir« 
and lest interfaces. Fof more infomiatlor^. 
write Ot; Unda Uffel, CEC, Vifgihia Tech. 
Black sburg VA 24061. or phone (703)^961' 
4548. 



GUELPK ONT CAN 

JtJN2 

The Quelph Amateur Radio Club (VE3ZM1 
Mill hold Iha 10th annual t^^nlral Ontario 
Amateur Radio Flea Market and Compuier- 
fast on Satureiay, June 2, 1984, from 6:00 am 
to 4:00 pm, al Regai Hall, 340 Woodlawn 
Road West. Guelph ONT. General admis- 
sion i& 52.00 arkd children 12 years and un- 
4m wilt be admitted free. Vandors^ admis^ 
alon is $5.00 per 8-foot space. Doors will t« 
open to vendors only from 6:00 am ar>d a 
quantity ol 3' x W tables will be available for 
rental for @ 00 each. Features will include 
commercial displays^ surptus de^era, com' 
puier aottware and hardware, ^ndof'' =*^ 
outdoor displays, and a mtn&shme^. .,.:i- 
cession. TaiMn on 147.960(147.360 
(VE3ZMG) and .S2f5£ Bimp4fflL Fof furlher 
infoTTT^ation, contact Susan Barabus 
VE3e£C or ioe Barabas ve38XN at (519^ 
824>14IH tGudnh), Ralph aarllett VEJBIX 
M (5191^36^2097 (Guelph), Hcfvy Chhsiian- 
tan VE3BYy at {5i9)-743^g022 tKltchefkeh. 
Fred Hammond VE3HC at (5l9^B22e323 
(Qu«iph), or Ihe Guelph Amareur Radio 
Club. PO BoK 1305, Guelph ONT NtH 0H9« 
Canada. 



ST. PAUL MN 
JUN2 

The North Area Repeater Afl social Ion 
will sponsor a swapfest and exposition for 
amateur-radio operators on Saturday, 
June 2. 19B4, at the f^Ainneaota State Fair- 
grounds. St. Paul, Admission la $4.00. 
There will be free overnight parking for 
aeit-contained campers on June 1st. Pea- 
tures will include eKhtbits, txx>ths. and a 
giant outdoor flea markei, talk-in on 
J5/J5 and .16^.76, For more informallon, 
write ATTkateur Fair. PO Box S57. Hopkins 
MN 55343, or call (61ZH2O'600O. 



FriTSBURCH PA 
JUN3 

The 30th annual Breeze Shootofs Hanv 
teat Witt be fiakl on Sunday. June 3. 1964, 
from 9.D0 am to 4i)0 ptn, at rh« White 
Swan Amusement Park, PA Rie. 60 ^Park- 
way Weail, near Itm Greater Pittsburgh in» 
tamaitorml Airport. Registration is $200 
or 3 for S5.D0. Sheltered tahles for v»ndOf» 
are avai Cable by advance registraUon only« 
Admission and f tea-mar Net spaces are 
free. There will be food avalFabie and ao 
tlvitiea win include the family amusement 
park. Talk-in on 28iMn and 29 MHz. For 
further information, please write Don 
MyslewakI K3CHD, 359 McMahon Roadf 
Morth Huntingdon PA 15642, or phone 
{4l2|-d630570. 



ROME NY 
JUN 3 

The Rome Radio Club. Inc., wfll present 
the 32nd edition of its Rom© Ham Faifiily 
Day on Sunday, June 3. 19B4, at fiedt's 
Grov^ Rofna NY. Adlivitj^ will inciuidv 



games, contests, educational and scien- 
tific displays and presentations, and a 
large ffea marliet. Good food and bever- 
ages will be availet^ie througtiout the day, 
whldi will t^e dImAxed by a dinner and ttie 
Hamol-thfr Year award. 

MANASSAS VA 
JUNl 

im Ole Virglrrla Hams ARC, Inc., will 
hold the tenth annual Manassas Hamfest 
on Sunday. June X 1984, beginnir^ at 6:00 
im. at Ptfnce Williani County Fair- 
grounds, VA Route 234. V» mm eoulh of 
Manassas VA. AdmissiOrt l« $4.00 per per» 
son (Children under 12 will be admitted 
free) and there will t>e no advance saiea. 
Activities will include 25 acrea of lallgat- 
ing (setups at 7:00 am), indoor commercial 
exhibits, breakfast and lunch menus, a YL 
program, and CW proficiency awards. 
TalMn on 146.37/97 WA4FPM (Manassas 
repeater^ and 146.52 simplex. For more In- 
formation, write Hamfesti c/o Die Virginia 
Hams ARC, Inc., Manassas VA 22110, or 
phone (703^361-8468. 

CHELSEA Ml 
JUN 3 

The Ctietsea Swap artd Shop wlO be 
held on Sunday* June 3, 1964, from 6:00 
am to 2,-00 pm^ at the Chelsea Fair- 
QrourMfe, Chelsea ML The donaiion is 
$230 in advarvce and $3.00 at the gate- 
Children unde^ 12 and norhham spovaes 
will be admitted frBe. Tat>l4 apmem i$ $7.00 
per 6 feflt iladies' tabfes iMilocMTW^ and 
trunk sales are S2.D0 per space: Qates will 
open lor seilera at 5:00 am. There will te 
plenty of piftclng. Inciuding spocial party- 
ing for the handicapped. Taik-in on 146.52 
simplex and the 147.656 Ciieisea repeater. 
For rnore information, wriie William Alten- 
betTKtt WB8H&N, 3132 Timbertine. Jack- 
son Ml 49201, Of phone tSl7>764^7e6, 

BOWUNG GREEN KY 
JUN 9 

The Kentucky Cotonel Amateur Radio 
Club will hold its 2nd annual hamlest on 
June 9, 1984, from B:00 am to 3:00 pm, at 
the JC Pavilion al the Southern Kentucky 
Feirg rounds. Bowling Green KY. Tickets 
are S2.0O in advance and S3.(X) at the door. 
Features will Include an inside and out- 
side flea market, inside displays of new 
equipment, food, free coffee, and free 
parking. Talk-in on 146 25/.65 and 146.62 
simplex. For further ii\formation, write Ed 
Gann N4H1D, Box 9:2, Rouie 19, Bowling 
Qrem KY 42101. or call (SOZ^-SC^SBI i 

KINGSTON PA 

JUN 3 

The Murgas ARC {K3YTU will sponoor 
the annual Wilkes-Barre Hamfest on Sun- 
day. June 3, lS84j beginning at 6^00 am. 
rain or shine!* at the I09th Armory. Market 
Street^ Kingston (across Ihe rJvef from 
Wilkes-Barre). Admission ts $3^00: Chll* 
dren under 16 and XYLs will t» admitted 
free, There will be indoor and outdoor tali- 
gating at $2.00 per space. Setups only wHI 
be at 6:00 am and tables and commercial 
power will be available. Tall^^li^ on 
I4e.0l/.61 and .52 sfmpiex. For further In- 
formation, write Hamfeat CommlUoe^ PO 
Box 1094, Wilkes-Barre PA 16703. 

SOUTHINQTON CT 
JUN 3 

The Southing! on Amateur Radio Asso- 
ciation vi/lH hoid a flea market On Sunday, 
June 3. 1964. at the Central Elementary 
School. Main Street (Route 10). just out* 
side Southington Onter. Take axU 32 
from I-B4 to Route 10 40uth for 1.4 miles. 



The school is on the right, acm&s from the 
Public Ubmry, Admission la $1.00. Tables 
are £7.00 each in advahce and $6.00 each 
at Ihe doof (no tailgatlng}; two people will 
b& admitted with each labl* purchased* 
There will tie over 30 tabled of new and 
used ham equipment, and hot coffee and 
refreshments will be avaitabie. Taik-^n on 
i^BMtM and 146^650 aimpleii. For a ta- 
ble resefvation. send an SASE af»d check 
(payable^ to SARA, PO Bo* 284, SOMlhing- 
tOhCT 06439, 



PRINCETOHIt 
JUN 3 

The Starved Rock Radio Qub <WBMKS} 
will present its annual hamiest on June 3, 
1964, at Ihe Bureau County FaSrgrounds in 
Princeton IL Registration Is $2.50 in ad- 
vance (before May 20) and $3.00 at the gate^ 
There will be a rtomlnal fee for recreational 
vehicles. Features will Irvclude a free awap 
area, commercial vendor exhibits, an ARRL 
seminar, and plenty of parking. Good food 
will be available. Registrants will receive 
free coffee and doughnuts at 8:00 am, TaJk- 
In on 147,12/J2. l46,07/.67. and 146.52 sim^ 
plejt. For advance registration or more In- 
formation, send a large SASE to 
SRRCAW9MKS, RFD It, Box I7l,0olesby IL 
61346, or phone 0^S}^1-^U, 



COejn D'ALENE 10 

JUN a 

The Kootenai Amateur Radio Society 
will sponsor Hamfest '64 on June 9, 19e4» 
from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, at ttm North Ida- 
lio Fairgmunds, Coeur D'Alan« ID. Swap 
tal>les will be available at no ^wrgei RVs 
are welcome but no hookups will b« avail- 
able on site. The anrkual Friday progjajn 
will include a pot iuck supper and dancing 
afterwards. For further Intormatioa write 
Avon Anderson WB7WBZ. N. 1035 High- 
land Court, Post Falls ID 83854, 



WILLOW SPRINGS IL 
JUN 10 

The Six Meter Club of Chicago^ Inc., will 
hold its 27th annual htmfest on Sunday, 
June 10, 1964, at Sante Fe Park, 91st and 
Woli Road, Willow Springs IL (southwest 
of downtown Chicago). Registration is 
12.00 in advance and $3.00 at the gale. 
Gates will open at 6:00 am end features 
will inciude a large swappers' row. dls^ 
plays in the pavilion, an AFMARS n>eet- 
fng, picnic grounds, refreshments, Mhd 
plenty of partying space. Taik^n oh 146.52 
(K90NA) and JXTiMf (K90NA/R). For ad- 
var>C8 tickels, coniact Val Hellwig 
K9ZWV. 3420 South 60lh Court, Cicero IL 
60650. 

DEALNi 
JUN 10 

The Jersey Shoce Chawlm will spon- 
sor the third annual Ham & Computer Fo^t 
on June 10. 1964, from 9^ am to 4:Q0 pm, 
at the Jewiat) Community Center. iOd 
Grant Avenue, Deal NJ (less than 50 ml led 
from NYC and 70 miles from Phliadeiphia]. 
Admission Is $3.00 per person and chil- 
dren under twelve and XYLs will be admit- 
ted free. Indoor tablea are $6.00 and tall- 
gating spaces are S3.50 each. For re- 
served spaces, send an SASE and pay* 
ment by June let to Jersey Shore Ham- 
fest, PO Box 192, West Long Branch NJ 
07764. Talk-In on 147.045+ .6, 145.1 10 - .6. 
and 146.52 simplex. For more Information^ 
can Arnold W2GDS at (201).222'3OO9. 

CORTLAND NY 
JUN It 

TT>e 2rM3 annual SARC Hamfaai and 



94 73 Magazine * May, 19S4 



Flea Market wl!i be held ofi Saturday, June 
16, 1984, from S:Oa am to 5:00 pm, rain or 
3hln&, at the Ck^fand County Fair- 
grounds, Cortland NY {Exit 12 oft 1-81, mid- 
way between Syracuse and Blnghamton), 
The donation Is S2.00 and jr. opa under 12 
and XYLs wfff be admitted free, indoor ta- 
bias and spaces are $3.00 eacti and under- 
cover (pole-barn) spaces are $2.00 each. 
There will be Jndpor and outdoor f^ea 
markets, acres of free parking, and re- 
freshments. Talk-in on .52 simplex. For ta- 
bia and space reservations, send a check 
to Elmer Fuller, Treasurer, 129 Chelsea 
Twins. Cortland NY 13045, For mora de- 
tails, contact Bud Jackson K2ZER, Sky- 
Woe Amateur Radio CJub^ 8 SunnyfleJd 
Drive, Cortland NY 13045. 

FREDERICK MD 
jyN17 

The Fredefick Amateur Radio Club will 
hold its 7th annual hamfest on June 17, 
1 984, from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, at the Freder- 
ick Fairgrounds. Admission Is $3.00 and 
YLs and children will be admitted free. Ta]l- 
gaters wHI be charged an additional $2.00; 
exhibitors' tables a^e $10.00 for the first and 
$5.00 for each additional one. Gates will 
open tor exhibitors at S:00 pm on June 16, 
1984, and overnight security wdi t>e provid- 
ed. Overnight parking will bQ welcomed. 
For further Information, write Jim DevHbiss 
WA3FUJ, 915 Pine Avenue, Frederick MO 
21701. or phone (301>«a2 5784. 

U^ VEGAS NV 
JUN 21-24 

The YL International Single Sideband 
System's annual convention will be held on 
June 21-24, 1984. at the Sahara Hotel, Las 
Vegas NV. Deluxe accommodations and 
RV parking are availabte for reasonable 
rates. Planned activities include a tour of 
Hoover Dam, a Lake Mead cruise, a gala 
stage show, a cocktail party, a banquet, 
and a breakfast buffet, as well as the DX 
forum and business meetings^ YLRL ladles 
are Invited to meet Thursday evening, June 
21, at 8:00 pm. A convention station will be 
operating on 14,332 kHj. For complete de- 
tails and a registration packet, send a busi- 
ness^ ize 3ASE (37c postage) to Jan Weav- 
er N7YU 2195 East Camero Avenue, Las 
Vegas NV 89123. 



irVOKlA Ml 
JUN 29-30 

The Livonia Amateur Radio Club will host 
the 1984 ARRL Michigan State Convent iwi 
on June 29-30, 1984, on the campus of 
Schoolcraft College, 18^00 Haggerty Road 
at Seven Mile Road, Livonia Ml (22 miles 
northwest of downtown Detroit). School? 
craft is easily accessible via Interstates 75, 
275, 96, or 94. The Swap-N-Shop will be In 
the main gymnasium^ and one of the two 
parking lots will be set aside for trunk sales. 
Major extiibltors w» 1 1 be in the swap area, If 
requested Exhibitors' setups witi be on Fri- 
day, June 29th, from 12:00 noOn until 10:00 
pm, and the displays will be open on Satur- 
day, June 30th, from 8:00 am until 5:00 pm. 
There will be security provided on Friday 
night. For more Information, write Wayne 
W, WJitse K8BTH, General Chairman, 1984 
ARRL Michigan Convention Committee, 
t4468 Bassett Avenue, Livonia Ml 48154. 



SWIFT CURRENT SASK 
JUN 30 

The Saslcatchewan Hamfest will be held 
on June 30, 1984, In Swift Cun-ent SASK. 
Registration will be the evening before. 
Features will include contests, displays, a 
ladles' program, and a banquet. For more 
details, contact the Saskatchewan Ham- 



fest Committee, Box 6, Swift Current SASK 
S9H 3V5, Canada. 

OAK CRESK W1 
JUL 7 

The South Milwaukee Amateur Radio 
Club wlil hold its annual swapfest on Satur- 
day, July 7, 1984, from 7:00 am to approxi- 
mately 5:00 pm, at the American Legion 
Post #434, 9327 South Shepard Avenue, 
Oak Creek Wl 53154. Admission is $3.00 per 
person and Includes a "Happy Hour" with 
free beverages. Parking, a picnic area, hot 
and cold sandwiches, and liquid refresh- 
ments wilt be available. There will be free 
overnight camping. Talk-in on 146.94 MHz 
FM. For more details, including a local 
map, write South Milwaukee Amateur Ra- 
dio Club. PC Bo?; 102, South Milwaukee Wl 
53172. 

BOISSEVAIN MAN CAN 
JUL 14-15 

The 21st annual Intennatlonal Hamfest 
will be held on July 14-15, 1984, at the Irv 
ternational Peace Garden between Dun- 
seith ND and Bolssevain MAM. Activities 
will include transmitter hunts, mobiie 
fudging, and a CW contest. Excel ier^t 
camping facilities will be available. For 
more Information^ contact William W, 
Bosch WOOEMY or Stanley E. Kittelson 
WDdOAJ, Box H, Dickinson ND 5e&0l. 



LOUISVILLE OH 
JUL 15 

The Tuaco Amateur Radio Club (WSZX) 
and the Canton Amateur Radio Club 
(waAL) will present the 10th annual Half of 
Fame Hamfest on Sunday, July 15, 1984, 
at the NImishillen Grange, 6461 Easton 
Street, Louisville QH. Admission Is $2.50 
in advance and $3.00 at the gate. Tables 
are for rent on a reserved basis. Talk-in on 
l46,52/.52and 147.71/, 12. For reservations 
Of more Information, write Butch L&bold 
WABSHP, 10877 Hazelview Avenue, Alli- 
ance OH 44601. or phone (2 16>62 1-8794. 

LAPORTE 114 
JUL 15 

The combined LaPorte^Mlchtgan City 
Amateur Radio Clubs will sponsor their 
Summer Hamfest on Sunday, July 16, 
19Q4, from 8:00 am to 2:00 pm, at the La- 
Porte County Fairgrounds, State Road 2, 
west of LaPorte IN. The donation Is $3.00 
at the gate. Good food, cold drinks, and 
paved outdoor parking wEli t^ available. 
For reservations for indoor tables 
(40<t/foo!), write PO Box 30, LaPorte IN 
46350. 



GLACIER PAf^K MT 
JUL 20-22 

The Great Falls Area ARC will present 
the 50th annual G lacier- Waterton interna- 
tional Hamfest on July 20-22, 1984, at 
Three Forks Campground on the southern 
edge of Glacier National Park. Pre-regis- 
tratlon Is S8.50 and includes Saturday- 
night dinner (bring own meat and utensils) 
and Sunday-morning breakfast. Tatk-ln on 
.52 arni .34/,94. For rrtore Information, 
send an SASE to ShIrFey Smith KC70A, 
1822 14th Avenue South, Great Falls MT 
59405. 



BEAVERTQN OH 
JUL 27-29 

The Willamette Valley DX Club win hold 
the 1984 DX Convention on July 27-29, 
1984, at the (greenwood Inn, Beaverton 
OR. For further Information, wrtte Bob 
Herndon W7XN, 607 Andover Place, Port- 
land OR 37202, or phone (503)-232-274O. 



HOUQHTON Ml 
JUL 2a 

The Copper Country Radio Amateur As- 
sociation will host the 19E4 Upper Pen in- 
sula Hamfest on July 28, 1984, at the Me- 
morial Union Cafeteria on the campus 
of Michigan Technoioglcal University, 
Houghton Ml. For further information, 
write Howard Junk In N8FHF, Co-Ch air- 
man, UP Hamfest, 106 West South Street, 
Houghton Ml 49931, or phone (B06)-4a2' 
4630. 



WEST FRIENDSHIP MD 
JUL 29 

The Baltimore Radio Amateur Televi- 
sion Society (BRATS) wlii present the 
8 RATS Maryland Hamfest and Computer- 
test on Sunday July 29, 1984, at the How- 
ard County Fairgrounds, Route 144 at 
Route 32, adfacent to Interstate 70, West 
Friendship MD, about 15 miles west of the 
Baltimore Beltway (695). Table sales are 
by advance reservation only; indoor tables 
along the wall with ac are $20.00 each and 
indoor tables In the center of the floor 
without ac are $10.00 each. Quant Ety dis- 
counts and booths are available. There 
will be plenty of outdoor tailgating and RV 
hookups will be ava liable. Dealer setups 
begin Saturday at 2;00 pm with overnight 
security provided. Talk-In on 146.76 
(-600), 147.03 ( + 600), and .52 simplex. 
For table reservations and more inform a- 
tion, write BRATS, PO Box 5915, Baltimore 
MO 2120B, or call Mayer Zimmerman 
W3GXK at (30l)-e55-7812. 



LAFAYETTE IN 
AUG 19 

The Tippecanoe Amateur Radio Associ- 
ation will hold its 13th annual hamfest on 



Sunday, August 19, 1984, tieginnlng at 
7:00 am, at the Tippecanoe County Fair- 
grounds, Teal Road and I8th Street, La- 
fayette IN. Tickets are S3^00. Features will 
include a large flea market, dealers, and 
refreshments. Talk-in on A3iJ3 and .52. 
For advance tickets and more Informa- 
tion, write Lafayette Hamfest, Route 1^ 
Box 63, West Point IN 47992, 



CHEflOKEE OK 
AUG2& 

The 2nd annual Great Salt Plains Ham- 
fest will be held on August 26, 1^4, from 
©:0O am to 5:00 pm, at the Community 
Building on the 30Uth side of the Great 
Salt Plains L^ke in north^entral Okla- 
homa. Features will include technical fo* 
rums, organiziatlonals meetings, free swap 
tables, refreshments, Novice exams, and 
a noon pot-luck dirvner. Overnight camp- 
ing and RV hookups are available at the 
Lakes State Pari^. Talk-in on the 147.90/30 
Salt Plains repeater. For more informa- 
tion, write Steven Waiz WA5UT0, Box 222, 
Cherokee OK 73726, or phone ^05^596- 
3467. 



PARAMUS NJ 
OCT 14 

The Bergen ARA will hold a Ham Swap 
n' Sell on October 14, 19fi4. from 8:00 am 
to 4:00 pm, at Qergen Community College, 
400 Paramus Road, Paramus NJ. There 
will be tailgating only; bring your own ta- 
ble. Admission for sellers Is $4.00; tjuyers 
will be admitted free. Thousands of 
spaces will be available. Talk-in on .79/^19 
and .52. For more Information, write Jim 
Greer KK2U, 444 Berkshire Road, Ridge- 
wood NJ 07450, or phone (201)-445 2855, 
evenings only. 



RcEhiester 

HAMFEST 



ATLANTIC DIVISION/NY STATE 

ARRL CONVENTION 

SATURDAY, MAY 19 

MONROE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

ROUTE 1 5A 

Largest Annual Show and 
Fiea Market In Northeast. 




(nfornraticn: 



ROCHESTER HAMFEST 
300 Wiiite Spruce Boulevard 
Rochester, NY 14623 
(716)424-7184 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 95 



i.,i 



BARTER N BUY 



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WYOMING UTAH RANCH LAND. 10 
acres, $60 down, $60/monlh. FREE Infor- 
mal ton, maps, photographs. Trade equity 
for ham gear, home computer, test equip- 
ment, etc. Owner— Mike Gauthter K61CS, 
9550-B— Gallatin Rd., Downey CA 90240. 
BNB001 

MOBILE IQNmON SHIELDING. Free 
titerature. Estes Engineering, 930 Marine 
Drive, Port Angeles WA 9B362. BNBDOe 

COLOR COMPUTER owners— call (212)- 
441 '2807 for FREE color computer hard- 
ware and software catalog or write to 
Spectrum Projects, 93-15 8€ Drive, Wood- 
haven NY 11421. BNB023 

WANTED: Cash paid for used SPEED RA^ 
DAR EQUIPMENT. Write or call: Brian R. 
Eaterman, PO Bok 8141, Northfteld IL 
600&3; (3tZ>-25l-e901 BNBOSO 

PSSTI HEV, wanna mai^e professional 
quality printed circuit boads? One or more 
In only SQ minutes. Simple, inexpensive, 
Hew System, Free 1984 catalog, PIN COR, 
5S0 Palace, Aurora IL 60506; (312)- 
896^15. BNB036 



MILITARY TECHNICAL MANUALS for old 
and obsolete equipment. 60-page catalog, 
$3.00. Miiitary Technical Manual Service, 
2266 Senasac Ave^, Long Beach CA 90816. 
BNB045 

WANTED— your unused Teletype^^ re- 
pair parts. High prices paid! Send BASE 
for list of Teietypevrfrlter parts and sup- 
plies. TYPETflONICS, Box 8873, Fort Uu- 
cterdale FL 33310^ (3aS)-583-l340 after 9:00 
pm. N4TT. SNB052 

WANTED: Old keys for my telegraph and 
radiotelegraph key oo Election. Need 
pre- 1950 bjgs. AM models of Vibropiesc, 
Martin, Boulter, Abernathy, McElroy, etc. 
Also need Spark keys^ Boston keys, large 
or unusual radEoteiegraph keys, slde- 
swiperSp cootleSr homebrew, and foreign 
keys. Meal McEwen K5RW, 1126 Midway, 
Richardson TX 750B1, 8NB063 

WE ENJOY creating ham plaques, tro- 
phies, awards. Pse QSOh Prices^ ship- 
ping—low. Care— free. J i J Trophy, 
Grove Street, Peterborough NH 034&8; 
(603)-924'7e04. BNB065 



WANTED: Pre-1950 TV sets and old TV 
GUIDE magazines. W3CflH, Box 20-S, l^a- 
comb IL 61455; (;J09)-833-18E>a. BNB066 

WANTED: Military surptus radios. We 
need Collins 618T, AflC-72, ARD94, AR£> 
i02f RT-71£/ARC'105, ARC-114, ARC 115, 
ARC-ne, RT-aaa'ARC-ISi or FM622, RT^ 
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RT1167 or RT-1168/ARC-ie4, RT-1299/ 
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490T-9, CU-ie58A/AflC, CU-1669^GRC, 
49aB-1. CU-1239^ARC'ia5, 490D'1. Top 
dollar paid or trade for new amateur gear. 
Write or phone BUI Step, (704)'524-7519, 
Siep Electronics Company, Highway 441, 
Otto NC 2B763. BNB071 

1984 WIRE & CABLE prices cut!!! Call or 
write for latest listings. Certified Com- 
munications, "The CB to 10 Meter 
People," 4138 So. Ferris, Fremont Ml 
49412; (616>-924^4561. SN9073 

KQfiP NOVICE EXAM KIT.^"^ FCC no 
longer supplies written test! The Novice 
Exam Kit provides everything you need to 
give the Novice exam including. , .3 multi- 
ple^holce written exams. , . & code tests 
on cassette (3 tests using 5-wpm charac- 
ters and 3 tests using iS-wpm charac- 
ters), .all FCC forms (610 and PR1035A) 
... plus 'instructions and Helps lor the Ex- 
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from Spirit Publications, 2200 El Cam! no 
Rea! Suite 107, Redwood City CA 940S3. 
Discount toclubsl BNB07B 

SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS. QTH FOR SALE 
4-2-2 with 70-foot tower, etc. WeCM, (512j^ 
684-6129. BN&077 

T|S9Ma RTTY, Mini-memory required. 
Mark and space tones are Internally gen 
erated in send mode. TU Is needed for re* 
celve-only. $17.95. fvlark Schmidt, 4661 
Lark Or,, Beaie AFB CA 95903. BN8078 

"FOOLPROOF LOGGING" program de- 
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avaiiatile for TRS^O Modei III. IBM PC, 
and CP/M^O computers using Microsoft 
BASIC. £35.00 for diskette, manual, ppd. 
"Super-log" written iti dBASE^II source 
code for almost any computer, $50.00. 
Specify disk format. Write for details, GRF 
Computer Services, 6170 Downey AvenuSj 
Long Beach CA 90806. BNB079 

DIGITAL DISPLAYS for FT lOls, TS-520s, 
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KV4/KP2 STATION. ST. THOMAS, Con- 
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ST0P1I SUPER SAVINGS^ Kenwood 
R-2000, $499.50; R-1000, $409.50; 
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Panasonic RF-B3O0, RFB600, call! I 
Uniden CR2021, S20@.50; Regency HX- 
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stock— call! E Bearcat BC100, $2&B,50; 
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rotors, coax, antennas, much, much 
more!! Free UPS shipping and Insurance 
to 46 states, 25 page picture cataEog, 
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44309; (2l6>^76-2402, 9:00-5:00 pm EST, 
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EMERGENCY COMMUNlCATlONS-^An 
Organizational and Operational Hand- 
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guide for ARES/RACES and other public 
service groups, as reviewed In December 
'33 QST and January '64 CQ. $9.95 plus 
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DX HEADING MAPS for Boston, NVC, 
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LA, 11''x17^ $1,75 pp. 22"x34", S5.95 
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COMMODORE 64 CW INSTRUCTOR PRO- 
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spacing set independently. Designed for 
classes and increasing code speed. 
$15.00— diskette or cassette (specify^ 
Dennis Oliver N7BCU, 209O9 S. Ferguson 
Rd., Oregon City OR 97045. BNB095 

STATE-OF-THE-ART, rugged, low- profile 
antenna systems. Helical designs from 
3.5 to 50 MHz. DDRRs from 144 to 450 
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dustries, 25 Imson Street, Buffalo NY 
14210; (716^73-1445. BNB096 

ANTISTATIC OUST COVERS by Cover 
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96 73 MaQSZlne • May, 1984 



brochure. Blfch Hill Sal&s. PO Sox 234, P^ 
IwtiQfQiiQh NH 03458; (6031-924 735^. 
B^^Ba07 

FREE FREE GIFT. I merited in amateur 
radio, computers, ^deo? Large 5A5E pse 
and rnflfi1k>n 73 magazineL Fra^ gift to all, 
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wood NJ 07456. BMBOae 

RKD Oirt what 6l3« you can lM«r on your 
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Complete infomwuion on fna|or North 
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CA 90601. BNB099 

SliLTRQNICS offers TET antenna sys- 
tems with factory backup ar>d perls. Call 
or wrUe for our complete catalog wlih full 
descriptions and specs on th« full line of 
TET antenrias— Ihe beat! For f&st and 
friendly service as tssiJAf, contact Dan 
WD€IDZ or Ntna NfiANU at Suttronkca Am- 
ateur Radio, 15 Sexton Drtve^ Xenla OH 
4S3Sa; (5t3>a7&270Q. BNB102 

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COLUNS: 32S^. 75S-3S. 30L-1. more. Also 
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ICOM SALE'lC-740 Wltft PS-74CI. 
condition. $650, I&22A 2-metef transceiv- 
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FM SERVICE MANUALS— RCA. GE, Mo 
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model and description, T. McLaughUn, PO 
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COLJJKS 5lfiF-2 ac power Supplies for 
^le, $136, used, reconditioned Also ha¥e 
i ferw with bad pcHvsf translormsr^ and 
bent cas^ that I will 39II for parts. Collins 
51BS-1 aircraft radio. $200. Victor Frank 
KSrv, 12450 Sicyline Blvd., Woodside CA 
94062: (415^^1-1570. BNBIII 

FOR SALE: TektronlK 2215 DScI I loscope, 
usfid onc€, $1200, RMl Kevin Lam an, FO 
aOK 9058, NAS Key West FL 33040. 
BNail2 

WANTED: Old keys for my telegraph and 
radiotefegrapli key collection. Meed 
pr#-i9S0 bugs Atr modais of Vibrople}<. 
Maftin, Boutter, Abernathy. Shawplex. 
eic. Al&o need Spa^ ^^Y^i Boston keys, 
Sideswiper?, gnusual keya, Omni graphs. 
Cricket and B4^rme|1 miniatures. Neal 
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TX750B1.BNBlr3 

RADIO SPECIALTIES FM deviation scope 
—$250; Narda 8400 rt powet meter, .01- 
12,4 GHz— S95, SI nget M'19 spectrum 



analyzer, 1 kHz-25 MHz-'|150, KBKZt, 
2255 Alexander, L09 0«o« CA 93402. 
BNB114 

COLLECTOR'S DREAM-Remem&er the 
^Morrow Twins?" Vim age 19561 Very 
ruQQed, htgfi-peffomvance AMCW mobile 
(or quick sUdeKHJt (or bas« use or ttieft 
protection^ XiatMo (Clapp) transmitter 
^146 final). Stacked matchir^ receiver 
(Clapp bfoK 10 through 75 meters, ham 
bends only. Full dial bandspread. Husky 
center^oad remote-luned whip. Cost a 
bundle. Never used! Absolutely new con^ 
d It Ion I Includes dynamotora. Open for 
bids on these "jewels/' Dick Qrlmm (ex- 
VV3TRSJ, 10 LatI squama Rd:, Southboro 
MA 01 772; (617Hai-0458. BNBnS 

IF YOll^RE DM 2211, Subscribe to 220 
NOTES. Write to 220 NQT^S, Dept. 10, 215 
Villa Rd.. Str^mwood tt 60103. BNBlie 

REPATR alignment, calibratioTL Collins 
written estimates, $25: rKirvCoJIins, $50. 
K1MAN. (2D7H3&221S. BN3117 

WANTED: Hallicraftsfs PS ISO- 120 power 
supply. For salec Heathkit HP 23 power 
supply. Sond SASE. R. Goodpaster, 415 
Harmon Hts,, Stanford KY 40464. SNB1T6 



HAM HELP 



t am looidng for a S-fnc^vsquare meter 
that was used in the Coilins 302C3 watt- 
meter. Also a Collins 75S3A. 

Max R. Otto WiLFF 

733 West Benton Street 

kMwa City lA 52244) 

I am requesting aiiy information onTesia 
OOtlS. I need this for a ^lence project. Any 
articles on how to buHd a Tesia coll will be 
greatly appreciated, 

Kent Bajrelt 

141 Gatone Drive 

flMdtmonvills TN 37075 

I am looking for a synthesizer compalEble 
with a Heathkii HW-202 2m FM transceiver. 
Xtals are Ffe(^/24 for Tx and Freq, - 10.7/3 
for fbt t am also looking for a Drake FS-4 
syntheslier. Any mani^la availatsle for 
such devices would also tie apprecialed 

AAefi Col* P44IRI 

PO Box 11282 
Richmond VA 2a230-12S2 



Regarding CB to 10 meters: I would like 
Informatk^ on the c^orrverskm of a Pace- 
Sldetalk lOOOM. 

L Uthim NSFJK 

S£O0 RamJngo Larta 

Alius OK 73521 

I need a sehemailc or other Info for e 
Simpson 260 merles 5 and series 3A» RCA 
WV77E, and El CO 232. I wvili pay shipping 
and copying costs. 

Fred "Al** WasletawskI WA2VJL 

PO Box 1362 
San Benito TX 7S586 

Hammarlund HX« or SOA SSB transmit- 
ter: Looking for info on 160-meter kit, pari 
fPL2686&Gl Of G2, which adds 160 meters 
lo tl^s rig. Will consider lunked HX^ or 
50A with Iff) meters installed as parts 



J^Mi F. Sehrlng WB2EQa> 

PO Box 1072 

Wayne NJ 07470 



Need schematic and^or manual for AM- 
COM S 2-25 2m x^vr. Will pay all expenses, 

Manos G. Dariadakis SV1IW 

Box230S1 
112 10 Atti«rra, Greece 

I am looking for he^p with the prolilem of 
Intaitacing a Heath SS5000 transceiver 
witti a VlC-20 or Corrmodom 64. I have an 
RS^2 interface on the oomfHJtBr and have 
configure it as followsj 

R&232 Serial Output to Soutput on 9000 
RS-23a Serial Inpyt lo Sinpwt on 9000 
Request to send to Qear to sand on 

9000 
Data terminat ready to Data set ready on 

9000 
Data set ready to Data termlnai ready on 

9000 
Signal ground to signal ground 

I am using Vfcterrn 1 software, and need- 
less to say, this configuralion is not work- 
ing. I live on the desert fiere in California 
and am about 150 miles from San Di^go 
and 200 ml^ from Lo» Angetes. There are 
no user^ groups anywt^ere around tfiia 
area, so I don't know where to turn for f>eip. 

I am willing to pay any TB&sontbi6 charge 
for rwlp with thi3 matlw. 

Pick Ham N&IUK 

PO Box 1014 

&riw1iiy CA 92227 



I f^vould like to contact Other harrs who 
have what I term "sophisticated" comput- 
erised RTTY— programs that emulate fancy 
dedicated equipment (e.g., Hal 3100, etcj 
and allow mailbox ops, the sending of a file 
loffrom disk^ etc. Info On $uch programa 
end tfkelr resident computers and required 
interfacing wouM be most graatty ap- 
preciaied. 

I am interred bo4h for my own personal 
Info ^«^ purchase) and because If^ere ts no 
slr^to aoitfce of data on what ts available 
fdr iMliich computer and what the capal>ili- 
ttea and limits are, I intend to compile and 
publish (hat source. 

John Pales* WB9JPH/S 

314 CwJar Band Driva 

MklwasI City OK 73130 

I need a schematic for a Commodore 
VID20 computer. Til pay any reascnable 
charge. 

Wairan J. Kofifvy WBiKIS 

003 Mound Street 

St Pad UN 551D6 

I need a Ktiematlc for a Radio Mfg. Engi- 
naerv. Inc., serial na CM1 recaiver t will pay 
for copying o(^s. 

Ron Janaaiwi 

ROtI 
eulgMPA1S019 




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73 JWagaz/f^e • May, 1984 97 



DR. DIGITAL 



TO IQOO 



Robert SwIrBky A F2M 
PO Box 122 
C&darhurst NY 115W 

CHCX)SING A 
PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE 

Compul«r u^efs are always debaHng 
wtiich programmirtg FanguAge is best. In 
my opinion, W t$ imposait>l< to say which 
one is ''beat." While I tend to use PUl-60 
by Digital Research for most of my pro- 
gramming needs, I canal nly would not 
use It fof evsryttiirHl^ For some appiica- 
ttCHtA, panleulirty for short ^Kogfamt that 
are uam onc« to peflotm a mathemartccl 
caleulatiofi. Ba^ic ia ttM best ctwica:. Fof 
many amaieur-raiiio arid etectron^cs ap- 
plicaliona, programs are vrritten and run 
only oncA to calculate a particular value. 
Onca the needad vaiua i» Qbtained, tha 
program will never oe run again. 

Tha traditional way of comparing Ian* 
guages Is through t^e use of a bench- 
mark—taking the aame atgortthm and 
translating it irtto a number q! different 
lar>guag«s The executtOTi times ^w long 
it iak^ to run^ are then compared and Iha 
fastest one is considered the best, linfor^ 
tunateiy. this mettiod doesn't take the 
amount of time needed to writ^ the pr^ 
gram Into acccHjnt. Also, some languages 
are fast while doing one type of calcula- 
tion and alow for another. PUI^ provides 
a good SMamplB of this! For binary calcu> 
talions It is extremely faatp but when (deal- 
ing with BCD or ftoatJng-poinl nymbom^ It 
creeps. 

To d«monslrate t^t execution times 
ak»ne are not e good way of compart r^ 
languages, I have put tOQether a bench- 
m^fli comparison of ? programming Ian- 
g4ifig«S' four versions of Basic and one 
each of Pascal, Pi/l-ao, Ami Coboi. In this 
comparison, I have recorded the amount 
of time It took to wrJte Ih© program^ from 
the n>oment I sat down et the keyboard to 
the end of the first wording run. I also did 
ajnother sneaky thing; I purposely chose a 
pfoblam that Is not efficiently calculated 
in microcomputer imptementatioos of 
Pascal. PUl. and Cobcri. 

The Basics I used were Applesoft, Ml*- 
crosoft 8aalc-80 (running under a 2MHz 
CP/M aystem)p Atari Basic, and T.A.S.C. (a 
complied Applesoft marketed by Micro- 
soft). The prograrn. wh ich calculates the 
Bum of the mtgofiTj from 1 to 11 
shown In Listing 1. Une 10 is there to 
mit timing— liming starts when RETUfIN 
is hit in response to the INPUT statement 
ar>d stops wt>wi the result appea/s on Itm 
display, pn ttie Atari versjon, I added "S 
DIM AS(tr This was needed becauat 
Atari Basic handles strings differently.) 

WrLtlr^g time for Applesoft, Microsoft, 
and Atari Basics were closer et 38, 44, and 
50 seconds mspectively. Eif&cution times 
were 3.71 seconds for Applesoft, S.O^ sec- 
Qn<^ lor Microsoft Basics, and 5.75 a«o- 
ondfi fof Atari Bash:. It ts Interest ing to 
note ttiat although the Atari^s SS02 MPU 
runs at 1 illlH£ as com|>ared w^th Apple's 
1.024'MHz clocks Atari Basic is sfoiwr by 
a factor of i4V&. This exampte shows that 
CPU speed isn't always a good cfiteriofi 
with which to compare computers. 

T.A.ShC, which stands for The Apple^ 
Soft Compiler, had a "wrltfng time'' of 2 
minutes. 7 seconds. The extra lime is be- 

98 75 Magazine • May, 1964 



cause the oompller checks the program^s 
s^tax and converts it to machine lan- 
guage before any code is actually execul-^ 
ed. In contrast. Baste interpfeters «^. Ap- 
plesoft t cfwck syntax artd SKecute tha 

PROGRAM add; 



10 INPUT A^ 
20 FOR X = 1 
30 S = S + X 
40 NEXT X 
SO PRINT S 

Usting f. Basic. 

code a line at a time. Benefits are realized 
at execution lime; the program toe* oniy 
1.56 seconds to execute — 237% faslef 
than Applesoft and 385% faalar ttian Mi^ 
CTOSoft Baslc^! 



MAR BUMS INTEGER C 61} 
IDX J INTEGER? 

X schar; 



eEGIN (icADDic) 



READLN (X)J 



SUM {" OJ 



F-OR IDX :=^ 1 TO 100 DO 

BUM t^ BUM + IDX} 

WRITELN (SUM) 



END* 



UsfingZ PsscsL 



3dd*proc options (nsirOJ 



di:l K fixed decimal (10,0)} 
del sun fixed decinal (10fO>J 
del f chsrdW 



get list (f); 
SUM =' Of 



do K 

SUM 

end J 



I to 100 t 



put skip list (sijf^>; 
end addj 

Utitffg 3. PIAW. 

IDENTIFICATION DIMISIONt 
PROGRAM- ID* ADO* 
ENUIRONMENT DIMISIDN* 
DATA DIVISION. 
WORKING-STORAGE SECTION* 
77 IDX PICTURE 9999* 
77 SUM PICTURE 999999* 
77 X PICTURE X, 
PROCEDURE DIVISION* 
BEGIN* 

ACCEPT X* 

hOUE ZERO TO IDX* 

MOVE ZERO TO SUM* 

PERFORM ADD-PAR UNTIL IDX = 1001 

DISPLAY SUM* 

STOP RUN. 
ADD-PAR • 

COMPUTE SUM ^ BUM ^ IDX* 

ADD 1 TO IDX» 



Wh^t^ Basic IS best? Certainly, the 
compiled version is the fastest as f ar a3 
execution time. Howevar. it look much 
kmo&f to gel tfte program ready f Of execu- 
tion. For this reason, when writing a pro- 
gram to perform a catculadon that has to 
be done once, a compiled Basic is not 
worth tha SKtra effort. On the other hand, 
If you have to do a few hundred calcula- 
tions, the additional speed would be an 
advantage. 

Pim, Pa scat, and Cottol 

Because they are compiled, PIM, Pa$- 
cai. and Coboi wouhl suffer from trie same 
disadvantagM m TJLS.C. This Is not loo 
surprising. What Is surprising Is Itiai all 
three of them were slower In execution 
Speed than Applesoft Basic. In fact, FU\ 
and Cobol were slower than Baslc^o 

Listing 2 shows the Pascal version of 
the program. Notice that It took 11 lines as 
compared to Basic's 5 ilnes^ maXing It 
22C '/« tong«r It too^ 5 minutes, 7 seconds 
to write, compile, and run ttie program; Bt- 
acutton time alone was 4.52 seconds. The 
mi^Qftof Pascal ( used was UCSD Pascal 
version l.t running on a 2-WiHz Z-60 com- 
puter. UCSD Pascal is not a true compiler 
tt converts the program into an In termed »- 
ate language called P-code^ which Is than 
Interpreted. 

Don*! pet the Idea that Pascal Isn't a 
good language. It contains many^ features 
that would tie diffi^cult, if not impossible. 
to code in Basic. It afso allows fot elabo- 
rate records, structures, and sets. Unlike 
BaeJc it Is a fairiy standard language. I 
can give the program In Usiing 2 to almc^t 
any Pascal compHer and it would run with 
no difficulty. 

PUI-80 produced some disappoint lug 
results (LI sling Z). It took 4 minutes, 49 
s&conds to wrtte, compils, link, and run 
ttie program. Execution time atone was 
ft.13 secoTKlB. slowef than the slowest 
B<dlc {B«ate-80) In our benchmark. 

The PL/1-60 cornpilsr is marketed by Dig- 
ital Research anid ^s my fayorfte micro- 
computer languaQS^ It fs not e ff j cie m 
when calculating fixed-point birury num- 
bers—usually at>out 35 times faster than 
rhe best Basics. Unfortunately, flKod- 
point binary numbers must be In the range 
of - 3276B to + 32767. This is not enough 
for our benchmark program, which pro- 
duces a result of 500500. The siz« of this 
nsuli forced me to use fixed dectrrul 
numbers {wtiich are not computed as efft- 
clentty), slowing the prografn down cofi- 
st^^erably. 

Ariother factor that Slowed PUt-SO Is 
the nature of the language. PUI'80 allows 
mixing of types. For example, the state- 
ment T=HT+'r is perfectly valid— the 
string constant 'V is converted Into a 
number and added to T. The ablUly to con- 
vert from one type ^stringl to anottief type 
(mfmeric) adds considerable overfiead to 
PU1 programs ai>d, not surprisingly. Slows 
thtm dowrt ll Js these same time^wosttng 
f*Bliir«9 that can be llfasav^rs in many 
programming applications and make lor 
more efficient programs. 

The slowest language in our benchmariii 
Is Cobol^O made by Microsoft. Cobol Is a 
business language and Is best at file 
handling and printing tables of decimal 
humbers. Speed in caSculation is not one 
of CobdI's strong porma. 

Wrtttng, oomplllng, Unking, and running 
the Cobol program in Usting 4 took 9 mtiv 
Ules and 27 seconfts. Execution tlrrw 
atone was 22.45 seconds ^373% slower 
than the Basic -80 and 1439% slower than 
T.A.&.C. tt Is clear that Cobol -$0 is noi a 
good choice for numerical calculation, 
However, when working with data files or 
printing oui financial fepoftt, paychecks^ 



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MONEY ORD€R. ( ^^Z!^,, ) 

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n W BUFFALO NY 14803 I 

73 Magazine * May, 1984 




99 



Of accounts racervabl8« ft 1i a pood 
etiolce. 

ConctuikHHi 

Wtilch JAnguagt Is best? As you can 

io«, U Is hard to amwer ttiat qu«stloa 
You've proDably h«ard that PaacaF ^s 'gie^ 
t«f" ttiafi Basic, or that PU^ is ttie fast- 
Mi corr%pll«d tanguag« for miJcrDCorripul- 
#rs. biut OS you can soe from benchmark 
msults. Ihli i9 not always the case. In 
I, for a \onQ i^rogram, PUI or Pascal 



will execute faster than any Baste. 
Kowevflf, when writing a program to do a 
specific malhaiTiatlcal calculatlofi. Basic 
tt often the best choice. It is cwlftlnly 
qutckef to get a Baa^c pfogram mnr^irtp 
than a PUI program — no compiling or link- 
tng Es necessary^ 

InddenUlfy, the ts^t clwfot is some^ 
tImM no computer pfogram at aJil ijst's 
ttM^ anoiHef took at the p>roi>tdm aolvwt by 
o<jf benchmark program: finding Iht turn 



of the numbers from 1 lo 1000< The pro^ 
gram calculates this by adding ^^2'¥ 
3+ 4+... + 1000, Howev«rJt canal flo be 
looked at aa addling (lOOO-f t)-t-{9^ + 
aj+«We^3)+... +^1 + 500^ Vouli no- 
tl^ that the nuinber wriNn ihe parenthe- 
ses always adds up to )001. anfd you are 
adding this to itself 500 ttmoft. By multt- 
paying 1001 by 5O0, wtii&h can easily b« 
done In one's head, One COm«fl up wittt 
500500. The same method can b« uMd to 
find the sum of any otfisr sari i n of nuitv 



tiers. Forixample, the sum of the imegefs 
from 1 to 250 is equal to 2S^ times 125, or 
31375, 

Wh«n I firtt discussed programmtng 
languages a fdw months ago, I was sur- 
ptrised by the amoyni ol Interest the sub- 
ject oefhsfaled; my poal-office box was 
overftowfng! t hope thts column dears up 
some of the mystery suf rounding the vmrt- 
Qua languages available to ttie mi^ocom^ 
puter u&er. 



May 



J un 



J 

3 

4 
% 

b 

7 

i 

9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
I? 

la 

14 

30 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2« 
27 
2a 
29 
30 
31 
1 

a 

3 
4 
5 
A 
7 
fi 
9 

to 



mELLlTES 



Amateur SHtiilllt* Rofflr«nce Orbita 



OSCAR B 



0021 
0025 
0029 
0034 
003S 
0O42 
0047 
0051 
005S 
QlOO 
0104 

01 oa 

0113 
0117 
0121 

OUfr 
Olio 
0134 
011$ 
0000 
0004 
0009 
0013 
0017 
OQ22 
0026 
0030 
00 35 
0039 
O04 3 
004a 
0012 
0056 
0101 

eios 

0109 
0114 

ona 

0122 
012? 
0131 



101 
102 
103 
104 
IQt 
107 

too 

i09 
110 
Ul 
112 
113 
114 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
9* 
99 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
107 
lOfl 
109 
UO 
111 
U2 
113 
lU 
115 
117 
U4 
119 
120 



llS-5 
UTC EQX 



RS-6 

UTC eqx 



RS-7 
UTC EQX 



0110 
0104 
005 5 
0054 
004 a 
0041 
0038 
0O32 
0027 
00 It 
OOH 
0011 
0005 
OOOO 
0154 
0149 
0144 

0I3B 
0133 
012fi 
0122 
0117 
0U2 
0106 
0101 
0056 
0050 
0045 
0040 
0034 
0029 
0024 
0013 
0013 
0007 
0002 
0156 
0151 
0146 
0140 
0135 



70 
70 
70 
71 
7 J 
71 
71 
71 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
71 

103 
103 
103 
103 
tOl 
104 
104 
f04 
i04 
104 
105 
103 
105 
105 
105 
106 
106 
106 
106 
106 
107 
107 
137 
137 
137 
137 
13i 



0156 
0141 
0125 
QUO 
00S4 
0039 
0024 
0006 
0152 
0136 
0121 
0103 
0050 
0035 
0019 
0OO4 
0147 
0132 
0116 
OlOt 
0€45 
00^0 
0015 
0151 
0142 
012? 
0112 
0056 
0041 
0025 
0010 
0153 
0138 
0122 
0107 
0012 
0016 
0021 
0003 
0149 
0133 



86 
83 
St 
79 
76 
74 
72 
99 
97 
95 
92 
90 

a9 

15 
S3 

110 

loa 

106 
103 
101 
99 
96 
124 
122 
119 
117 
1 1 5 
112 

no 

108 
135 
113 
110 
128 
126 
123 
121 
119 
146 
144 



0022 
0013 
0003 
0152 
0143 
0133 
0123 
0114 
0104 
0054 
0045 
0035 
0026 
0016 
000« 
0156 
0146 

0136 
0127 
0117 
0107 
005S 
0040 
OOIB 
0029 
0019 
0010 
0000 
0U9 
0140 

0130 
0120 

oni 

0101 

0051 
OQ4 2 
0032 
002 2 
0013 
0003 
0153 



to 

59 
58 
B7 
86 
85 
B4 
83 
B2 
S2 
M 
BO 
79 
7§ 
77 

m& 

105 
104 
103 
103 
102 
101 

too 

99 

98 

97 

96 

95 

125 

124 

123 

122 

121 

120 

119 

US 

117 

1L7 

llfi 

115 

144 



Hs-e 

UTC EQK 



Q139 
0136 
0133 
0130 
0128 
0125 
0122 
Oil 9 
0U6 
0113 

om 

01 OB 
0105 
0102 
0059 
0OS6 
0054 

00 51 
D04S 
0045 
004 2 
0039 
0037 
0034 

0031 
002e 
0025 
0022 
0020 
0017 
0014 
0011 
0003 
0005 
0003 
0000 
0157 
0134 
0151 
0148 
QI45 



73 
74 
75 
76 
76 
77 

?a 

79 

80 

SO 

Bl 

82 

83 

S4 

83 

S5 

86 

87 

BO 

89 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

133 

133 

134 

135 

136 



DatQ 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

n 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

16 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

17 

28 

29 

30 

31 

I 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 



FREE SATELLITE 
PREDICTION BULLETINS 

Free satetnt&orbJl-i3f edict ion chans are 
ava^able from NASA on the folloMing am« 
aieur-radio satallltfts (NASA Idenllf tcation 
Numbe< ts If^ parent heses): OSCAR 0(1981 - 
100BJ, RS-3 n3fi1-120Ah ftS4 n&3t-l2GO), 
FS-5 (I0ai-120G), RS-6 (1981-120F), RS-T 
(1d81-120E), l^-a (1^1-120B). and OSCAR 
10 (1963-58B). 

In order to fully u ndef stand the bullotir^s. 



ask fof ttM "Forma! Explanation of the 
NASA Prediction Bulletin," Also request 
the ""Map Ovodajr M^hod oT Hand Gompul- 
ing Slatlon Prodlctiona." This wJII show you 
how to det&fmine viewing angles and times 
front your station. 

Send your requ&ai to; R. V. Tetrlck, Head, 
Project Operations Branch, NASA, God- 
dard Space Filgtit Geniar, Qreenbelt MD 
20771. rriiank$ to Carl S, Zillch AA4MI for 
this Information.) 



CORRECTIONS 



i I wmiwtlh a revfsftd negative fot the cir- 
die board In ttie article r Build the NASA 
D e epoO which i sent to you and whk^ wm 
pub^lsiied on page SB of the Mifieii, 1084. is- 
sue of 73. In dnclttrig the pmoft of the 



boam, I Inadvertemly coiiipa#sd Fl to e dif- 
fofent earlier negative which weft in «rfor. 
PiMSe accept my Apolggiet, 

NteHeiM Van di Sende K04Q 

A/den W 




HAM HELP 



I want a program tor a Commodore 64 
where I can put tn my latitude and long^lude 
end the other atattcm's latltudiilofigitude 
•nd ge4 the othet sMlon's dbtane^ In 

I have tried converting pmgrams for thift 
wtttten for the RAdio StUtCk rrKMlelS 1 and 3, 
Heath, and H^wt^t-Packard 9645 and can- 
fiol gat any to run. Also, one written for the 
V1D-20 didn't work elthaf. 

Q^ P«|ne KEeCZ 

1347 E. Dakota 

Fresno CA 9^704 

I need the 9cf>emetlc and operattr>g man- 
ual tof the Knight TR-106 fr^neter tranfl- 
ceiver with the model VAQ7 rerDOte vfo. Any 
help will be apiifeciated. 

P. J. Wfaia KASIIZL 

TOCiay 8L 

litffnfKtM Ml tSftSO 



I wani someone to have a aked with me 
to Increase rny CW speed Mu«t me key^ 
board and atart at 25 wpm. For more tnfo, 
call {304^885-215?. 



VanMrliKXAr 
RL£.ioK3«X 
MolOMtaWHi WV 2«50& 

I would Ilka to hear from anyone who haa 
modJIIcationa to put the Ten-Tec Omni on 
^(Hmtm FW. 

Stephen J. O'Malley M20li 
14€*2)e Poplar Ave. 
Flushing NY 11S&5 

I need help on the Galaxy (Hy^ain} R430 
sniid-atate general-coverage receiver. The 
pheae-loci^ oscillator is not working, i nmd 
any Inforrrtatlon on parts 30urcea» atlgn- 
mentftroubleahootlng data, or IndMdiiele 
wtw cm repair ij anyone wants to stan an 



R^30 club or newsletter or knowe of same, 
contact me. 

Jim Tiaiier K£¥ZS 
itt Karli Orlw 

WfiHehPu** TX 7sm 

t used a aervk^ manuaJ or achematlc or 
copy of aafna fof a Yaaa4j FM rr-202R 
t)anidte4aJkU& Also need crystal s for 2 
metefs or charger. 

Cyril T. Wolff WATLOV 

S. &507 Ilafsh*t1 Roed 

Spokane WA 8t204 

I neod a. schWWtiG and operatl^on man^ 
ual for DuMcnt 274 &oope. I will gladly pay 
copying co$ts and postage. 

Itefaait A. JeNneen N7CFX 

933 E OwlMi m. 

Sealtta WA DSlOa 

I have recently purchaoed a Radio Shack 
TR&60 model 10O and would like to know if 
thene Is any ham software avaFJabre for it 
commercialiy. I am particularly interested 
In any QW serxlf receive and RTTY software 
and wouFd appr^iate having tho nam^t Of 
any compani^ that ir^ght have sudi 
sys^tems. 



Information about aoftware for otfier 
computers that mn Basic woukj even be 
hetpfiji, aa i mitm inai i eouid adapt it for the 
fTWleliOOL 

0a^ C. Eanai fl4A2i 
BstOfinoMoeLATOm 

Wamed: tifo transceiver fof a Hammar- 
lund SF600JX-1 a^ 4526 {R274C/FRR 6S0|, 
part number 31160-1. Also have a box ol 
colle for t^^aHonal RAC>4 which I will donate 
to the firsi taker. 

PefarOoheftyWIIIO 

f»OBoit291 

Port Tfmrmend WA M^SA 



About 25 years ago, Emerson (I believe) 
came out wElh a portable radio powered by 
batterEes and/or a built-in sdar coll. They 
only made a few. {\ wonder why?) It worked 
well with tioth sun and art if lei at light. I 
wouid like the name and address of the 
manufacturer since I want one ot these old 
radios. 

0« R. Eslrada 

186^40lhAm 

San Francisco CA 94122 



1W 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



— SOmVARE — 

Supporting nil COMMODORE «««nfiutfln 

WrittHii by useri, fof usarA 
if GAMES * UTIUTIES it EDUCATIOHAL^ 



toll&elk)^ 4^1 - ^o^tection #2 - callaciiDn #3 

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onty. Only a screwdriver required to install a kit in attic, closet or even base- 
ment. A cubical space 1/8 wave length on a stde wilf hold it. Requires neither 
fjround connection nor radiafs* Provides a range at least equal to a dtpole— 
ocal or DX — and has large capture area. 

The DXHA can be vertically polarized omnidirectional, or horizontally 
polarized, bidirectional and steerable. Other features:.. Jow SWR at 
resonance... band width at 15:1 typically 3-5% of resonant frequen- 
cy,., couples direct to 50-ohm coax ... no balun or matcher . . . low-noise recep- 
tion... tunable... handles up to 1 KW 

Plans Si kits: 2-meter, rod & tubing at $39.95; others wood & wire with 
6~meter at $47.95; 10-meter at $5495 & T5-meter at $67.95. Others on special 
order, prices on request. Plans only $1250. Send check or M.O. to 

H. STEWART DESIGNS 

RO. Box 643 - Oregon City, OR 97045 -^16? 



SATELLITE TVRO RECEIVERS 



Discontinued SVS 1800R Wireless Remote Receivers 

Reconditioned 
Polorator I control built-fn 

Schematics included 

Service center address included 

Suggested list price $695.00 

Cost: $275,00 cash & carry 

Guarante^e: 4$ hours— less $25.00 

hand ling charge 
Warranty: r^one 




1101 West Elm St. 

Cabat, AR 72023 

(501)84S^S95 



JIM i« mil I If I III II I III I itni III I II I II I ti HI I mil i m iti m in i ii in 11:1 ■ iii t ti 1 111 hi lii itii iti iti 1 m 1 ti 1 11 tti 1 m 11 111 1 iiii m m 1 1 11 i>i 111 m 1 m u ■ im m it 1 1 ni ■ 1 li 1 u 1 ■«■ 1 m 11^1 iiii iii 11 1 1 iti pi iu 



See Ust Of Advertts&rs or* page f t4 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 101 



/IIIMRDS 



BUI Gosney KB70 
MicrO'dO, Inc. 
2665 North Busby Road 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 



TEN-METER FM AWARDS 

Sponsored by the North Whidbay Inland 
Repeater Asaoolatlon (HWIRA). 

AW contacts, to be valid, must have 
been made on or after January 1, 1981, 
Grossmode contacts do not count Con» 
tacts must be 2- way ten-meter FM. 

Special endoraements can be made for 
all -mobile, all*8lmpjex, and alngle-fra^ 
quency accompllshmenta and contacts 
made within a gingie day; week, montti^ or 
year. 

Mote: Members of lh© NWIRA monitor 
29.600 MHz, as wall as the area repeater 
on 29.640 MHz {af\ tSOO^Hz tone or whistle 
la required to accesa). 

Do not send QSL c^rdal Forward your 
Mat of contacts showing the date, time^ 
and frequency of each Q50 and provide a 
brief station description, along with ttie 
fee of $4.00 for each award to: Ten-Mator 
FM Awards Program^ 2665 North Byaby 
Fload, Oait Harbor WA 98277. 

Worked All DIstHots Awaid 

To qualify^ applicants must wofk one 
teri'meter FM station in each of the ten US 
caii districts. 

Worke>d AM States Award 

Applicants must work e minimum of fif- 
ty US states on ten meter FM. 

Centurlofli Award 

This award requires the applicant to 
work a minimum of 100 stations on ten- 
meter FM. 

DX Decade Award 

Applicants must work a minimum of ten 
DX stations outside the fifty US atataa 
and Canada on ten-meter FM. 

Nortli American Awerd 

To quaiify; applicants mjst work all ten 
US call districts* a minimum of six Cana* 
dian provinces and/or territorfea^ and at 
least fojr DX countries within the North 
American continent (other than the US 
and Canada} on ten-meter FM. 

OPERATING ACHIEVEMENT 
AWARDS FROM AB MAGAZINE 

Fa»f»Scsn ATV Award 

^'Getting the amateur tei avis ion station 
operating Is an award In Itsdf!" This 
award oertfflcate recognizes the "first" 
amateur television two-way contact En- 
dorsements for DX miteage and color ATV 
are available. Contacts via ATV repeaters 
are allowed. Award Inscriptions are made 
around the border of the AS block. Black 
and white, 8" X 10'. 

Ilaaler Soanner 4$ S5TV Award 

This award certificate recognizes the 
serious SSTVer. Entry level is 100 two-way 
QSTV contacts. Endorsements for 500, 
1000^ 1500, 2CXH)» etcv, are available. Spe- 
cial endorsement for color SSTV is avail- 
able with verified print copy. A must for 
every SSTVerl Gold, 8" x 10". 

102 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



3p«c1aNzed Com muni cation* 
Acli1«viin»nt Award 

This award recognizes accomplbh- 
menta In ATV, MSTV, NBTV, SSTV, fax, 
RTTY, EME, mJcrowavaa^ and satellites. 
Entry levels are contacta over 1D0 miles 
on ATV. Special -event ATV projecte, 25 DX 
country contacts on SSTV^ reception of 
HF MSTV or fax signals via amateurs, mi- 
crowave DX, ^0 DX foreign countries vie 
EME, 10 two-way contacts on an amateur 
satellite^ and 25 DX countries on flTTY are 
required, with special endorsements 
available tor additional contacts. Certifi- 
cates are numbered aa received; Tr>ey are 
gold, B" >: 10'\ and suitable for framing. 

Worked Ail States SSTV 

Work all 50 states (including Hawaii 
and Alaska) with exchange of callsign and 
signal report in video. A special WAS map 
Is available to color In the states as you 
get them. This Is an ongoing award not 
limited to the annual contests Special en- 
dorsements are available for muKiband 
WAS. 

Worlced All States RTTY 

Work all 50 states (Including Hawaii 
and Alaska) with log copy verification. 
This Is an ongoing award not limited to 
the annual contest. Special endorse- 
ments are available for multlband WAS. 

Good image Award 

Awarded at the Dayton Hamventlon 
each year, the Good Image Award Is pre- 
sented to the individual or group of indl- 
vidua la wfvo contributed to the advance 
n>ent of the A5 code of communication by 
technical achievement or public aware- 
ness. Top-of-the-JIne award I 

Alt AB Msgaitne awards require sub- 
script Ion- tatDel information date codes, 
Encioae Si. 00 for the coat of the award 
certificate and 50 cents postage for return 
mailing {envelope Is provided). Allow 2-3 
weeks for verification and mailing. Send 
all requests to Awards Manager, A5 Msqa- 
line, PO Box H, Lowden I A 52255-0408. 
Winners of awards will be pul:>lished on a 
regular basis \nAb Mag^iin^. 

CENTRAL STATES VHF 

SOCIETY OPERATING 

AWARDS 

At the 1981 Central States VHF Confer- 
ence In Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in Au- 
gust, the Central States VHF Society for- 
mally announced its new operating 
awards program with three colorful 
awards for VHF/UHFiSHF bands. 

Each award was designed to stimulate 
activity on tfie bands above 144 MH2. The 
differences in the awards as well aa the 
variety of endorsements available provide 
chailenginp but achievaiD^e goals regard- 
less of the station's geographic iocatlon 
or capabilities^ 

The awards are open to all amateurs- — 
not just CSVHF Society members. To re- 
ceive rules and application sheets, send a 
legal -siie SASE (with two stamps) to Bob 
Taylor WB5LBT, 10715 WaverEand, Baton 
Rouge LA 70615. 

General Rules— All Awanjs 

The awards described below are avail- 
able to all amateurs worldwide who sub- 
mit details of the required contaote (on 



the separate award applloatlon detail 
Bheet) and have the accuracy of the appii- 
cation certified by a local m&rvitm In good 
standing of the CSVHF Society. In addh 
tlon to the basic awards, certain optional 
endorsements are available as deacrlbed 
below and en the application cover aheet. 
For ell awards, direct two-way commu^ 
ntcation muat be estabilahed on amateut' 
radio bands of 144 MlHz and above. Mini- 
mum contact requirements are the ex- 
change of cal la igns and signal rsporta (or 
other mutually understood Information) 
and receipt of aci^nowledgement that 
both stations have received this Informa^ 
tlon. Ail contacts for each award must be 
on the same band. 

Contact a muet be made from the same 
iocatlon or from other iocation(s) licensed 
to the application, no two of which are 
more than 50 miles apart- 
Con tacts for the VUCD and WHG 
a\vafda may be made over any period of 
years, with no starting date, but numtiered 
certificates will be issued only to those 
who have made the required contacts af- 
ter August 1, ld@l. 1K Coverage Award 
contacts must be made during any two 
consecutive months after August 1, 1981. 
Contacts made through "repeater^' de- 
vices or any other power-re lay method do 
not count toward any of the awards. In ad- 
dition, no Ofossband contacts are per- 
mitted. 

False statemams on the application 
cover sheet or on the detail sheet(s) shall 
result In immediate diaquailflcatlon for 
any of the awards. 

Remember, you do not have to be a 
member of the CSVH F Society to apply for 
an award, l-iowever, if you wish to join, 
send the S5.00 mernbershlp dues to: Ted 
Mathewaon W4FJ, CSVHF Society Secre- 
tary, 1525 Sunset Lane, Richmond VA 
23221. Please do not send dues with 
awards applications. 

VUCC 

The VUCC (VHRUHF Century Club) 
award ainvply requires contacts wFth 100 
different amateur stations. Optional en- 
dorsements for working add it ion 9 1 sta- 
tions In Increments of 25 (e.g-^ 125, 150, 
175^ etc.) or for making all the contacts 
during a Single calendar year ^Jan. 1 
through Dec. 31) are available only if all 
the contacts were made on the same 
mode of propagation {sporadic E skip, 
£ME, meteor scatter, or aurora). 

1KCA 

The IK Coverage Award rsquires con- 
tacts of sufficient number and distance 
such that tf^e sum of the QSO points for all 
the contacts during each of any two con- 
secutive calendar months is equal to or 
greater than 1000. The QSO points for any 
given contact are the band points multi- 
plied by the distance points. The band 
points are determined as follows: 144 = 2, 
2H) = 5, 432 ^ 4, 1295 = 5f 2300 = 10, 3300 = 
15, 5650^25, and 10 QHl and up = 50 The 
distance points are simply the number of 
1-degree-by-1 -degree "gr^ds" (see definition 
under WHG Award) you are away from the 
other station's 1<legree^y-1-de3fee grid. For 
example, if the station is In the next grid over 
from yours ^ the distance point for the contact 
la 1; if It is two grids over, the distance points 
are 2, etc. Contacts In your own grid have a 
distance point value of i. For stations which 
are not in a grid directly north, south, east, or 
west of yours (t.e., off at an angle), the 
distance points have to be calculated. In 
such cases, the distance points are equal to 
ttve square root of the sum of the latitude dif- 
ference squared and the longitude difference 
squared, where the differences in latitude 
arxj longitude are measured In numbers of 
whole 1-deQrefrl:ry-i -degree grids. Tt>e result- 



ing distance points are to be rounded off to 
the nearest tenth. Only one contact with a 
given station per GMT day counts toward 
this award, and EME contacts do not count, 
There are no additional endorsements 
avail able for this award. 

WHO 

"Hie WHQ (Worked Hundred Grids) award 
requires contacts with stations in 100 dif- 
ferent 1-degre&by-1-degrse geographic 
grids. The grids are defined as the area 
bounded by Integral valuea of latitude and 
longitude. For example, a station whoaa 
longitude Is 112 degrees 32 minutes 15 
seconds wast and latitude Is 37 degrees 25 
minutes 16 seconds north would be In the 
grid 112W37N. All stations are urged to In- 
clude their latitude and longitude andi/cr 
equivalent recognized QTH locator code on 
their station cards to assist others in deter- 
mining their grid. If you have to determine the 
other station's grid yourself. It can t>e done 
eaaiiy by Eooking up the town location in any 
good road atlas and then locating the posi* 
lion on a larger map which shows the 
1 -degree Unas of latitude and longitude. Two 
suct^ mapa are Hated t^re: 

1. "h^ap 2*A" comes in two hatves 
^"xBO' assembled) and is available for 
$3.00 postpaid from; Branch of Distribution, 
US Geological Survey. Federal Center. 
Denver CO 80225. Shown are counties, coun- 
ty seats, capitals, and cities larger than 
500,000^ 

2. Rand McN ally's "Cor^temporary United 
States" measures 3€"x54" and is available 
through bookstores for $2.96, The map does 
not show counties but does Include major 
highways, a numt?er of cities and towns, and 
3 degrees more latitude in Canada than the 
USGS map. 

Optional endorsemertts are available for 
wodcEng additional 1-degreetiy-l -degree 
grids In increments of 25 (e,g., 12S, ISO, 175, 
etcO or for working all the different grids In a 
single calendar year. 



MARCO POLO 

We are proud to announce that the Cat- 
anzaro, Italy, chapter of ARl, Associazione 
Radtoamatori Italiani, issues an interna- 
tEonai OX award called Marco Polo, in order 
to commemorate the long and difficult trav- 
els of this Italian explorer throughout Asia, 
starting from Venice In the XIII century. 

This award Is available to any QM/SWL 
who is a member of the lARU section of his 
own country and exempflfies the bam spirit 
through a reenactment of the trail of Marco 
Polo over the airwaveei by establishing con- 
tacts with the various areas mentioned or 
crossed by the fanK>us Venetian. 

A brief summary of the rules is listed be- 
low; The cost is S4.00 plus $1,00 for mail 
coverage; endorsen^ents cost $1.00. For a 
oomplete copy of \Ym rules or any Inquiries, 
contact Award Manager IBQLI, Gianni Ver- 
degiglio, PC Box 19, 88100 Catanaaro, Italy, 

We think that a large number of DX hunt- 
ers will be interested in qualifying for this 
diploma. Tfiis award requires skill, dili- 
gence, and unrelenting effort In pursuing by 
radio the ancient trail of iVIarco Polo. Here's 
hoping that this award will enhance your 
pleasure for DX. 

Siimmary of the Rules 

1. This award is available to &ny OM/SWL 
member of an lARU chapter. 

2. The contacts must be established with 
countries deacritjed by the Venetian explor- 
er Marco Polo In his boolt, U MHione {Th& 
Mtttiofj]—^GQ box^ following page. 

3. All modes are valid, except cross band^ 

4. Only one QSO will be considered for 
each country; the operations must be valid 
for DXCC, in accord with the rules of ARI^L 

5. Various scores are attributed to differ- 



UST OF COUNTRIES— MARCO POLO AWARD 
AiMi or CoimtriM FivllXiM P«kikB 



C^nt^tl Greecs 

Syrfa 

Iraq 

IfAO 

Turkey 

Armenta 

Azerbellan 

Qttorgii. 

Turkoman 

UztMlih 

immm 

Kirghiz 
AJm« Am 
Mongolia 

Taiwan 

D|ll>outi 

MaaaJ 

Madagascar 

Kuantjtung 

South Korea 

Japan 

Mataya 

Bay of BangaF 

Sfsm Quit 

Tibet iitd Hymalaya 

India fieaa GyjaraQ 

Gyja/at {Weat indit) 

Srt Lanka 

Sumatra 

Bo/mm 

Java 

Yemen area 

Oman 

PsfsJan Qulf 

Ethiopia 

Somalia 

I^nzlbar, Pemba 



SV4 4 

4X, AZ 1 

YK 4 

Yl 4 

EP 4 

TA 3 

UOd 3 

uoe 1 

UFa 1 

UHS 2 

US 2 

UJB 2 

UlWId 3 

UL7Q 3 

JT 7 

BY 19 

BV 10 

i£ 2 

5H3 or 5Z4 3 

5F! e 

CRSorVS6 6 

HL a 

JA 1 

Um or 9V1 S 

KZ Of S2 10 

HS CKT XU 5 

9NorA5l 10 

VU 2 

VU 8 

4S7 2 

YB4, 5. 2 

YB7 Of VSS Qf 9M6, 8 6 

YBi,1,2.3 2 

4W or 70 e 

A4X 3 

A6, AT, A9, 9K or HZ 4 

ET tD 

T5,60 7 

5Ht 7 



meoumiies. in ofder to remark the skJll or 
the intwvst: countries ra^efrsd lo same 
gaogfapni^al area are seorod only <ine« 
(aee l(ai>. 

6, Con I acts are vaild starting from Janu- 
ftfy 1. 1978, 

7. ni0 award Is issued In five cla^Se^: T. 
Baas award, at least 60 pplnt«— S^olor dh 
pioma; 2, Silver award, a I teaat 80 points— 
3-color diploma, shield; 3. Gold award, at 
(east 95 points— 3-co1 or diploma, shield; 4. 
Honor Roll, at least 110 points— 3-oolof 
diploma, medal; and 5. Top Honor Roll, at 
least t2S points — 3^color dipiloftm, medal. 
Ewlofiarvwits are availati^ eadi year tor 
cfAM ennanotmmL 

B. QSO liitad with band, mo<te. dale, and 
GMT and signed t^y at leasl two hams that 
are members of OXCC or WAZ rnust be sent 
to Award Managi^r ISQU, Glan^nl Verdeglg- 
Ho, PO Box 19, 88100 Gatanzaro, Italy. QSL 
ffont^back photocopies are accepted In 
aubstliutlon of signatures: however a iiat 
must be provided. 

9. The coal of each class of diploma Is 
$5,00 ($4,00 p{ys $1.00 tor mail coverage)^ 
Any andprsamem must t» aooompanied by 
a now general list^ number of diploma and 
S1.00 plus SAE. 

m Ttw awani mamow may request orlg^ 
IfHl fTHteriil or plwi ooop iw to eonfimi va- 
lldtly. 

11, Atterations, false decMarailons, or 
other Irregular o^ierations will be con- 
sidered cause for disqualification. 

12, Inquiries should be addressed lo ARi» 
GouncH of Chapter, Boi^ 20Q, 88100 Catarv 
zaro, Italy. No other judgment will be con- 
sidered 



ONTARIO BtCENTENN(AL 
AWARD 

SpOfWOnd by ttie Radio Society of Ontar- 



io* Inc. Contacts valid only for January 1 to 
D«e*Tiber 31. ^964. 



VE3 Static 

Contact 200 different VE3 or portable 
VE3 staiiona. One point each. 

Othar V£, VO, VY 

Stations contact IQO different VE3 or pcr^ 
table V£3 statlona. Two points each. 

OX Stations Including USA 

Contact 20 different VE3 or portable VE3 
«t*lkin& Ten points each. 

Any mode or band endorsed at your wish, 
Slieciat seaEs for each 200 esclra points. If 
VE3 stations are using special cat! or prefix, 
itwy count double. No QSL cards neces- 
sary. Send certified log data and $i ,00 or 3 
IRCs to: VE3i.SS, Bicentennial Prolect, Us- 
towel District Secondary SctiooL Geogra- 
phy Departrrrant. Ustowei, Ontario, Canada 
HASN 2M4. 

1««4 SpedakEwfit Stations 

VE3SA&— St, Catharines, Ontario, Can- 
ada. bicentennial station. QSL via Dave 
Digweed VE3F0t, 12 Frederick Street, St. 
Catharines. Ontario, L2S 2S2. 

VE3VM— August 4, 5. and B, special op- 
eration from Burgyon Woods, St. Catha- 
rines. Ontario, by rneml»fs ot Niagara 
Peninsula ARC. QSL to PO Box 692* St. 
Catharines. Ontario, L2R iY3, 

USA amateuf? can use US stamps on 
SAS£, mall will be sent from Niagara Falls 
NY USA; this is tor special-event stations 
only. 



ARMED FORCES DAY 1964 

^'MEETING THE CHALLENGE" 

This ywf's dsm^AncB of Armed Forc«8 
Day. set for Satyndayp May 19, marlcs f1>e 



itaiioii 


Mllliiry Frtqtieney Emlstlon 


Amatayr Band 


AtR 


4025 l«H{ 


LSB 


3a00*4000 kHz 


mmm 


NB&JicHl 


CW 


7025-7150 kl^ 


Communication Group 


TSOaSkHz 


RTTY 


7080-7100 kHz 


AfNlrttwi Air Pof ce Base 


7315 KHz 


LSB 


7225-7300 kHz 


Wtthlngton OC 


1J988,SkHz 


RTTY 


14060-14100 kHz 




13997,5 kHz 


CW 


14000-14150 kHz 




14408 kHz 


USB 


T4150-1 4350 kHz 


NAM 


14400 kHz (see opefating schedule below] 


Naval Communication 








Area Master Station I^NT 








Norfolk VA 









14400 0|>ftratine Schedule 

Bnlsalon Time Amateur Band 

CW 130(^1700 14000-14150 kHz 

FTTTY 1700-2200 14060-14100 kHz 

USB 2200-0245 141S0-143S0 kHz 



Station 

NAV 

HQ Navy- Marine Corps 

MARS 

Radio Station 

Cheltenham MD 

NMH 

Coast Guard Radio Station 

Alessandria VA 



llllitary Frequency 

7372.5 kHz mTY 
14389.5 kHz SSTV 



iMnateur Band 
7060-7100 kHz 
14^5-14235 kHz 



4015 kHz 

7348S kHz 

14440 kHz 

20937.5 km 



NMN 73&3 

Coas4 Guard Communlcatlori Station 
Portsmouth VA 



kHz 



Naval Communication 

Station 

Stockton CA 



* Except 1010^10115 kHz 

NPL 

Htvsi Communtcatron 

Station 

San Diago CA 

NZJ 

Marine Co^ps Air Station 

El Tofo CA 

WAR 

HQ Army MARS 
Radio Station 
Fort Meade MD 



4001^ kHz 

4010 kHz 

6970 kHz 

7301J kHi 

7385 kHz 

9991,5 kHz 

13927,5 kHz 

13975.5 kHz 

14385 kHz 

20066^ kHz 

21460 kHz 

7360 kHz 
14375 kHz 



7375 kHz 
14460 kHz 



CW 
LSB 
RTTY 
USB 

CW 



LSB 

CW 

CW 

LSB 

CW 

CW 

RTTY 

CW 

USB 

CW 

USB 

RTTY 
SSTV 



RTTY 
USB 



3500-3750 kHz 

7225-7300 kHz 

14080-14100 kHz 

21250*21450 kHz 

7025-7150 kHz 



3600-4000 khtz 

350O-37S0 kHz 

3500-3750 kHz 

7225-7300 kHz 

7025-7300 kHz 

10100-10150 kHz' 

14080-14100 kHz 

14000-14150 kHz 

14150-14350 kHz 

21025-21250 kHz 

21250-21450 kHz 

70ao-7tOG kHz 
14225-14235 kHz 



7080-7100 kHz 
14150-14350 kHz 



402B.5kHz LS8 3BOO-4000 kHz 

6097.5 kHz CW 7025-7150 kH2 

13992,5 kHz USB 14150-14350 kHz 

14403.5 kHz (see operating schedule b^iloM} 

20995.5 kHz USB 21250-21450 kHz 



t4403yS Operating Scehdu(« 
iniisalon Time 

mrr 1300-1500. isoo-aaoo, 0100-0245 

CW 1 500- 1800. 2200^100 



Amateur Band 
14060- 14100 kHz 
14000-14150 kHz 



T&tHef. 



35th annivefaary of communlcailon^ t^sts 
between amateur^radto operators and mi 11^ 
tary communicationa Bystema. Since 1950, 
this evem has been scheduled during the 
month of May and has emphasized a corv 
tEnuIng climate of mutual assistance and 
warm esteefit. 

Featured high tights of Itw rtationwide 
CBtiPbration are ttie traditicuKat miillary-to- 
amateuf @ossband cornmunlcalion test 
and a rn&^^age^Qo&yinQ leet. The ctobb- 
band t^t will include operations in contrn- 
IKMJS wave (CW), single sad#ttand voice 
^B}, radioteletype {RTTY), artd slow-scan 
television (SSTV). The receiving teal con* 
slsts of two special Armed Forces Day mes- 
sages from the Secretary of Dofanso, one 
transmitted using the CW mode followed 
b^ if>e second transmitted In the RTTY 
mode, 

ITieee tests give both amateur-radio op- 
sratorft and shod wave listeners {SWLs) the 
opportmity to demonatrale thedr ineU vidua! 
ledm^cal skill*, Spwdal oofmnemorattve 
acknowledo«meni {QSy cards will be 



awarded to those amateur-radio operators 
achieving a verified two-way radio contact 
with any of the participating military radio 
stations, interception of Ihaaa contacts by 
SWLs is not acknowledged by (^L cards, 
however, anyone wtio receives and accu^ 
rately oopies the Armed Forces Day CW 
andfor RTTY message from the Secretary of 
Defense can qualify to receive a special 
commemocathn certiflcatv ff^om the 
Sacrvtiiy, 

Cnwsband Contacts 

Hie mliltary-toamateur cfOsaband op^ 
eratlons will be conducted from igh3O0 
UTC to 20/0245 UTC. May. 1984. East- 
coaat stations commence operations ai 
IBM 300 UTC and west-coast stations 
commence operations at I9n600 UTC, 
May. 1984. P4llltary stations will transmit 
on selected military fraqtj#n€lea ar^l lis- 
len for amateur-radio stations on ttioae 
portions of thie amateur bands as irvdlcat^ 
ed in TalMs 1. The military operator wUI an- 
nounce the specific amateur-band fre- 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 103 



fluency bdirvg monitored. Dumtlon of 
lhea& contacts should b& lirnit«d to thr«e 
mtnutso. 

C3WllMtkln«TMt 

Tlw CW fdC«lvlno teal wLli be condut^t* 
ed a1 25 words p«r minute. The broadcast 
will be 1 sp€Cfat Atm&d Forces Pay mo^ 
sage fromi th« Secretary gf Qst^nae to any 
amateur-fadio op«ratof or snmtwave hs* 
lBfi«r desiring to participate. A lO-rrhinu1@ 
call for tuning purpo^« will begM at 
2010300 UTC, May. t0O#, Th? Sacretarv's 
mefttago win be ttansr^^ittad at 20/0310 
UTC, M«y, 1984 from tht siatlofls on the 
fraquandw \m&d \n Tabia z 

lla4ote4«f yp»wrtt«f Ric«lv1iig T«ti 

"lilt fidtoiefe typewriter receiving test 
will be trgn^mjiiod ai 60 wwtls per minuie 
using 170 Hertz (narfow) shift. A t&miriMte 
cell fbf lyritng ptjf p o eoa will begrrt at 
20/OQQS UTG, Mey^ 19B4. Ttte special Armed 
Forcea Dey mssaage f mm tite Secieitftry of 
Defame wllt b« lr«n«nilited at 20(0345 IJTC, 
May, 1964. Transinl^ttlon will lie from ttw 
same stations on the same frequQnc]<e5 as 
previously listed for ttve CW reeaivlng test^ 

Sittnlssion of Tesi E ni i ie* 

TranscTtpilans o* tt>e CW ancVor HTTY n*- 
cajving testi thoyid be sut^itted "as m 
ceived," No atlempt sliouki be macfe to cor- 
rect posstt>le trantmlsskin errors, l^ie time, 
frequency, and caltsign of the mlilta/y &ta- 
ttoft oopi«d as well as the name, cali&ign, 
and address (including zipcode)> of the irvjA- 
vidual submittinQ Itie enlry must be Ir^d^cat' 
ed on the page coniainJr>g the tesi mes- 
sage. Each year, a large r>umber of accept- \ 
&t>\e entriee are received with ins4jffjcient 
Information or 1t>e neceesary Irtfofmatlon ^s 
attaci>ed to fhe transcription and Is sepa- 
rated, IhefeOy pfecludJnQ tha IsAuanceof a 
ceftlficate. inirles must ba postmarked no 
later than May 20, 19B4, and submitted to 
the respective military oommande a& fol- 
lows: 

Stations copying AIR sand entries to: 
Armed Forces Day Test, 2045CGfDONJM, 
Andrews AFB DC 20331. 

Stations copylna NAM. I4AV, or NPQ 
send entries to: Armed Forces Day Test, 
HO Navy-Marina Corps MABS, 4401 Mas- 
sachusetts Ave. NW; Washington DC 
20390. 

Stations copying WAB send entries to: 
Armed Forces Day Test, Commander, 7th 
Signal Command, ATTN^ CCN-P1K3X, 
Fort Rllchle MD 21719. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY NJ 

The Qtouoeatef County Amateur Radio 
Clitb wiFF operate W2MM0 from 1700Z May 
4 to 1700Z May 5^ to commemorate the 
club's 251 h anniversary. Phone operation 
In lower ponlon of General-class b^ndn 
10-80. and CW In Novice banids. Com- 
memoratEve certificate by QSL to GCARC, 
PO Bok 370. Pllman NJ OaoTl. 

SUN DAY 

Tl» Florida Solar Energy Center tFSEQ 
of the State Univeialty System of Florida 
and the Irtdian Rlv«r Amate^jr Radio Clu& 
will eti«braie S^jii Day on May & and e^ 
tSOQZ to 220QZ: SJSm photovotiaic 4Hnch^ 
diametw solar cells will provide for tieaiing, 
cooling, ceoi^lng. and amateur ^adio op^a- 
tionB dtfflng this putsJk: event Sun Day. 

W4I^IJ04 will Optrvt* m SSB--7J24Q, 
14240; 21J70, and a&SlB; CW— 7.04^ 
14040, 21.040, and 2Bj00Q; and FM— 1 *&ja/ 
M. A beacon wlli be on 1296.05 MHz. 

Fof at! shortwave listeners ant} amiateur- 
radiio operators^ Tbt Sofa r C&ft^etof, a <|uar- 
terty higtHechnology newsletter, ts avail- 
able free, on raQu^st AHo^ a muitico^or <^- 
tllicaie IS availat^. Sand a business-stze 



Frequency (kKiJ 
6885.5, 13907.5 



Transmitting Station 

AIR 

2045tfi Communication Group 

Andrews Air Force Base 

Wa^ington DC 

NAM 4005.7333,14400 

Naval Commynlcatfon Area Maatar Station LAN! 
Norfolk VA 

HAV 7372^, 143883 

HQ Navy^arine Ootp$. MAf^ Station 

Cheltertham MD 

NPG 4010.7365. 13^275 

Naval Commimjcation Station 
Stockton CA 

WAR 4oaa5.en7Ai4403j 

us Army MAF^ Radio Station 
FtiflMaadeMD 




SASE tot FSEC, 300 Slate Road 401. Cape 
Ganaweral FL 32930. 

BALLOON RACE 

TTie AlamarK;^ AMateur Radio Club 
(K4EG) will tie ii^neratjr^g a spectal^ev^nt 
staiJon, May 12 and 13:. from tf>e site of trie 
Bmkjnal Hot AJr Balloon Race. Burlington, 
North Carojina. Each da/s ofkaratlon will 
be from 1100 ro 2200 IFTC. Frequencies of 
operation will be 10 kHz ir^ide the iow» 
Qanerai phone portion of 40 arid 15 meiers. 
and 7.125 kHz and 21.130 kHz in the NoMce 
t>ands. An attractive co mma mofatlve OSL 
will t>e fssued to all stations worked for a 
QSL and an SASEt OSL to: Atamarse Ama- 
teur Radio Club K4eG, PO Bm 3064, Bur 
llngton NC 2721S, 

DOGWOOD FESTIVAL 

^ajrf^efd. Connecticut The Greater Fair- 
field ARA will operate WB1 COO from 1300 
lo 22O0 UTG, May 12. during ttie annual 
Dogwood Festival A certificate is available 
for an SASE Frequencies; 3,975, 7.235, 
14.330, 21.420, Contact: Jerry C, MeJson 
KEIA, Greater Fairfield Amateur Radio As- 
sociatlon, PO Bok 1384 3Wl, Fairfield CT 
06430. 

ARMED FORCES DAY 
AT WEST POINT 

On May 12 and 13, 1964, The Meadow^ 
lands Amateur Radio Association will be 
operating at the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, New York, in honor 
of Armed Forces Day 1934. 

The club will be operating under the club 
station call N2BMN. Operation will be from 
14002 to 2000Z UTC. May 12, and from 
1400Z to 1700Z UTC, May ia Frequanclea 
will be: SSB— 14.310, 7.250, 144.225, and 
50J25 MH2, FM— 146,550 MHz. 

Send a large SASE witti $.37 US poslage 
to accommodate an 8*/i"x tl^ c^ificate 
of confirmation of Q60 to: PO Box 324, Ut- 
Ua Fefry N4.07€43. 

US AIR FORCE MUSEUM 

To celebFate tt>e diMivance of Armed 
Forces Day, tt>e United Stat^ Air Force Mu- 
seum will itx the secor>tf time. ho«t Hbci^ 
eratton ol ar^ wia^eurfadlQ apedal wen l 
station- 
To be houaecf In the Museym's WWII Nis- 
san Nut, pari Id pants will operate under tfw 
C^lSi^ KBDMZ from 140az to 22)QZ. Satuf^ 
diay, May 13l Amateur-radio opwatprs will 
work primvlly in Genera^class pfione $eg^ 
ments of 75, 40, 20, IS, and 10 meters wiiti 
petiodic excursions to t!»e Novice $i^ 
bamte. FM and SSB operation on tlw 144-, 
220-, and 4324^Kz bands is aJso planned. 
The spadfto frequaicies to be used will a& 
pend upon exiattng band condltkyts. To 
oomm^Ttorate tfie ennnt, the museum will 
issue a speciat certificate for 6acf\ tw&wa> 
contacL 



The largest arxt oldesl military aviation 
museum in ttw workl, Ihe Air Force Muse- 
um IS located sik miles rKxif^easi of Dayton 
al historic Wr^jttt-Pafterson Air Force Basei. 

BiaREDONtE 

On May 19 and 20. 1fl64, Anned Forces 
Day Weakand, riM Wt>eaton Community 
Rvllo Amateurs, Inc.. wlli cortckjct a spe- 
cial ev«nt from the Rrst tnfantry D^v-iston 
Museum, Cantfgny, in WTieaton, Illinois. 

Ute special-event call will be NOBRO. 
The 24-hour4ong event will be on all bands, 
beginning al l700Z{Grhn> May 1@, 19S4. Fre^ 
qmncias win be 50 kfi2 up tn^m the tx^tom 
of tr% General phor»e bands. 25 kHz up from 
the bottom of the General CW bands, aiKl 
25 kHz up from the tjottom o< the Novice 
bands. RTTV on i4a.70 simpler. 14.087, and 
21.007* 2 meters on t47.54 slmpieK, Cer* 
llficate via WCRA. PO Box QSU Wheaton IL 
60189. $1 or 5 1RC«, 

ARMED FORCES DAY 

In recognition of the 3Sth annual Armed 
Forces Day celebration^ amateur-radio 
3 tat ion W40DR, located aboard Naval Air 
Station Memphia, Mil llngton. Tennessee, 
will be operating on Saturday, May 19, from 
140G£ to 2200Z. Plana call for operation on 
7,230 ^±10 kHz). CW frequency will tie 
21.145. 146,52 will be the 2m frequency. It la 
hoped that operation will be continuous on 
all bands, but check all frequencies to be 
sure. Special certificates and OSL cards 
will be available to those who work W40DR. 
OSL to amateur-radio station W40DR. PO 
Box 54276, Mlllington TN 36054 A brief d& 
script ion of the Navy Memphis complex fol- 
lows^ 

The 3,400^aere Navy Memphis complex is 
located 13 miles north of Memphis, Tennes- 
aee, and five mlleA east of lt>e Mississippi 
River. NAS Mempnts Is the home of tihe 
Chief of Naval Technical Trainlrkg 
ICNTECHTRA) and the Naval Air Teclinical 
Training Center (NATTCV 

CNTECHTRA administers the technfcal 
timining program for the entire US Navy, 
Training conducted ufKJer the auspices of 
CNTECHTRA begins with the basic training 
for aM Navy recrulte and officer candidates^ 
It continuee tfiroiior» vArkaus levola of 
tecfinieal sldlla training and inciude» irv 
stnjction tor the tiighly acfvanced tec^nl- 
done wtio maJntaln amt operate the ex- 
tfwn«ly tecfinJ'eal and sensttfw devices 
found on the Navy^s aircrBfl, sMpA, and 
subrnarlne& 

Ov«r 3gDQQ Navy coiirtos of incirustion 
are conducted thfoughout If^ command's 
network of 58 schooftiousas. kscated at 27 
differertt installations, stret^Jng from the 
aaat coast to ifia west coast, the Great 
Lakes to Itw Gulf of Mexico, artd across the 
Padfk: to HawalU Tha ooordi nation, super- 
vlB^on, planning r^^areh. and guidance for 
ftwse courses take placa at tht Millingtofv 
bafted tiaadquarter&. 



NATTC is the largest Single command in 
the Navy Memphis complex with over 40 
different courses of Instruction. It stands 
aqme 10,000 strong, Including students. Irv 
structors, and support personr^el. The train- 
ing canter's mission Is to train selected 
Navy and Marine aviailon personnel In 
aeronautical technical phases of naval avi- 
ation and other related subjects as directed 
by the Chief of Naval Oparatlona. 

PORTSMOUTH SEAWALL 
FESTIVAL 

Portsmouth, Virginia: Tha Portsmouth 
ARC will operate W4POX at \ha Portsmouth 
Seawall F^tival at Porlskle. May 26, 27, 
and 2fi. 1500-220QZL Frequencies will be 
around 7230 and 14.290 MHzl For special 
commiemprative QSL^ send your card and 
SASE toe W4P0X. PO Box 6503, Pwtsmoijfti 
VA 23703. For OSL and a large commemo- 
rative certifi^te. send youf card and a 
9"xl2" enfvelope wiitt two units of first- 
class poetagSL 

W1N0 WEEKEND 

The Wireless trstitute of Nqrtfiam Ohio 
(WiNOjv an organizaiion sponsored by the 
Lake County Amateur Radia A^sociatioa 
will be on the air with a specia l aw e nt sta- 
tion to ccmmemorate Otiio Wine Weak on 
Saturday, June Z and aj^n on Svnday, 
JuTke 3, On Saturday evening we will tie op^ 
erating tretween 7 aru) 1 1 pm EOST (2300Z 
June 2 to 0300Z June 3f on 3910 MHz and 
7236 MHz, On Sunday afternoon we will be 
on tieFtween 1 1 am arut 4 pm EDST I16O0Z lo 
2000Z) on 7235 MH^ and 21360 MHz: Tl>e 
Station will be located at an actual winery in 
Madl&on, Ohio, and will use the call KOOO. 
A special BW by 1 r QSL certificate will be 
available from: KOBO— WIND Weekend, 
7126 Anii^omr Drive, Mentor OH 44060, for a 
lege I -sized SASE 

FAR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Foundation for Amateur Radio, Inc., 
a nonprofit organization with head(3|uarters 
In Washington D€, plans lo award 15 SChoU 
arshlps for the academic year 1964-85. The 
foundation, composed of fifty localarea 
amateur-radid clubs, fully funds two of 
these scholarships from the proceeds of Its 
annual hamfest. It administers, without 
cost to the donors, three scholarships for 
the Quarter Century Wireless Association, 
two for Ihe Dade (FL) Radio Club and one 
each for the Radio Club of America, tfw 
Richard G. Chichester Memorial, the Young 
Ladies' Radio League, the Edmund B. Red- 
ington Memorial, the Amateur Radio Newi 
SfflT/ice, the Columbia (MDJ Amateur Radio 
Association, the Baltimore (MD] Amateur 
Radio Club, and the Lewis G. Wilkinson 
Memorial. 

Licensed radio amateurs may compete 
for one or more of tftese awards if ttiey plan 
to pursue a fulf^ime course of studies tse- 
yond high school and ons enrolled or fieve 
been accepted for enrollrnent In an accred- 
ited university, coliege* Of technical sdmol. 
Most of tfie scholtfaliif» require the appli^ 
cant to hoki at least an FCC Generafclass 
li««h$e or equival«iL The sdiOlar^hip 
awards rar^ge from S3S0 to 1900 with pref er* 
ence given in some casas to resldants of 
specified geographicaf are«s or Ifie purmilt 
of certam study gmgmttA^ 

AdtSEional mformatkm and an applica- 
tion form can be requoitotf tPy • Nrtter or 
<^Upostcard, poatmaik«d pttor to May 31, 
19B4, from: FAR Scholarships, 6803 Rhode 
Island Avenue, Cotlega Park MD 20740. 

Tfie fofjndatRxi Is devc^ed eiecfutfvely to 
pramoting the interests of amalaur radio 
and to those scientific, literary, and educa- 
tkxuf pursuits tfisl sd^^nce the pu/poaaa 
of the Amateur Radio Service. 



104 73 Magazine * May. 1934 



MICROCOMPUTER 
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•TWO CW 30 MESSAGES 'RECONFIGURABLE- 



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Shortened dtpoltf 






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33 95 


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73 Magazine • May, 1^84 105 



COHTESTS 



Robert Baker W&2GFE 
16 Windsor Or, 
Atco NJ 08004 



LATESPRir4GQRPSSB 

ACTlVmr WEEKEND 

May 5-6 

THts b OAg of several QHP activity weef;- 
efids he^d throughout 1994 Ijy X\w GORP- 
Club of England. The events are intervded to 
promote OHP activity at the tlrrtea and on the 
frequencies suggested, Members from other 
ORP clubs throughout the world and alt arrir 
ateurs interested in QRP ane invited to jojn in 
at the foliowtr>g times and frequencies: 

Times (GMT) Frsciueficlee 



0900-1000 


14265 


1000-1100 


213aS2S68S 


110O-120O 


7090 


1^00-1300 


3680 


1300-1400 


14285 


1400-1600 


3680 


1500-1730 


21386/28635 


1730-2000 


14286 


2000-2100 


7090 


2100-2200 


35G0 


2200-2300 


14286 



Remember this Is an SSB activEty and 
many of the suggested frequencies are out^ 
side the USA bands. 

FLORIDA QSO PARTY 
1400 to 19O0 GMT May 5 
0001 to 0500 GMT May 6 
1500 to 2300 GMT May 6 

This is the 18th annual Florida QSO Party 
apoosored by ffof ida Skip. All amaleuns 
worldwide are eliglbte and Invited to partici- 
pata All amateur bands may be used, 160 
through 2 meters. Ail statlofhS vi\{\ separate 
phone and CW logs; phone and CW are sep- 
arate contests. A station may be worthed 
once on each band oo each mode. Neither 
crossbafid rKsr crossmode contacts will 
ooiinit for contest credit. Florida stations may 
work other Florida stations, but for contest 
points only. Out-of-state stations may not 
wort; each other for contest credit. Contacts 
made on repeaters do not count for credit. 

Flofida stations will be divided into two 
classes. Class A stations are those operat- 



ing portable or mobife on emergency power 
and running 100 Watts or less output imide 
Forlda bot outside of their horrw oo4jntte$. 
Class-B stations are all other stations operat- 
ing in Florida. Entrants may be single- 
operator or multlo[>Bfator and this must be 
indicated on th& summary sheet. 

Each entrant agrees to be bound by the 
proviSEons of the contest annourkcement, the 
regulations of the applicable lEcensing au- 
thorityi and the decisions of the fhri^a Skip 
Contest Committee, which are final. 

EXOHAHQB 

Rorida stations send RS(T1 and county of 
operation. Ottiers sefid RSO) and US state, 
Canadian province, or country. 

Phone— 3945, 7279, 14279, 21379, 28679, 
50,2, 146.52. 
CW^3555, 7055. 14055. 21056, 2806& 

SCOmHG: 

Rorida stations count one pofnt per QSO 
with out-of-state or other Florida stations. 
MuitipEier is the sum of states (49 max.), prov- 
inces (12 maxj, and DX countries (2? max.) 
actually worked; rnaximum multipiler i$ 88. 
Others count 2 points per QSO with each 
Florida station. Multiplier is the number of 
different Florida countries worked {67 max.). 
Final score is the product of QSO pdnts and 
the mujtiplier. Cla&&-A stations of^t^, multiply 
score by 1.5 to obtain final total. 

A\NARDS: 

Certificates for phone and CW to tfie top 
single-operator score in each staiCn province^ 
DX country, ar>d Florida county. Multioper- 
ator winners wili receive certificates as activ- 
ity justifi^. There are also 5 plaques to be 
awarded as toilows: high single operator in 
Florida and out of statCf CW arxl phone, and 
the Florida club with tfw highest aggregate 
score. A minimum of 25 contacts must be 
made to be eligible for a oeftificate. 

Phone and CW entries are to be sepa- 



May5-e 


\LENDAR 

Lata Spring QFIP SSB Activity Weekend 


May5-£ 


Florida QSO Party 


May 19-21 


Mkhtgan QSO P«rty 


Jun 9-10 


ARRL VHP QSO Party 


June 23-24 


ARI^ Field Day 


Jul 13-1$ 


45 Irrterfiational SSTV DX Contest 


Aug4-S 


ARRLUHFCo«ite3t 


Aug 11-12 


New Jefsey QSO Party 


Aug1&-ia 


SARTG Woftehvtde ^TVf Contest 


Aug £4-27 


AS NcMth American UHF FSTV DX Contest 


S«pS-9 


ARRLVHF QSO Party 


Sep 15-17 


WasTiington State QSO Party 


Sep 22-23 


Late Summer QRP CW Activity WeeKeivd 


Oct 6-7 


ARRLOSO Party- CW 


OCI13-14 


ARRL QSO Party- PtKHie 


N<Ptf3-4 


ARRL Sweepstakes— CW 


Nov 17-ia 


ARRL Sweepstakes— Ption« 


Dec 1-2 


ARRL 160-Meter Contest 


Dwa-g 


ARRL lO-Meter Contest 


Dae26-j«iii 


QRP Winter Sports— CW 



r&tB^i Along with legible logs In chronolog- 
ical order, a summary sheet is required with 
each entry. The summary sheet must contain 
score, number of QSOs, multiplier, statbn 
call sign, entry class, number of Florida ooun- 
tlee, power source (for CI ass-A entries)^ coun- 
ty, state, province, country, of regilon of 
operation, calisEgns of aJI operators/loggers 
if multi-op^ name of club ft part of a ciub ag- 
gregate score, narne and address fyped of 
prmt&i h bhck letters^ and a sigr>ed deciara- 
tion that ail njies and regulatior>s have been 
observed. All stations making mrore than 200 
Q€;Os must also include a dupe sheet. Sarrv 
pie summary and log sfiaets are available for 
an SASE from the QfTH below. 

At the discretion of the contest commlt- 
le^^ stations and/or opefators may be dis- 
tiualified for improper reporting, excessive 
dupeSr errors in multiplier Hsts, unreadable 
logs, ot)vious cheating* etc. Ail entries must 
be received on or before Jurie Z. Mait ail an- 
tries to: Fiorfda Skip Contest Committee, c/o 
Fiorlda Arriateur Radio Society, PO Box 9673, 
Jacksonville PL 32208. 



MICHIGAN QSO PARTY 
laOQ GMT May 19 to 

0300 GMT May 20 
1100 GMT May 20 to 

0200 GMT May 21 

Ttils years QSO party will be sponsored by 
the Oak Park ARC. Phorve and GW are com- 
bir^ into one contest. Michigan stations 
can work Michigani counties for multipliers. 
A station may be contacled onoe on each 
band/Vnode, Portables/mobiles may tte 
counted as new contacts each time they 
change counties. 

B)iChANGE: 

RS(T), QSO number, QTH as state, ooun- 
ttVp or h/lichigan county. 

FREOUENCtES: 

Phone— 1615, 3006, 7280, 14280. 21380, 
23560. 

CW-1810, 3640, 3725, 7(B5, 7125, 14035, 
21035,21125,28035, 2B126. 

VHF^50.135i 145.025, 146.5Z 



REmTS 

SARTG WORLDWIDE 
RTTY CONTEST 1983 

Glass A— Single Operator 

1. ON4Ulsr 567,000 

2. LTTBRP 307,230 

3. SM6ASD 263,885 

4. DKBNG 249,165 

5. HB9HK 22O.950 

Ciaas B— Multi-Operator 

1. OHOTTY 344,960 

2. OH2T] 219,550 

3. OH 2 AH 70,750 

4. 0K3KGI 44,390 

5. HA3KHB 6,555 





Class C- 


-SWL 




1, 


OZ-DR2135 




270,500 


2. 


y2-28l4/M 




123,370 


3. 


OKI -23186 




105,560 


4- 


NL'44a3 




86,790 


5. 


FE-3700 




68,735 



Top Americans 
10. KA3GIK 116,250 

12, W4CQI 105,600 

13. KB2V0 105,525 

19, K6WZ 44,490 

20. W&4VBD 44,200 

Top American SWL 
7. J. Mathews 41,650 



SCORWG," 

Multipliers are counted only once. Mich- 
igan stations score 1 point per phorte QSO 
and myitipiy by the total number of state$, 
ooyntries, and Mict>lgan ixsunties. Each CW 
contact counts 2 points; KL7 and KH6 count 
as states; VE counts as a countiv^ Maxfn-tum 
muitipHer lsS5. 

Others, take QSO points tiroes tiie total 
number of Michigan counties. QSO points 
a/e 1 potnt per phone QSO, 2 points per CW 
QSO, and 5 points for each club-station con- 
tact with WBfyflB, Maximum multiplier is 83. 

VHF only entries: same as above except 
multipliers per VHP band are added together 




U THE LCARA PATCH U 

NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

THE LCARA PATCH is another fine example of the outstanding newsletters 
being produced every month by ham organizations around the world. Featuring 
club news and meeting minutes, excerpts from The W^stflnk Report and the 
WdYl Report, DX and FCC news, and much more, the February Issue (for exarrh 
pie} contained 40 different articles. Congratulations, Editor Gary Knelsfey 
KC&QN] 

To enter your club's newsletter In 73's Newslettsf of the Month Contest, send 
It to 73, Pine Street, Peterborough NH 034S8. Attn: Newsletter of the Month. 



106 73 Magaiine • May, 19S4 



tor totaJ muJtlpiier. No repealer contacts are 
allows 



to Michigan antrfes witti fiidh 
EtHjltloperatof^ngfa-lfaismitter score, high 
Mk^higan acora, h^jh MIcMgon {Upper Penirv 
ajia} scora, titgli aggragale dub score^ hi^v 
VHF only (lOO OSOi minimumi, rtigt\ mobile, 
and tii^ oul of state. Certricates to hi{^ 
score in eac^ oounty with a mtnimum of 50 
QGO& Oui-of^ata certitrcates for high soora 
In eadi state and country. 

A tog and aummary sheet are requested 



lowing the scoring and other pertinent In- 
formatioa nama a^ addraas In black ietttirs, 
and a aspect declaratlor) that all rules and 
regulatioTtt have beert observed. MICI1I9M1 
staikins Indude dub name for oombifiacl 
cJyh ^core. Party cicjntacis do no* Count tc^ 
wartt the Michigan Achievi^n^it Award i^> 
less one faa aboui Michigan is cofmnunj^ 
cated Members ot ttie Mk^ilgan Week QSO 
Party Committee are not eiigO^ie for ^rKBvtd- 
ual awards. Decislor^ of ttie Coritest Com- 
fTtttee are fir\aJ. Results iirill be final oft July 
30th and will be maited to all entries. Mailing 
dtadttne Is iune 30. Entries should be sent 
t« l/Ml ahaw KfiED, 3810 Wooctnan. Trof 



MICHIGAN ACHIEVEMENT 
AWARD 

This will be the 2&tfi yea/ that hams have 
had Ihecr own pTDgfam to puti^icize Micli^ian 
and Its products Just as for the paat y/mm% 
the govorrxx wtIP award Ad^fev^nant Certlin- 
cates to hanr^ wno take pMt in teitirtg the 
world of Michigan's imiifnited resources, op- 
pon unities, and advantages. Certificates am 
PMWtfod on the following bases: 

1. A Michigan ham subvnits log informa^ 
lioi% and names ar«l adctBSses r^' possitrioi of 
15 or more contacts made to out-ol-state or 
DX hamA with InHonnation regardirig Mich- 
Igwi 



2. An ixrt-of'State ham, including Canada, 
aubmlta log information and names and ad- 
lAoiaea (if possible) of at least 5 Michioan 
hams who relate facts to him about Mich- 
igaa 

3. A foretgn ham^ exducfirtg any reskjerit of 
Canada, submits ttie cati letters a^ name 
and address plus log ir^oimaiion for at least 
one Michigan ham wtu has told him about 
Mict)igaa 

Onty C^Os made during Michigan Woiit, 
May 19-26. will beconsidar«] valNl All 9^1- 
cattorm (or certificate miist be postma/^ed 
by Judy 1 and mailed to: Oo^^mor James 
eianc^anl Lar^ng Ml 48902. 



mi 



21 Smater readings are purely ^ 

3) "RushbOJ?'' was the name given to a rtfl 
wUh a receiver. 

4) Of, Cart Z^nar Invented the * 



John Edwards KJ2U 

PO Box 73 

Middle Vlfiage NY 11379 

INTO THE ARCHIVES 

The ottier day, while rummaging throijgh 
the KI2U archives, \ cam« across a facsinv 
lie of an AARL membership application, cir- 
ca 1914. Did you Kncfw that one had to apply 
for AflRL membership bacK In the o4d days? 
S11DW3 yot4 how stanibudA have dropped 
These fteySn the AfiRL even accepts people 
like me and AF2M. 

At any rate, I thought it might be f i^ to ETII 
in ihe application and send il back to tt>e 
league along wiih my renewal checic Here- 
wtlh, the Af^RL's questions and my m- 
sponses: 

Yout n&me: Ah. an easy question. J. J, 
Edwards. 

AdHres^: ArKolher easy one. PO Box 73, 
Middie Village NY 1 1379. My OTH is a little 
cramped, but the address has a nice rir>g to 
it. 

Yoof age: Vm rwgjnning to get touchy 
about questions like this. Tvranty-ntne, 
Really! 

Your stario/t caff fatwrs; KI2U- Hope they 
don't wlod the numtjer. 

length of yovr aerial? Which one? Let's 
see, the tx>om on my HF baam is atxiut 1^ 
feel lorig. 

Do yew obtafa four power from batt^ri&s 
or cify currmil? It depends. My HT yses bat- 
terles, 

Oo you use a sf>ar*s cofi or transformer? 
Strange {^uestiort. Mosi of rny power sup- 
plies have tmnsfonners. I thknK. 

Wfmt 1$ yoiif ^fifimximate recemng 
rsngt in mifas'^ Hmmm. I dklnt get to hes* 
W5LFU but t have worthed EME. Let's say 
500,000 mi 1^1. give Or taKe a few hundred 
tllOtisaryL 

Are you tmutftn by int^ffer&yce? Yoa 
bet. My App4e generales a torrent ol RR 

NeKt du^tiof^- 

Have yov wepih^ne c^inection in your 
house, or cortwrif^nt? In my house^ no! my 
convenierit. 

00 you k6»p your staUon practicaffy coth 
stantfy in running orders Yee. my station is 
practically running. 

Here's hopirng my answers; help make a 
belter ARRL 



ELEMENT 1 
MULTIPLE CHOICE 

1) In a folded dipole: 
1) Current In all conductors am ih 

phase 
% {Current in all c^jnductort are Out Of 

phase 



31 Curreni exists only in the diolecf ric 
4) Height Is rarely Important 
2J A quarter-wave iransforn^r is: 

1) A qualify detector 

2) A^so Known as a ''O" section 

3) May be used as an inductance 
transformer 

4} Used ortly with coaxial feedline 
3} A f i^hbohi ia a; 

1| E»pQi« 

2) Trav<»ltng-wave antenna 

31 Helical antenr^ 

4} Type ot reoftNar 
4} TTie antenna used by Marconi to receive 

the frrsi transatlantic radio signals was 

field alott by a: 

1^ Balloon 

2) Build^r>o 

3^ Man 

4) Kite 

5) A "capacitance hat" is most ohen used 
ow 

1} Cubical quads 
2) Yagis 
3} Dipoles 
4) Whip antennas 

ELEMENT 2 
TRUE- FALSE 



True Fal*fl 



1) Ail Apple lis come 
equipp^ with a ZBO mi* 
croprocessor. 

2J CP/M was the first micro- 
computer iar^guaga 

^ That fellow in the IBM 
Person^ Computer ads 
Is suppoMd to be Chaf- 
lieChvp^ 

4) The Zaa ZSOA, and ZBOH 
micrapfDcessore are all 
msdit by Zi Iodine 

^ TT% 6602 is miade by 
Intel. 

^ The floppy disk was 
invented by IBM. 

7\ V^stCaic is an fntegraied 
software package. 

8) A "mouse" la computer 
slang for a programming 
error. 

9) The term "byte" is a con- 
traction of the words "bi- 
nary*' and "dlgit.^* 

10) FORTRAN Is a bualnese- 
oriented language. 



ELEMENT 3 
RLL IN THE BLANK 

1) Most sotld-state C^asa C amplifiers 
operated with both base and ^^^ 
leads connected to ground 



B) CMOS: complementary-symmetrv, met- 
al-oxide . 

ELEMENT 4 
SCRAMBLED WORDS 

Unscramble these words dealing with 
packet radio, 

lantermi dcen drrehawa 

erawtost verscctrina lolp 

ShandhRes rr>earf gllpdaerte 
coprolto 



THE ANSWERS 

EMfTtenf I: 

1—1. 2—2. 3—2, 4—4, 5-4. 

1 — False A 6602, Of course, you can al- 
ways buy a ZaO co-processor 
tioaitl. 

2— False CP/M is an operating system, 
not a languaga 

S— False IBM says it's rK>t Charlie, but 
"Everyman." Could have tod^ed 
me. 

4— True Eight-bit favorites. 

5— False By Motorola. A name that's 
somewhat famrllar to hams. 

Ci^True Who else? 

7^False It^s }usl a plalnp old, eiectfonic 
spreadsheet. 



6— False It's an input device—like a key- 
board or ioystiok. 

9— False But '"bit" is. 
10— False FORTRAN is a language airrved 
at scientific applications. CO^ 
BOL is for buSFness. 

Bfamanf 3: 

1 — emitter 

2— relative 

3— superregenerat ive 

4— zener diode 

S— silicon 

Etement 4: 

terminal, node, tiardware: software^ trans- 
ceiver^ poll; handshake, firame. digi peeler; 
protocol. 



SCORING 

Etem&it J: 

Rve points for each correct answer, 

EiBm^nt 2r 

Two and on&half points lor eac^ corract 

answer 

Etmnent 5: 

Frve pomts for each correct fllWa 

Eioment 4: 

Two points lor each word corrddly ufV 

scrambled. 

So, how did you do? 

1-20 points— Poor 
21^0 points— Fair 
41 -eo points— Good 
61-00 points— Better 
81-100+ points— Bingo [ 



MM HELP 



I am looking for any amateur-radioH^ 
lated programs for tt^ Timex/Sinciair 
tOOO computer. I also need a schematic 
for a Hailicrafter? Corrvnander Thirty-Two 
UHF high-band trartsceiver, 

Soo«t Harvey KA7FW 

N. 5011 l4ahQRd. 
Hewman Laite WA 9902:5 

fn August, we are spending our third hioli- 
day in your wonderful country. As we have 
done tjefore, we are requesting a couple of 
nights Of hospitality in New Yonk. This is 
our first vJsIt 10 the city, but we have made 
good friends In Washington and 1^ through 
this unorthodox method. Hospitality will of 
course be reciprocated In our home^ which 
is convenient for Scotland and Hadrian's 
Wall and on a direct route to LorxJon. 

We are In our late thirties and very easy 
to get on with. We happen to prefer meeting 
people informaHy to staying En impersonal 
hotels. 

Michael Is a licartsed ham, a computer 
engineer, and a soafir>g instructor. I am a 
final-year student rkung sociai work. We 



Iowa cats and ha^ no feed^r^ pfDt>iems or 
peculiarities. In fact we aiB a thoroughly 
nice coypie. All Eetters will be replied ta 

Fat and Michael Stott 

*^ellvl«iir 

12 Caste Vle« 

Ovinghim 

NE42eAT 

Englind 

066132020 



Wanted; manual or any Information on 
a WROl transmitter/receiver, 

Tommy Norrit KA4RKT 
Rte. #1, Box 412 

Auburn KY 42206 

I hear that the Standard SI^-C146A 
hand-held can be modified from two to 
four Watts output via a circuit modlflca^ 
lion. Anyone having information to this ef- 
fect, please advise. 

Ted Allen WE3CVN 

It Penahh Road 

Eala-Cynwyd PA 18004 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 107 



W2NSD/1 

KEVER SAY DIE 

ec//tor/a/ by Wmyne Green 



from page 6 

have to have some system for 
getting Novices to keep on mov- 
ing thek code speed up until ^t 
reaches at least 35 per. It means 
making sure thai we don*t let a 
few lazy hams reflect badly on 
all of us by letting their code 
speed slip Just because they 
spend most of their hamming 
time rag-chewing on phone or 
working RTTY. None of us wants 
to see that happen, fight? 

One p>ossible way to help atl 
of us keep our code speed up, 
even if we do spend a good deal 
of time on phone, might t>e to re- 
quire all operators to exchange 
cailsigns only on CW, even for 
phone contacts. After all, RTTY 
operators for many years had to 



send their calls on CW before 
and after ^ch transmission. We 
could go further and make it ille- 
gal to give your cail on voice. I*d 
like to see someone put that into 
a petition and send it to the FCC 
as part of the obviously needed 
beefing*up of code. 

You know, if we don 1 outlaw 
repeating the callsign on voice, 
we could see many ops putting 
the CW identification on a ROM 
chip at 100 wpm, operated by 
the mike button. Could we even 
outlaw the use of computers to 
decipher the callstgns sent on 
CW? Why not? 

The more we encourage ama- 
teurs to use computers and 
code keytKMfds, the more likely 
we are lo have amateurs getting 



lazy atx>ut their code speed. 
Also, if any of the FEMA or CD 
crowd get a taste of high-speed 
digital communications, we're 
going to have a hard time get- 
ting them to let us use Morse 
code for emergencies. Best we 
do what we can to discourage 
RTTY, ASCII, packet radio, and 
other systems which do not de- 
pend entirely on the code skills 
of licensed amateurs. We sure 
don't want any unlicensed oper- 
ators putting us out of work in 
emergencies — not even after 
WTGAD. 

Computers and keyboards 
are pernicious things, automat- 
ing communications and taking 
it out of the hands of us, er, 
amateurs. The ARRL has been 
fighting RTTY for the last thirty 
years— obviously going along 
with the main line of amateur 
convictions. 

Okay, what sttould we do 
next? I've already proposed a lit- 
tle rule change to the FCC which 
I feel is necessary if we are go- 
ing to make sure that norm of 
the old-timer hams lets his code 
speed slip. Perhaps the next 



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step is to get a bit more spec- 
trum for CW communications. 
Wouldn't It be greai If w© could 
put the 40Tn band back the way it 
was 50 years ago? That used to 
be strictly a CW band In those 
days. And you didn't hear any 
foreign broadcast stations 
there^ either. It wasn't until we 
opened 40m to phone eommuni- 
calions that they were able to 
creep in. Now they've just about 
squeezed amateurs out of our 
phone band. If we go baci< to 
CW, we might be able to push 
those bums out. So let's see 
some proposed 40m changes, 
eh? Let's get phone out of 
there— and perhaps RTTY also. 

40m used to be the truly great 
ham band of the world. There 
used to be more ham ac- 
tivity—and that was 100% good 
old hones! CW; chum— than on 
any otf^er ham band. Jt was 
packed solid with CW ops 50 
years ago— and can be again. 
Ask any old-timer about It. 

You knoWf I think 40m tiegan 
to go downhill a bit when they irh 
vented the vfo. You youngsters 
don't know the excitement of 
plugging in a crystal, firing up 
your rig, calling a long CQ, and 
then tuning the entire 300 kHz 
of the band for a call. None of 
this slam-bam stuff. None of 
these Shree-by-three calls. If you 
wanted to get someone, you 
called CQ for three to five 
minutes. And when you were 
calling someone, you called 
them for several minutes so they 
could tune up the band and find 
you, often checking hundreds of 
signals as they tuned. Doesn't 
that sound worlds better than 
sending a quick CQ and check- 
ing your frequency? You bet? Do 
you think we could bring back 
crystals and junk all these con- 
founded synthesizers we've 
been forced to buy? 

tf they took all that crap out of 
our rigs, they could get the price 
down more where it ought to be. 
1 remember when you could buy 
a nice ham receiver for $29.50 — 
the good old Haliicrafters Sky 
Buddy. By the time they've put in 
ten or fifteen bands, synthesis, 
sideband generators, and de- 
modulators^ is It any wonder 
some of these rigs cost over 
$500? We don't need all that 
stuff tor CW, so iet'S get rid of it. 

Hey, Pll be looking for you on 
40m just as soon as 1 find where 
1 put my key, okay? it's around 
here somewhere— 1 saw it a cou- 
ple of years ago. 



10a 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



NEW PRODUCTS J 



EXLSOOO DIGITAL 
COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL 

Amaleur-Whotesare Electronics has Itv 
troduced J he r^olutlooary EXL-5O0O dlgl- 
ta'l commiinicattQns termtrval. 

The EXL-5OO0 features a buiIMn lilgti- 
rftaolytion lofigfiefgiitefx^ Of**" mort' 
tqr lot sharp, c^&ar images wttfi no jiagle 
or jjttiif e¥a>n under ttuor^cafit ligfitJng, 
AiAQ fealiired ar& an e^ti^nai ptug-in key- 
board ami a versatile buitt-tn power supply 
for 117/234 V ac or 13B V dc. Operation (s 
by front' panel push-button controls, 

Thm EXbSOOO includes capability for 
oporallng in the new AMTOFl modes A, B, 
and L A high-speed demodulator allows 
Baudot and ASCII operation from 12 to 
600 baud at TTL level, In Increments of O.T 
baud. Tbe domoduletor will work with hiflhi 
ot low tones. For transmitting, AFSK of 
FSK keying can be u3«d, Morse sending 
and feceiving speed \% adjvslabfe from 5 
to 100 wpm In i-wpm steps, witfi receive 
auto^tracking and variable trar^mittrng 
weighi. 

A IpaSO-cfiaracier dispray memoiy Is, 
apitt Into two i^ges ot 4D characters by 16 
1 1 nea. Seven I ndepende n 1 1 y -pf og ra mme- 
bl« 72-character channels and eight in- 
dope ndon t iy-program m a bl e 24-c haracter 
channels allow storage of messages for 
permanent use. The memories can i>e pre- 
loaded and reprogrammed. Errors axe 
easily corrected. The program mable 
iTiamoriss are backed up by an internal 
baltery so that they are m^r tost 

OHiet features of the EX 1 5000 i^nciude: 
ftill coniroi, fuftctlon display, split-screen 
operallo«i, automatic send/receive swi Idl- 
ing^ automatic carriaige refufn arKJ lifie 
feed, automatic letters-code inseftf04i« 
word-mods and line-modfi operation, word 
wraparound, simultaneous sand-receive 
capatjility^ selective calling, automatic 
timer-controlled transmission. RY and 
"qutcK-brown-fox'' test signals, automatic 
ID, random-character generator for code 
practice, a printer intertace, provision for 
an eKtemai monitor, a butlt-in audio moni- 
tor, a barngrapti LED tunlrvg meter* noise- 
reductton receiving crrcuil. time dock, 
and much noore. 

Further mforrrtation about tfie EXL-5000 
may be obtained from Amat^uf-Whoie- 
s^ie EltfcifVftics. ff}C.,8$f7SM. I29tfi Tef- 
f^ee. Miamf ft 33176: (3(^^233^3637. 
Reader Service number 479, 

MODEL S1QSA SMART PATCH 

A new simplex autopaich will work on 
any amateur or commercial simplex radio 
and is easy to Ir^talL CES engin^«rs have 
raiie»(oned ihe VOX^nhancemefit circuit- 
ry and moblle^res&nce <fetectors in ihe 
Model 51(^A Smart Patch. Tfw improvfr 
ments allow tr>e advanced microcomputef 
in the Smart Patch to keep the user frotn 
missing words or Infomvatiofi^ Tfw Sm^t 
Patch gives the mobile complete ar^ Im^ 
mediate full break-in capability without 
losing Infofmation. The Immediate con* 
trol feature allows operation in the ama- 
teur servFce because Smart Patch cannot 
transmit on top of another mobile. Trans- 
missiont can be temienated by an operator 
simply keying his transmitter. Installation 
consists of oonneciirvg RX audio. TX au- 
dio, FIT, aTKf power. For more *fif Ofmation 
about th« Smart Patch, contact Commuah 
catJoffi f tecf/wi/cs Spodattms, tnc^ PO 
Ban 2930. Wmrer Par* ft 32?90; (B0Q}^27- 
SIS56. Reader Service number 477. 



NEW HT AMPLIFIERS 

Mirage Communlcallons has recently 
announced the addition of two new low- 
profile HT amplifiers to Iheir sjcpanding 
line of American-made communications 
equipment 

The B23A n44-14S MHil and C22A 
{220-225 MHz) InoOfporate features that 
typkiaJJy are only evailable on larger , more 
expensive amptiflers into a slfrrt-lirve, low* 
pfohie package fof HT use. Both ampli- 
fiers feature a tniilNn receiire preamp that 
delivers a 1,5- 20^6 noise figure. aia-mocJe 
operation ^CW, FM, or SSBK and automat- 
ic antenna changeover. 

The rf power Input range, from 100 mW 
to 5 WattSp and high rf power output 
(B23A, 2 W in^ W out; C22A, 2 W In/30 W 
out) make them ideal for u^e with low- 
power transmitters. 

The B23A and C22A are backed by a 
5-yeflr factory warranty (1 yeof on rt power 
tranalsters} and a wottdw^tle sales net- 
wOrKj 

For more informal ion, contact your 
nearest ciealer or write to Everett L 
Grscey, Mirage Communications, PO Box 
JOaO, Morgan HiU CA 95037; {4QSh7^ 
7363. 

IC-02A0) HAND-HELD 

loom has announced the 1C-02A and the 
1C432AT iwo-meier hamwwids. These com- 




The icom iC'02AT h^rnfftM. 

pact mutti-featuracf hancf-heids am tr^ 
same size as the I02A series but have fea- 
tures found on no other amateur hand-fveld- 
The IC-02A am^ IC-02AT are designed to 
be compatible with all eKisting IC-2A ac- 
cessories plus some new accessories. An 
important feature of ttte tO'02A series Is 




Low-prof fl9 HT amplfthr from Wrags. 




,^piex A"^-^^ 



The 



State ot t*^e 



C« 



The Modtef 5T0SA Smart Pmfct from CES. 



thel 11 has 32 PL f ones boiit into Ihe unit as 
atandaird. These tones are programmable 
from tlie front-panel pad and rrvay be used 
w^th any frequency at any lime. 

Any frequency on i-kHj spacing in the 
tw04tieter ham t>and may tw caiied up In 
the tC4J2A. All frequency entries as well 
as control functions for memory, scan* 
ning. etc., are selected by the iS-button 
pad on the face of the radio. Included are 
priority watch, scanning of both mem- 
ories and programmable band scan, and 
DTMF on the JC-02AT model. The unit fea- 
tures 10 memories which store frequency, 
PL lonot olfsei and offset direction^ ar)d 
an Internal lithium battery tieckup. Ttie 
priority channel Is a unique feature lo tfie 
IC02A and iG<J£AT, as well as the custom 
LCD readout with an S-meter function. 

The i&02A series will run at 3 Watts 
with the standa/d BP3- battery pack^ or at 5 
Watts with an optional high-power battery 
pack. A long life battery, 8.4 vgtts at 300 
mA, will be available to double the work- 
ing time o* the standard 3- Watt-out put 
unit- Batteries may be charged a variety of 
ways. 

The i&02A series has an environmen- 
tal ly-s«a led case with Oring seats to pro- 
tect it against dirt and moisture. A heavy- 
duty aluminum back provides heat sink- 
ing for the 5 Watts of power. 

A |>ower conrvector Is supply on the 
lofi of the unit. Twelve volts applied there 
will power the unit as well as charge the 
battery peck. 

For further information, contact icom 
America, fnc, 2tl2 IfGffi Ava. NE, ee/^e- 
vye WA 98004; (S06H54'S155. 

NEW HEADSET 

Telaic tias Introdyced a lightweight 
h otttfae i foe harkd-heio rand^mobiie trans- 
ceJven, The ProCom 352-IC weighs 2.6 
ounces wnen wom with the headband. 
However, when tt>e snapon headband Is 
rernoved, the fieadset weighs or^ ourvce 
and can be clipped directly onto eye- or 
sunglass frames. 

When using the headset, the radio re- 
mains on the operator's belt. There is no 
longer any need to hand-hold the radio 
for communlcatior^s. The headset is 
equipped with an in-line push-to-talk 
switch which also clips to a belt. 

A soft ear tip channels incoming mes- 
sages directly to tf>e opefatof's ear so 
communtcations are essentially private. 
The noise-cancetling elect ret mlcrophor^e 
is designed for very close ta^kir^ and 
trartsmits the ooeraior's voice dearly 
even in high-rtoise environments. The 
electret m*ke is also immune to efectro- 
magnetic or radio-frequency interference 
so it can be operated effectively near 
power lines, large transformers, genera- 
tors, broadcast towers, and other equip- 
ment which so often interferes with radio 
com mu n Icat i ons. 

The headset plugs dfrectfy Into lc«n or 
Ten-Tec hand-held transceivers. The unit 
Fs ava^labfe now al local two^ay radio 
dealers. For moiB intormation, contact 
Nofman Hansen at Taiex Commy/r/ca- 
f/oins. tftc.. mOQAmricft Ave.S. htioneapo- 
fi5 MN 55420. 



BUCCANEER SEALED 
ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS 

A new line of English-made sealed con- 
nectors for use Jn hostile environments, 
named Buccaneer, has been announced 
by BadiokH. thie US agent. TTie connoc- 
tors, which are made in bulkhead, chas- 
sis, and in4ino stytes. are available m 2^ 
3-, 6-. ar>d 7-pln configurations as welt as 
50- or 7S-0hm BNC (coaxial^ types for HF 
ami VNF radio. Tfiey are waterproof, dust- 

73 Magazine * May, 1984 109 



1 



uM of tCfew torminalft Of crimp connvo* 
tioni provlfl9« a«s« of wMnQ and r^aullB 
In a iufprisfftgly-imall-slzs unit. 

Originally d«Bigrv«} tor martne applEca- 
tion» wti«rQ ih9 conr^ectlng and dttisoiv 
nacung of power and signal aquipn^ant Is 



de«lrfld (!.«., »d«?ch ttghts, o«r^oritofa> rt- 
dloi, radars, aonars, masiheid antfrnnu, 
etc.), thea« contactors can bft uiad In 
mosi applications wnere reliability fa ea- 
swtlal. Other sugoeeted uaee are In duatv 
Of damp locations end ptaceo wtisfa a 
connection i* tubject to phyalcaJ alHiae, 



The unlla are mede from a hlQh^frnslty 
riberglae$-fi]led nylon. Al the c«bi«4n- 
try eml waterproof B''^"i"^*te mpy be 
chariged for ditferent cabte dtametere- 
Tbe meting seel is achieved by a com- 
presKsO pH-lng. Each connector has its 
own captive screw-down weatherpiroof 



cap whjcfi eEso aetvea at a tool for eeeem- 
biy and disa&^embiy of the connectof. The 
3^n verekv) Is rated 10 A at 250 V. 

For further Informetlofl, contact Radio- 
kit, Box 411, Qrmftvm* NM Q304&; ^03^ 
87&1U33. Dealer Inqulffaa Invtted. Reader 
Sttvlce numtier 476. 



RTTY LOOP 




Marc L Leavey, M.D. WA3AJB 
6 Jenny Lane 
Ptkesviile MD 21208 



\ left A tow Items hanging teat mcfith; 
this month I will see If I can ticiy up thoae 
few things. First off, we had looked et the 
problem of running a Murray-encoded teio^ 



rms 



printer off of a cofnpyter'a ASCtt output. 

It onfy It were the otiier way, thlni^ wilh 
e hardware solution (as we Ind^Ceted 
would be looked at} would be a iol eajler. 
Transforming Murray to A5CH Invotvei ■ 
lathef simple t>ookup (which can tw ao 
compltshed with a PROM or two. a UAm* 
m two, end a few support chips}, but con- 
verting the other way Is quite a bit more 
complex. Orve reason for this la the prob- 
lem of cese-shi fling In Murray. Although 
the ASCII machine may put out a SLmpJe 
string, say a Gailatgn, as ' W A-a^A-J-R" 



*i 



^' 



«— * 






t 



2 Tti 



r i^-e 

tTHf ^ 
L0C4L SELECT 
KCtS 



il,)l} 




ii 



2i 



1 



t& 



T4T4 



3 



JT J 



ji 



rf- 



JG 



ii_ 



1? 



•9 



4 



f»2 

2 7K 



■ I UOi 



IBO 

-Op— *WAp- 



^ 



• 9 



iMOiCATOR LEO 

(NOT OM aoAno) 




i. 






TP * 




— T 



'^< 



10 







Ci 



TlOO 
— '^^ — , 



21 



*fl 



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imsbum&wft oh sm.cc 



*s 

t 



ul3 



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li 



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EE 



I4lll 



1J14 



Id 






h * 



•0 





r" 




* « Ul9i 7 404 

^ >Uie 7404 

tdiMZM* T4D0 

U3 T*54 

u3 f*m 



K 



^ mB 



l£l 



Aiil 



1 



r4ft< 



T 



t* 




*i 



19 



f^ 



14 



II 



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11 



uii 

r44; 



ftV>V V y.wv V V 



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•s I — Tj; 

4-1 — ^ J^ 



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ij IU<7 

r* 



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I -NORMAL 
0*INS£BT 

— o-^ — 



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t4ia9 




i— i{>,t 



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0'4 1DB 



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Ult 

M'S- 

11^ s 



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40 



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$1 



K^ 



Fi^ 1 ASCtt-to-Murmy conwm^r. 



110 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



etmighleiray, sertdJnc the lame string In 
Muiray involves the a hi ft charactera, 
aerKfing "W-A-f IGS^LTBS-A^a'* These 
must be inserted in the pfopef piece with 
the stream of data coming downline. 

Anottw major probiem ts the tpee^ of 
trtnsmtssiofi. Aa we discussed last 
month, most ASCtt transmissions are rvn* 
ning a good deai faater than Myrray, and ^f 
yoy alfow tor the necesaUy of Inserting oo 
casionai UTRS and FiGS eheracters, the 
effective data rate becomes even slower. 

With this in mind, teke a look at Fig. 1. 
This circuit was originally published here 
In r3 In September, 1977, In an erticie writ- 
ten by J. Gary Mills VE4CM. Although the 
design may resemble a work of modern art 
to the notice, It reaiiy la quite stralghtfor' 
ward end one of the best of the lot that I 
have se^n. Serial ASCII IS accepted by the 
1013 UAHT at th^ left, and the parallel Out^ 
put Is decoded by a ^peclaliy programmed 
PROM into the Murray aquivalent. TTve 
data storad ^n the ROM I nciudes a bit to Irv 
Ojcaie the case of the chaiaeter* tn<i tesis 
are performed on the data streafn to insert 
ttie proper cas« shift where IrMllceied^ 

A clock circylt. shown In Fig. Z, te used 
to dfl^e the Murray output at any popular 
Speed from 60 wpm to 100 wpm (45.45 
tm\3^ to 75 t>au<f). The speed of the ASCII 
podion of th« circuil is fiked at 110 batjd, 
common iy celled 100 wpm, Please don't 
contuse 100 wpm Murray {75 baud) with 
100 wpm ASCIS (110 baud), it has to Oo 
with ih« greater number of data bits (il In 
ASCII, IM in Murray) and ifie need to 
send them faster to get the ^%rm number 
of characters out. if you still don't follow, 
reread last month's column, calcuiator In 
hand. 

Ifi order to interface this circuit with a 
teleprinter, the scheme presented In Fig. 3 
may be useful, This will serve to connect 
this^ or any other TTL-level output, to drive 
a Model 33 or Model 35 Teletype^ ma'^ 
chine, i think it may come in handy for 
many an application 

What abou^ that PROM, you say? Weil, 
the author of the original article presented 
an abbreviated coding laQie for the code 
conversion. Presented here as Fig. 4, it is, 
t agree, a bit sketchy. You can get the 
idee, however, and the complete diagram 
may still be avaiiaoie from tr>e author of 
the article or V£4 Logic, 70 SI. Cieif Bt^, 
Winnipeg Manitoba, Canada R2C WL 

The second line I ieft dangling was a 
new FnTY program written by Ctay 
At>rams K£AEP. Well. Clay has done II 
agairtl NEWRTYCW is a program written 
for a TRS^SOC Cotor Campiiter with 16K or 
more memory which 4oes not requlrs E3(- 
tended Basic or a disk to run (more on that 
last point later), it eneo^es She CoCo to 
send and receive Murrey RTTY, ASCii 
f^TTY, arwt Morse CW at essentially any 
speeo. 

This machine-language prog rem is sup- 
plied on a cassette tape which CLOADMa 
and executes automatically. This makes It 
Impossible to load and look at or dupli- 
cate with the SAVEM command. After 
booting, tha program asks for your call- 
sign or other iD, up to 31 characters which 
can be sent at a Keystroke. 

The program itself la rather striking in 
all it$ ah L lilies. There are four smell "sta- 
tion" buffers, 2544)yte buffers which are 
useful kH storing three or fouf lines of 
text. Also available is a keyboarij tpuffer* 





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(shown with 14K RAM 
and SK ROM) 



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• Biiill-in packe! Modem 

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teletype mac h mas 

• RS?3? s&rial interface- 45 to 9S0O bautJ 

• Uses &Dth ASCII ar^d Baudot 

• PrQgramm&d tor buth AX, 25 A VAOC m 1200 or BOO Daud 

• Ayiomaticaliy recognizes protocol of frcominfl messag&S 
» Over 60 commantis 

• Custom call sign op Hon 

• StOffis received rrsessages uriill f^quested dt a later ttme 
■ 'Block" made 'or translarring computer data 

• Operates as an unattended repeater 

• Activates leietypa moior to sprint messages 

• Board accepts up to UK at RAM 

• Can be customized for LANS and up to 56K RAW 

MODEL PK-1 wired 8f tested w/4K RAM 
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RTTY adapter board 12-95 

Custom cabinet— includes installation of TNC, on/off 
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Dimensions: 4.5 x 9.5 x 1.5 inches 

Pwr required: +12 VOC, approx. 200 ma. 

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.^See Ust of Actvertf&efS Of^ psg& 114 



TBMagazmB • May, 1994 111 




BAvDOf 
SPtED 



fig- 2r Clock <Srtvm cirattL 



I2K in 11x6 on « 32K raaenine, afid a pt^ 
ce^ve biftlef o1 ^qufif &i2e These tauffers 
may t» toftded from tape, savod to lape, o< 
printed out on ihe syatdm print er. The^e 
b also a raft of fealures. Lel'B look pt a 
few of thefTu 

On RTTY. an aiitomaiic CR/LF pair may 
be generated, \\ desfrad, aftar the tha^ 
actif In the tenth throuQh elQhtlath col- 
umn. At which position to Umi\, \t A\ all, is 
easily specified. Station buffers, key- 
board buffer, or even I he receive buffer 
may be Irani^mllied with a kayatroke. Un* 
shiM ort spacs Is supported and may bo 
turned off If dealred. The number of car- 
riage returna sent may be changed from 
the default of one up to nl ne. ThLa Is uaef ul 
on some drculta, auch aa MAR5, w hare I 
weN remember the raqulred CR^^R-LF^ 
LTS-LT5 sequence. TTiera la even an auto- 
matic RY generator! 

When operating CW, tt^e functlona are 
essentially the sama as with RTTY, with a 
tew eKceptions. T1>e speed of the Incom- 
fng atation ia tracl^ed, with transmit ape<ad 
being set ahead of tlrriie. All the buffers 
work the same^ as do the features, exeapt 
that the RY lesi does not aend Morae Va. 
However, there la a code-practica ofstlofi 
which sends random five^haraotar 
groups with the aud^o heard over the TV 
set speaker By the way. the CW portion 
provides several keya for ''spoclaiized" 
aignafs: tfie key is (he BT (—.,.—}, i is 
itw AR f . - . — , J, the - la the AS (.— . . ,% 
BiHf several oitiers 



Now, there are a few problems with this 
program. &orTYi Clay, but I do have my 
opinion! Firai of all. tttia is a self-boot log 
tape. While 1 have no need to copy il» I 
woutd like to transfer it to diak, at lea at to 
load it. That cannot be <$one, aa it aa^ 
aumes control of the machine aa aoon a a 
it loads. 

Secondly, saves and loads can only. 
c::urrent3y. be made with tape. Clay does in- 
dicate, however, that a diak version la in 
the wofka. 

And finally. If you hav^e the CW tfansmil 
spaed set, say, at 15 wpm and tune In a 
station sending at f]ve, your response will 
stay at the faster speed unless you break 
out ot the racaive routine and reset the 
speed. KIrkd of messy. Two posaibia soEu- 
tlons would be to have the sending spaed 
approKlmate the receiving speed (opt ion- 
ally, of course) or to have a control func- 
tion reset the speed while still receiving^ 

One more thing— the keyboard input 
aaems a little sLugglah on my CoCo2. 
When Tandy upgraded the Basic ROMs, 
they moved the routine that polls the key- 
tx^rd for input by a lew ibytea. If this pfO' 
gram fs using the old address, that would 
explain the sluggishness. I can't chec^ II 
because of the "locked" nature ot the pro- 
grarnL 

The adutiOfi is to use extended indirect 
addressing instead of plain extended ad^ 
dressing. It onli^ taXes one byte of data, 
bui it woutd mean reas semis ling the whole 



MULTI-BAND SLOPERS 

160, 80, 40, 30, &20 METERS 

Outitanding DX j»ar tor mane e of W9INN Slopers is well hnowiii Now en - 
iov multiband BIG-SIQNAL reportsi Au toma I ic tiands witching' Very 
tow SWB 'Coax feofl * 3kw power < Cinnpact ■ F tj L LT AS S E M BL E D 
^Hang from anif support 25 ll high or higtter . Easy to insiaii * Very 
low profile *C4mpiei« Init met ion s -Yoyr personal chock accepted 

4BA^JD SLQPER 160 SO.^O 30Melera>60ft. long $ 46 oo UX pp^ct 



a BAND SLQPER' flO ft 40 Meters ^ 41 ft, tocig 



S 35 o« tn pfjd 



3-BANOHOTRAP DIPOLE. t60. B0.&40M- 113 tt long S 66 oo tit ppd 
a^BANDNQTWAPPyOLE. >0.&40M > B4n loftg S 49.oo if f ppd 

FOR ADDN L INFO on these and Qther uriiqueamemMS..... SEfJD SASE 

W9INN ANTENNAS 
BOX 393 -S MX PROSPECT TL 60056 




AMPMf not it 2«»00-? 

lECf FTAClC CFE4IJ4.E] 
IWAtes «prN P>UJ& T-HALS- 
ON MCOEL 3S 441 111 



fee Bio 



Fig. 2. T9iBpfmt& Mmface. 



proiraiiL Oh well, somethir^g mora to 
ttlink about ! 

All in all, thils program looks hard to 
beaL Clay saya that he Is selling th^em like 
hotcakes. i am sure he would t^Ke to fieai 
from youL Drop him a note care of Clay 
Abroms Softwttfs, 1758 Comstock L^ne^ 
San JOM CA 96124. and tell film WA3AiR 
aerti youl 

Hoftt, a lot of you have t»efi writing me 
rKrtes and asking for a repeat ol sofiie of 
the twatcs. I don't ttiink that retuna here 
are in order. tHit I wM agree that there are 
many newcomers out tfiece who might 
befiefit from a review of material printed 
here several years ago. Therefore, I cau- 
tiously announce a new service. I shall try 
to put togethef on a monthly basis a com- 
pendium of RTTY material to be available 



by mail from the above address. Tfie first 
edition will be an e lwnar i t ary jntroduction 
to RTTV. with ottier topi^ to tpllow In !»• 
ture months. Suoh items as RTTY recep- 
tion, trar^missiofl. and mecliinta vm 
some of the items I ticpe to review. \ shali 
announce each edition here as it becom«« 
awfttlabte. 

To reoefve your copy, |uat send S2.0O 
and a self -addressed, stamped envelope 
(or sufficient US funds for fofeign poat- 
age) to me at the above addresa, I hope 
ttiis answers the needs expressed In so 
many of your letters. Waicti thta column 
for announcements of future edHiona> 

Next month begins our eighth year of 
RTTY Loops. It la sura to be axd ling, so be 
sure your aubscriptlon io 73 is current and 
watch for each month's HTTY Loop. 





Addms 




Data 






HiN 


Binary 


H«x 


Binary 


Character 


Purpose 


00 


OOOOOOOO 


40 


OIOOOOOO 


NUL 




0! 


00000001 


FF 


11111111 




ASCII to Baudot 


10 


00011011 


56 


01011011 


FSG 


CntI ancf Figs, 


30 


0011 oooo 


36 


00110110 







31 


00110001 


37 


00110111 


1 




3F 


00111111 


39 


001 11001 






40 


010O0O0O 


FF 


11111111 






41 


010O0O01 


03 


00000011 


A 


ASCII to Baudot 


42 


01000010 


19 


00011001 


B 




4 -i ¥ 










Letters 


61 


01100001 


03 


00000011 


a 




62 


01100010 


19 


00011001 


b 




7F 


01111111 


5F 


01011111 


RO 




m 


lOOOCKMKI 


00 


OOOOQGOO 


SLNK 




•» V r 


10000001 


4S 


01000101 


E 


Baudot to ASCII 


96 


lOOflOII 


82 


10000010 


FIGS 


Unahitted 


QC 


10011 too 


4D 


01001101 


M 




9D 


10011101 


58 


01O110OO 


K 




S€ 


toon 110 


m 


01010110 


V 




OF 


10011111 


7F 


01111111 


LTRS 




AO 


10100000 


60 


10000000 


BiXK 




A1 


toioooot 


Ba 


10110011 


3 


BttuttottoASai 


BE 


10111110 


B6 


10111011 


■ 


ShIttHj 


SF 

Ol 


10111111 
ItOOttWO 


7F 

iQ 


01111111 

tODOoom 


LIBS 
8LN1C 





Auto unshift 
DF 11011111 7F Ollltin LTRS on space 



BO 11100000 FF 11111111 



FF 11111111 FF 11111111 



Unused 



Ftg, 4. AhbrmlM^ PROM coding tist 



112 73 Magazine * May, 1984 




mjo iiw wi.j p ; M m :.'!? ' 



RTTY CW ASCII 

COMPUTER FNTERFACE 
* BETTER RELIABILITY 
* MORE FEATURES 
*««ft /vt-' USE WITH ALL POPULAR SOFTWARE 
$289-95 * L C TUNED FILTERS 

* USE WITH MOST HOME COMPUTERS 
WRiTE OR CALL FOR MORE IWFORMATIOIM: ^37 

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RO. BOX 1083 • SALEM, OR 97308 • 503-399-7406 



AMATEUR AND COMMERCIAL 
COMMUNrCATION SERVICES 



m 



CORAPUTER OWNERS 



AT LAST! 



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• Send/Receive CW with your VIC 20, PET, 
Commodore 64, Atari 300/400! 

* RTTY for your VIC 20 artd Commodore 64! 

♦ Package includes program cassette, J/0 Connector, 
H ard w are Sc hem at i c s^ • & A S£ f or De tai J s . 

oRVCt CW- $14.95 

Qt^VC'. RTTY -$16.95 



e 



Both For $26.95 SA VE! 







A 



WIRED/TESTED TU J90,00 

COMPLETE KIT TU S60.00 

TU CIRCUIT BOARD $10,00 

ADD S2,00 SHIPPING EACH ORDER 

Many other Programs \n atock. 

Amateur Accessories, D^pt C 

6 Harvest Ct, RD7, Flemington. N.. 73. 822 

(201^782-1551, 6:30 10:30 PM Eastarn 

_ We Stock Tha WFJ122jt CW/RTTYJASCII Interface 



hcnrwoe 



3 NEW PROGRAMS FOR VIC 20 

OSO MANAGER Cfock, 10-minute ID timer, Nc?te- 
pad, Gneat for phone or CW QSOs. 

HAM LIST QSO memory Jogger. Fast search, en- 
try and updafe of QSO data. 

QUICK LOG Search by call, QTH. Automatic time 
log Excellent for contest or daily logging. 

Cassette, instnjctions $9- 95j program. 

JOHN VESTY COMPANY 

415 Elm Stneet, Fayetlwille, N.Y. 13066 



SYNTHESIZED 

SIGNAL GENERATOR 



MADE IN 
EJ5A 




MODEL 

SG100D 

$349.95 

plus shipping 



• Covers 1 DO to 1 85 MHz m1 kHz steps with ttiumb- 
wheel dial • Accuracy 1 part per 10 milHon at all fre- 
quencses • Internal FM adjustable from to 1 00 kHz 
at a 1 kHz rate • Spurs and noise at least 60 CJB be- 
low carrier • RF output adjustable from 5-SOO mV at 
50 ohms • Operates on 1 2 Vdc @ 1 /2 Amp • Avail- 
able for pmmediate delivery • $349.95 plus shipping 

• Add-on Accessones available to extend treq. 
range, add intirilte resolution, voice and sub-aud^ble 
tones, AM, precision 120 dB calibrated attenuator 

• Call lor details* Deaiers wanted worldwide. 



VANGUARD LABS 

IOe-23 Jimaitu Av«., HoIIIb, NY 11423 
Pliont:(21£) 468-2720 



^311 



** Technical assi&tam» by F.C.C. Ilcen&ed t^chrilcians usiing the fins at repair, iMt, 
and fll^nrriient equipment to give you results ypu can count on. 

•REPAIRS -TESTS •INSTALLATfONS 

•ALIGNMENTS •MODIFtCATIONS -EVALUATIONS 

••FC.C. Licenses; 
^Ge^wral Radiote^^phtone {ship radar erKiors«d| 

* Second CI ass Rlldlotelegraph (ship radar and aircraft radioMegraph endorsed) 
•Amateur Extra Cta&a 

Sun. thru Thurs. 



Geff NfiCE 
517-62S«M4 






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13313 FOREST HILL RD, 
GRAND LEDGE, MICHIGAN 46637 




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FREE CATALOG 

Irtcludas afl Curreni, Obsolete, An 
tique, Hard-To-Find Recefving, 
Broadcast, fndustoai, Radio/TV 
types. LOWEST PfilDES, Maior 
Brands, In S^ock. 
UHfTY Eleclnpmcs DepL S 
0. Box Z13, Elizabeth, NJ 07206 




Off! 

ALLIANCE 

Dual-Speed 

ROTOR 

for HA MS 



^J^'"^'%. 



^^tlI ^ & 



ALLIANCE HD-73 Duai-Speed rotor for Medium 
sized Ham antennas. Strong aluminum construction 

wtth hardened-heavy pitch steel gears & 100 hall bear- 
ings. Rated for up to 10.7 it^ wind load area ^ 1000 lb 
vertical load. 450 in/lbs starting torque. Mounts in- 
to we f, on tower or mast; accepts \W-2W' O.D. mast 
Rotates at (1) RPM for moving over a large arc or ^hw 
for peaking signals. Automatic brake system, large 3V^" 
meter, calibrated S-W N-E-S in 10° mcrements. Black 
case, brushed aluminum front panel & bezel. 17 lbs. 

Regular S 1 54^^ - Sate Price $99^^ 

Order direct from this ad. Send Check or Money Order, 
For prompt $h!pment, Call TOLL FREE and use your 
MASTERCARD or VISA; COD orders accepted. Allow S7 
for UPS shipping charges \n tbe 48 Starts. 



AM ATE U R 

ELECTRONIC SUPPLY' 

4828 W. Fond du be Avenue 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53216 

Phone: (414) 442-4200 

Wisconsin WATS; 1-800-242-6195 

Nationwide WATS: 1-800-558-0411 

AES Branch Stores in; C fear water, FL • 

Orlando, FL • WickliHe. OH • Las Vegas, HV 




Fox Tango 

Filters 



Your rig — old or new — is 
no better than its l.f. filter. 

TOP PERFORMANCE 

Fox Tango Filters contain eighE 
specially treated discrete quartz 
crystals, unlike miniature ceramic or 
monolithic corner-cutting designs. 
Give your set new fife with a Fox 
Tango implant or transplant. It's a 
lot cheaper than buying a new rig 
with features you don't need and 
probably won't use! 

VARIETY 

Fox Tango stocks superior CW, SSB^ 
and AM filters for praclically all 
Yaesu, Kenwood, and Heath models. 
Also for Drake R-4C, 7-line; Coffins 
75S3-B/C, and some ICOM's. More 
than 80% of our filters self for $60. 
Most are designed for easy drop-in 
Installation. For the others, com- 
plete Instructions and all needed 
parts are Included In the price. 

INFORMATION 

Tell us the make and model of your 
set. Yoult get the complete informa- 
lion on FT filters to fill optional 
spots, replace your present tired or 
inferior sfock units or supplement 
them with Fox Tango Filter-Cascad- 
fng kits. If you phone you can order 
at the same time; we accept VISA/ 
MC or ship C.O.a 

GO FOXTANGO — to be SUREl 
Ask the ham who has one, 

FOX TANGO CORPORATION 

Box 15944, Dept. 
West Palm Beach, FL 33416 
Telephone: (306) 683-9587 
Dealer inquiries invited. 



J 



t^Sse List of Advertisers on page 114 



73 Magazine • May J 964 113 



ADVERTISERS 



To recaive fuli information from our advertis^ 
ers please complete the postage-paid card. 



n-s^tto. 



P AQfl' Hk Sk HOL' 



P»ia fL&Ho, 



Page ft S^ Nou 



176 Ace Communicaiiona, Inc .54 

124 Advafic«d Computer Qontiols 

■■■^■liBB mm Bi j« ■ ■ ei ■■ bi ■ rniifrii I'^l 

127 Advanced Computer Goritrol 9 

" AEA/Advanced Electronic 

Applications .,,.,...,, ia»45 

20 All ElectfOnics ..« .......»..* . .63 

Zt 1 Amateur Accessor! fts ,.,..... > 113 

Amatetjf Corrununic^iioiis. Etc 

* Amaiaii/ Elactrorvic Supply 

479 Amateur Wholesale EJectronica 

243 AnTateiir-W!K>ltHiale E^ectfOfilcs 

109 Analog TAchfiology 115 

228 Austin Custom Antennas .54 

Auiek Research 88 

202 B & L Engineering ....... 140 

1 77 BarKer & Wi II i amsoft. Inc. ^ * . . W 

30S Barry Electronics ,,.,.,...,.. ,23 

BiitAahby &Son . . . .^..... ...13i 

Birch HHlSa!«a ,.97 

272 Bird Electronics 101 

Btachsburg ©roup. ,,,,,.,. .22.50 

Brttt'9 a Wty ...... , .^ , , 7B 

Butternut Electronics. 89 

* CE EngineerinQ, Inc. ...... 1 T1 

482 CES, Inc. T , , , , T . , , , , ^ T r . ■ — 139 

477 CESJnc. .109 

89 Ciutterfree Modular Ccnsoles 

...,. ......,„. ,,.137 

CoHco Elecironie*. tnc. . 55 

t3 Coin International , 119 

iA Com muni cat tons Concepts, Inc. 

105 



166 

IS 

* 
37 

25 
141 

m 

346 

tee 

425 

18 
29 
22 



23 



143 

288 

167 
31 

101 
271 

476 

• 

33 
460 

123 

■ 

39 

273 

122 



Communic^tifing Specialists, tnc. 

7S 
Communications Special i$t$, Irn:- 

Oomputer Tradet 1 19 

Contemporary Techriology, tfna. 

.i. ■»■ ■■■ ■ ■ !■■■ KB B's-fe >«'•■■■ BBvavvv I ivr' 

Control Products, Unlimited * . , 105 
Cushoralt Corporation. ....... ,77 

DGM Electronics ....,..._., .58 

Data Servtce * . . . ItS 

Oi amoffid Worldw (de . « «> ^ » ^ . . . 101 

Doppter Systems .,.w#.»^^ 

EGE ,-.--. . . -^ . . .rT*v* .^* , - - . -63 

Electronic $pecJ^i$t$, Inc 3B 

EMti^C EnQineerin<g .115 

Fair Badlo Saies .110 

R^tier Corporation ..,..,..,, .M 
Fox-Tar)go Corporation ....... 113 

GLB Electronics .34 

GLB Electronics , 111 

Gtiost Fighters .,,,.,.. ,4 

H.Stewart Designs. ,.,.,„,, .101 

HaMronix _ M 

Ham MasterTapes ._,.,,,.... TS 
Hem Master Tapes „.,..,,.... 43 
Ham MasterTapes .....-*-... 1 17 
Ham Radio Outlet .....«...,.,. ,3 

Hemtrontcs, NY 142, 143 

M ertoi 'Tek t « . . 1 10 

Horizon Printing Co. .t IS 

Hustler, Inc. ...........*..... 130 

ICOM CovJl109 

J AL Radio Comm. 65 

Jan Crystals .«,.««.,.«, ,,. ^^ , p .69 

JohnJ.Meshna, Jr., Inc. ...... ..144 



158 



T # « #*'•"* 4 



.7,8,9. 



82 
9 

46 
45 



89 54 



49 
51 
207 

m 

256 
352 
270 
138 
254 

412 
137 



John Vesty Col .. 
Jufi'sElactrtmies 

KLM Elect nonic$ , 
Kantronks . . . . ^ . 

Kenwood 

Larsen Antenna* ....... 

MCMCommutifcaiiorw .. 
MFJ Entetpflsss ........ 

MHz Electronics ...,,.., 
Madison Electronics .... 

MftggJore Electronic Labs 
Magnum Distributors, tnc. 
MIcrooompulBr Business 
Appllcstions .......... 

Micro Control Specialties 

Mlcrolog Corporation 

MJcroiog Corporation . . . - 
Mj^rageComnrunlcitlOF^ - 
M^$$ogrl Radio Company. 
MfU^ftoring Ttmvw . , , ^ , , , 
Mouser Electronics . . 
Mam|}s Satellite Systems 
Natlortal Comm. Group Compariy 



»•'*.•»•• 4 i * 



4 

212 

^70 

-148 

■ 

61 
478 

268 
62 



Kernal Electronics 

^c/rsAVo/fs 

Of<^r Magazine — ..„ 

PCEIeclronJcs ........ 

Parsec CommunJ cat Ions 
Pa rsec Communications 
PlpoComn\ , . . . . p . « > . . 

Processor Concepis . . . . 

PupNc Domain, Er>c 
QCD Marketing Sen/ices 
Radio Amaieur Cafibook, 
B^dioKlt. ............. 

Radio Warehouse 

Ramsey Electronics . . . , 
Ramsoy Electronics . . . . 



..113 
,.140 
...67 
...51 
63,69 
vCov.rv 

w -m m- * »■ m Tw* ' 

-,.70»T1 

.120-129 

136 

93 



• * « « « 1 0B 
.,•..141 
k ..... 21 
....-49 

-62,109 
17 

mmmmmm. WW 

,137 
,33 



» I- + I 4 * * 



Inc. 



...S3 
..106 
..115 

...92 

.,.50 

...97 

..113 

...90 

.,105 

.101 

...22 

...63 

..109 

...lit 

...145 

..=130 



BOOKS, etc. 



AMATEUR RADIOfELECTRONICS TITLES 



Catalog « 


Horn 


Pried 


Catalog # 


BK7307 


Behir>d the Dial 


$ 4.95 


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cnaos 


5 WPM Code Tape 


4.96 


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6 + WPM Code Tape 


4.95 


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CT7313 


13-1- WPM Code Tape 


4.96 


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CT7320 


20 + WPM Code Tape 


4.95 


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Cn325 


25 + WPM Code Tape 


4.95 


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Cn394 


Code Tapes (any four atxwej 


15^ 


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BK7308 


Contest Cookbook 


535 


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BK732T 


AGyi^mHam Radio 


4J5 


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Hobby Compyt&fs Are Here 


2.40 


CC7400I3 


BK7393 


Living on a Shoestring 


757 


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BK7312 


The Mafiic of Ham Radio 


4Jd5 


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T?>e New Hotjby Computers 


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LB7365 


Test equip. Ub. VO-Vols. 2, 3, 44 


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World Repeater Atlas 


2.00 





MICROCOMPUTER TITLES 

Item 

Annotated BASIC Vol. 1 
Annotated BASIC Vol. 2 
Inside Youf Computer 
Introduction to TBS-aO Data Files 
Kilobaud Klassroom 
Mach. Lang, Subfoytir>es for CoCo 
Pfog. for Electronic Circuit Design 
BK7400 with Apple disk 
BK7400 with IBM PC disk 
BK7400 w*th TRS« ditll 
The Sotectftc™ Interface 
Some of the Best from Kilobaud 
TR&eO as a Controller 
TBS^OfZaO AaMmt)ly Lang. Library 
Understamljng & Prog. 
Microcomputers 

SHELF BOXES 



PaO» 



Shelf box— 1 
Shelf boxoft— 2*7 
Shelf boxes *-S and up 



«-'*-»-V-9'#-q'A« 



....02 

M 
..,141 

35,119 
. . 101 
55 



* Robert Ijee FirteGoid .,.,,**.••. .5 

• Roctvester Hamfest .....,,.,.. .95 
RUNMagazhw ..82 

500 73 

UeS-LSr AO ^ ....... . 

MLaJlingUsts ... 

Moving . » ■ « .^ . . 

Siibscript ions * . 

Sat^ H te Video Systems 
107 Sintec Compeny , , 
68 Spectrum Comrnunlcat ions . . .801 01 
436 Spectrin Intemsttortai. inc. .... .83 

Spider Antenna ,...,..,....... 115 

' Teiev Convnunications, Inc. .... 100 

Trac Dectfonics .,,-.. 99 

TfieAntefinaSpeciattst^Ca. ..,.,,17 

The Hamshack . ...... T3l 

The Metlief^ CorporatliOn 137 

ThonyxtrMlustnes...^.... .88 

Tixr^on Amateur Packet Radio 

08 



76 

63 

« 

295 
104 
13@ 

166 
2D3 

196 

* 

149 



3t1 
90 



*|pvii*ik<.« 



80 



83 



Unadiilaffleycolii^ine 


. - 66 


Unk:orn£lecircKiice , 


,24.25 


Univer^l Amateur Radio . . . 


... Ill 


University Microf itms ...... 


..,,115 


Unique Comm. Corp. 


.115 


Unity Electronics 


....113 


Van Gorden Engineering . . . 


v,,.l06 


Vangua/d Latie ^, , . .113 


VaCom Products Corp 


.....M 


W9INN Antennas 


. . . . 112 


Vtfest<:orn ....... x .....,, . 


....t01 


Westech EEactronicSjnCp , 


91 


Western Radio Electronics 


....119 


Wheeler Applied Research Lab 


•;'*> *+.h.i'ip^.--.-^-.4.T 


.,..119 


Wllllama Radio Sales . 


...,119 


Woodall &. Associates ^ , , , 


,..,119 


Yaesu Electronics .....,,, 


.CO^/JII 



Prioe 
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24.97 
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29.97 
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24.97 
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2.00 

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SHIPPING AND HAN* 
DUNG: S1.50 for the firsi 
book. St. DO for each addi- 
tional book for US del ivefy 
arvd foreign surface. 
S10.00 per book tor for- 
eign airmail Ofdefs pay- 
able in US dollars only. 

Complete the postage 
paid card, or itemize your 
Ofder with paymen! or 
complete credit caid in* 
formation (include post* 
age and handling to: WQ 
Books^ ATTN. Retail 
Sales, Rte, 101 and Elm 

St, Petefborough, NH 
03458. 




114 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



THE 

BEST PLACE 

To Look For 

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RS-232 SERIAL LINE MONITOR 



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Post Office Box 33602 

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MICROWAVE PREAMPUFIER8 

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73 Magazine * May, 1984 115 



«M| 




Chod Harris VP2ML 

Box 4881 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

THE WONDROUS WWV— 
PART 2 

Hav« you been listening to WWV at 16 
minutes after the hour as I suggested ladt 
monihT If not, turn on your receiver, tune 
tn WWV at 10000.000 HHz. ind tiaten aa 
you read th^a. 

In addition to its mmin I unci 4 on of pio- 
vldlfHT a tl^ma and ffvquefKry atarxiard, 
WWV efso dlssafnlnatea kntormat^on for 
other g<3V9mment ageocJee. IncJudad ara 
storm warnings at 6-iO minutea afief the 
hour and Omega ntvlgatiofi Infonnatlon 
at 16 mlnytes aftar dht Omttga system la 
• VLF location ay«tam— tO-14 kHz). lYm 
Information of great est Inleraat to ama* 
teur^radio operatora, especially DXers, ta 
the Gooatsft buUatfna, at Ifi minutes after 
each hour. 

The information In these tHJilellnB \b 
produced by the Natlonat Oceanic and 
Atmoepharic Administration (NOAA), 
which ananes space In the a a me building 
aa the Kational Bureau of Standards' 
master cesium-tteam clock (eee this coi^ 
umn, last month.) 

Every three hours an officer at the 
NOAA Space Envlror^ment Services Cen- 
|«f in Bf>ul{ler picks up a phone and calls a 
IpeciaJ drum recorder in the n^aster clock 
worn at me WWV iranamitier site, as 
mi lea to tfm riorth In Fort Col 1 1 r^, Col- 
orado. That d/um is cont roiled In the same 
way aa the tirum which naa tne voice time 
•nnouncementa. Whan the I3th minute 
rolls arourtd, the recording Is broadeasi 
on WWV. fr'ou can also listen io the 
message t>y calling (303H99-S12B,) 

The form of the message doesn't vary. 
First comee the solir-flux level from Ot- 
tawa, Canada. This Is follow^ by the A In- 
dex, the K index, and information on eolar 
activity and geomagnetic storms. DXers 
can compile this informailori ar^J use It to 
Increase their DX efficiency, especially in 
Umoe ol low sunspois. such as now. Let 'a 
lOQlt at this informaiion and see how It re- 
latee to OXing. 

IHeSoJarFlm 

ma first item covered in the Geoa>ert 
bulletin is the solar flux. This It the 
anxKjnt of radiation coming from the sun 
at 2800 Mhtz^ as measured in Ottawa (Ot- 
tawa figures are used tMcauae they have 
been recorded aJnc« 1947 aruJ tiwy pro- 
vide ft consistent picture of ttva sun.) This 
solai-Mux figure is directly related to the 
number of suns pots on the surface of the 
sun facing the Earth, it Is easier and more 
consistent to measure the solar fiuM than 
to go through the somewhat arbitrary cei- 
Culations of sun^pot numbers. And solar 
flux can tie measured when It's clou<fy! 

The aolar-riia Indent ranges from 66 to 
about 250 or evert hi^^ter. A reading of 86 
Is aquivalent to ^ero aunapots— zilcfi! At 
alKiut 80, therv is efKMjgn radiatk^o com- 
^ from the sun to open the 15- and 
lO^meter t^amls to some parts of the 
world lii|^>er readings suggest a better 
loriospherB. from the harrvcadio point of 
view. What Is mcksi impoftant atiout ttie 
9io^u riuK^ however, is ttie imnd of the 
figures. A rising II ux sug^g^sts improving 
band conditions, falling figures indicate 
the trends are Ejeteriorating. 

110 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



Also, the fiax figures provide soo^e p^e^ 
dietive value for the next month. Since the 
soiar flux is tied directly to sunspot activ- 
ity and because the spots swing around 
it the sun rotates abogt once every 27 
daySp you can maks some guesses about 
radJo condltlone 27 days ahead, based on 
today's figures. AJas^ the sun is more tick* 
le than this suggests. Even the largest 
spots have been known to completely dis> 
appear as they go around the bacl^ of the 
sun. And r\ew spots spring: up wlthoul 
warning, Sllii. the vafue of the flu)( £7 days 
ago la one of our t^est pfedictors of band 
coTKlitions. Just don't bet y^gr Hfe on IL 

Anothv useful predi^or based ort the 
solar fiujc is a sudoen inetasM in iia value. 
The svtra radiatk>n auggeata that mora 
particles will iie streaming from the sun, 
and It's these lo<^, electrons, etc^ wttich 
tlir up the Ionosphere and give us good 
OKing. Tttese particJea n^ove at speeds 
less than Ihal of flghtn so they arrive a day 
or two after the fiux values change. So a 
sudden increase In solar flux suggasta bei- 
ter fcwnd conditions in the next day or aa. 

To make the bast use of the flux figurss, 
you should write them in your log dally. 
Then compare radio pmpagatEon ar your 
QTH^ with yoi/f equipment^ to the (lux val- 
i^M, With time, you will begin to see how 
that solar flux coneiates to DXtng from 
your Stat Ion. DX dubs oKen have a ri^em- 
ber wtvo keeps track of tt«ef luit vaiMs or^ a 
daily basis and shares ttte data over a re- 
peater. And some of tiw DX bulletins put> 
lish this infonnation. But entering this fig- 
ure dally in your own log is stiit tne best 
way to track band openings Try to Qel the 
figure soon after the IflOOZ daily update. 

The Dthai Flguraa 

While Bo^ar-flux level Is a good predlc* 
tor of future band conditions, the A and K 
indices provide a better Idea of what Is 
happening now on th€ bands. The A index 
is a figure between and about 100 (al- 
though readings as high as 400 have tMsn 
recorded). It Is a measure of the geomag- 
netic activity of the Earth's magrMtic 
field. V^ien the A Index is low, not mM^ it 
happefilng, and signals pass with little at* 
tanuallon or loss. An index reading of 10 
or less auQipaats "quiet '^ conditions, |ust 



what the DXsf ofdered. As the sun starts 
acting up, nowever, the A irKtax will rise, 
the Eaftfi's magnetic flekj starts jumping 
around, aftd absorption incfeases^ Your 
signals get weaker. At tilgti at>3orp1lon 
lewela, you m^ght as well turn off the radio 
arKi go mow the tawn or get reacQuainted 
witri your family. 

Unfortunataty, ttie A Intiex Is yestvrda/t 
news. Even though It Is updated every 
thfee hours, It reflects wtiat went on in ttia 
Ionosphere yastorday. So when you hear a 
high value on the A ir>cSax, you know that 
the bands stunk yesterday, aomelhing 
you were probably already aware of. This 
is similar to getting weather "forecasts** 
for the previous day. 

So why pay any attention to the A int- 
dex7 First, the tmnd of the ir^dex is impor* 
tant. tf the absorption level la rising, tr>e 
bands will be getting worse, if it's falling, 
maybe you should anticipate spaiidlno 
motm time on the air. Also, as with soiar 
flux, tne A in^ax tertds to repeat at 27^y 
intervals, as trie sun notalaa, A ^d day 
(high A valLi*^ 27 days ago suggesia today 
will be pu4iko, iQo. Of course, tl>e vsganas 
of the sun ar>d a little Murphy keep this 
from becomina as simple as It seems. 

The A index is especially meaningful as 
related to polar radio propagation ti^ 
high-latitude east wast paths. The norths 
south paths are little affected even on 
days of high A rasdings. So conaidar 
swinging the beam to the aouth on days of 
high absorption. 

The last figure given in the l&mlnuies- 
after4h«-h0ur Gecalerts Is the K Index. 
This is similar to the A index, except that It 
Is much more eurrant, U is actually mea- 
sured right ai tfw Boulder, Colorado, labs 
and updated every three hoyrs like trve A 
Index. The K index varies from to 5, with 
the higher numbers reflociing higher ai> 
sorption, Just as with the A index. A K 
reading of 4 or & suggests lawn mowing. A 
low K of or 1 means tt might Pe well 
worth tuning around tt>e bande. 

Afjiln, the frertcf of itie imlax Is ss Inv 
portani as the actus! value. II the K index 
Is higher Ihan II was three hours ago, 
things are getting worse. Toll your spouse 
you'll go out to dinner after ail, Decreas* 
Ing K readings mean the al^orplion is 
lessening. 

To recap these numbers, OXers pray for 
high solar flux arKl low A and K readings. 
A soFa? flux of 200. A = 3, sr^ K^^O would 
be a tjanner day to DXers. A flux o( 85, 
A 3: 34. and K=:=4 en^ursges even the 
moat avid DXer to conskter stamp collect- 
Ifig. 




Photo A. Tfte cofitrof room at th$ Spap» BnviTonmmii Services Center In Bould»r, Cotor- 
•do. information on the siste of the sun and the Earth's magnetic fleid pours into IMm 
communications hub anrf is dtBtilim:i ittto the wwV btiffetina at 18 minutes after the hour. 



Storm Warnings 

The last Item on the Geoaierts is a de^ 
scfiption of sots' aciivity, espeeially 9^y 
solar flares, Rares are sudden eryptiona 
on the surface of the sun which fling out 
•mxmous numbers of chaiged particles 
Into spacer Rares occur vety suddenly, 
lasting a few minutes to a few hours. 

Flares can be real disasters fof DXers. 
The swarms of particles and ions rip up 
our ionosphere^ sending aDsorption sky 
high {\i you'll pardon the pun). A major 
flare can producs a Sudden ionospheric 
Disturbarice (SID). Most hams have Byi- 
perlenced one or more of these: You turn 
on Y^ur rig and you heer nothing, ab^ 
solutely nothing— not on any band. I once 
a pent two hours ripping apart my station 
and tearing into my receiver, certain (hat 
something was seriously wrong. Of 
course, something was wrong, txit with 
the iof^ospher©, not my station. It was sev- 
eral hours twfors the bands began slowly 
to return to normal. 

There ts nothing you can do about the 
SIOs^ When one hits, tufii off the radio anA 
walk away. Unfoftunately, we'll be seeing 
a hot more of these DX d is est era in the 
next few years. With declining sunspot ac- 
tivity, SiDs tend to t»come more common. 
Also, there seems to be s vague 22-yesr 
cycle associated with SlDs, and the 
1964-19S5 range le 22 yeara after some of 
ti>e most severe SIDe ever recorded. 

Fortunately, WWV will give you some 
advance warning about SIDs. The Space 
Environment Services Center |SESC) moiv 
Itocs the X-ray output of the sun cort- 
stantly. Informal ion on the X-ray level 
poors into the Boulder tabs from stations 
all over the globe and from two sa tell ilea 
atx>ve the Earth. GOES 9 lAdft^ This infof- 
mation reflects activity on the sun as cur^ 
renily as possitrie, wtth onty an B-mlnute 
delay for tfve speed of llglit. 

The information on the X^^ay flux Is 
automatically charted on s video monitor 
{see Photo C| as one part of the SESC corv 
trol desk (see l=^oto A). The office le 
manned 24 hours a day, with staff such as 
Master Sergeant Harry Sorg (see Photo B} 
keeping e close eye on any sudden 
changes In the value^ The close-up photo 
of the video screen shows a Class M flare, 
serious enough to disrupt communica- 
tions. A Class X flare wipes out every- 
thing, and a very powsffur Class X flare 
car> knock out power lines and do ottver 
physical damage. High-flying airliners on 
polar routes might be exposed to exces- 
aive radiatioo during flares. And persoru 
living In high^atHude regions will be 
treated to a gioriqus aurora, which they 
might as well watch, since all radio props- 
gatlort will tw nonexistent t 

But thanks to the time lag Iselween 
wtien the flare starts (as indicated by the 
sudden burst of X-rays| and the time the 
particles which do Iha damage arrive (a 
day or so laterj, SESC can issue warninga 
to help reduce damage. And vital com' 
munications lines can be prepared for the 
ooming radio blackout. When a major 
flare starts, Sergeant Sorg and his couiv- 
terparts start notifying a list of customers 
tfial the partlcies are on (he way. And they 
also put tt»e Information into tfie geophys^ 
leal alerts at Ihe end o* the 1B-mJnutes- 
after4he-t)Our WWV bulletins. 

Ttw SESC tries to predict flare activity 
based on complex models artd studies ot 
the sun. The magrtallG fields around the 
sunspots, the relative rriotion ol the spots. 
Urn fiafe history of a spot group, and oit>er 
information Is compiled and analyzed at 
the SESC office to generate this forecast 
ot Hare activity. 

So when you hear the words "Solar ac- 




^n 



Phato B. MAsWf S^fgGsrtt H^rry Sofg points to tfte aoiar ftsre recorded on the vfcfeo 
screen. X-ray data ffom ground stations and satoffiteB f&veafs the current state of &otaf 
activity. 



tivtty expected to be high'* on the WWV 
bulletin, be prepared for some firewortis. 
On The other hand, the irtflux of solar radi- 
ation whjcli arrives at the speed of light 
tends to increase the ionization of the at- 
mospfiere and improve radio propagation 
for a few f><XJr$. So M. solar flgr^ is d mix^ 
b^e&sifiQ; for 0X9f3- TTie first f^w hours will 
be good radio op^Mtln^ times. Jn faci, 
sofTteof the best possible propa^tion oc- 
curs fust aftef ihe ofiset of a flara. But 
then ttie ne^t day or so «tteft ihe particle 
arrive: wipeoutt 



All df this Information Is packed Into a 
f^w words, sandwiched between the 
tones, ticks, and beeps of the regular 
WWW information. And I haven't even 
mentioned some of the other data avail- 
able from the WWV broadcasts, such as 
musical torses, stafidard audio frequerv 
cias, information on tiow fast tt>e Eart^ ts 
tMrnlr>g (U*tcn tor the ticks after ttie start 
of each minutellit and mc»ra^ 

the National Buroau of Standards and 
WWV provide a unique and useful s^vice 




Photo C. Ctose-up of the X-ray monitor screen showing a Ciass M soiar ffara at ahout 
W45Z. in a day or two. radio propagation wiff be affected by the charged partlcies from 
this (fare. 



to amateur-radio operators and others 
throughout the world at remarkably low 
cost to the taxpayer. Keep them in mind 
the ne)ci time someone starts talking 
about government waste and IneffEciency. 
And I wo\i\6 like to especially ttiank those 
NBS staffers and others wtio made my 
viiil to ttie wondrous WWV and (he 
[>00artmenl of Commerce Boulder latss sO 
Informative and enjoyat>le. John Miltqn, 
Chiet Engineer of WWV. Howard Machlan. 
WWV Engineer. Master Sergeant Harry 
Sorg, SESC staff, aruj especially Fred 



McGehan, Public Information Officer for 
Ihe NBS. 

Ttiafs it tor this month. Honi month 
well Q&t down to Bome nitty-gritty about 
propagation and how you can use all of 
this informal ion to Improve your OK suc- 
cess. Meanwhile, listen to WWV at 1B min- 
utes after lt>e hour, tune into t4t00. and 
log wtial you hear on that froq uaney. 
Voull be surpri&ed at what you hearl lit 
cover more on the Northern CaUfOtnla DX 
Foundation beacon netwodi in a futuf^ 
column. Good DX! 



REVIEW 



N2Ny HAM MASTERTAPES 

WeM, i knew It would flnaHy happen. 
These days Juat about anything you can 
Imagine Is showing up on videocassette. 
Movle&, Broadway showa, hard-core porn, 
mtrsicaEs, and tralnlng/lin struct ion on just 
about BVflirything from A as in apple grow- 
ing toZ as In the traininQ of zebras. It's all 
tfiare tor you to enjoy 11 you happen to own 
a fiome vldeocaasetle reorder and are 
willing to pay ttie price lor the software. 

Inevitably, the time would come when 
some enterpfising ham would ttiink {n 
terms of training prospective amateurs 
using this de¥alop{ng media. Last spring. 
whi^e visiting ttm east coast during tt^ 
pre-pfoductioa p(anning for '^Amateur Ra- 
dio's NewASt Front ief."^ 1 was invited by 
Larry Home N2tJV to be a guest on his ca- 
ble-TV program. It was then i learned that 
Larry had spent the better part of ttm past 
24 months planning Ihs product iOfi of an 
aINrvclusiva videotaped amateur-radio 
training program. 

Training nawcomefs Is nothing new to 
N2NY. He'^s been teaching amateur radio 
literally from the day he was first liqensed, 
32 years ago. HJs first graduates were his 
fellow grade^^Chooi students, ai\d N2NY 
ha& been going strong ever since. JHIs 
dream has always been that of making en- 
try into the fanks of the US Amateur Ser- 
vice available to anyone who has the in- 
terest. 

T^e release of tfie IHam MasterTapes 
training course by N2NY did pose one 
problem for publications such as this. 
Simply, neither 7;? nor any other amateur- 
radio periodicai had been put in the posi- 
tion of havirtg to review a videotape. 7$ 



was a bit luckier than the rest. They knew 
that one of thejf Associate Editors makes 
his living by "making television/* and 
that's how It came to pass that this writer 
fii^ds himsell producing a review on the 
N2IMY Ham MaaterTapes. 

The main question is whether or not the 
N2NY Ham ^^aslerTape^ are worth the 
$200 price tag. From my standpoint, the 
answer is in the affirmative, but (n the end 
only you can make that judgment- Oollar- 
wt&fl. they are an eKceHent investment for 
anyone planning to teach an amaieur-ra^ 
dio scf>ool of any sod tiecause Ihey take 
away ihe need of having to soflcit special- 
ize equipment usuaFty required for live 
<lemonjtratioris it also ^kies away witti 
tItoAe embarrassing moments wt>en a 
dermMi$tration either fatlft or backfires In 
a way thai nobody is expecting. A VHS or 
Beta home VCR arHJi a color TV s«t repEace 
the collection of ge^r tf>at ts usually nee 
essary for such classes, arvd the defnon- 
St rat ions work perfectly every time. 

I'm convirvceil that In his younger days, 
Larry was as addicted as I was to the NBC 
children's science program, '"Watch Mr. 
Wizard," «n his Ham MasterTapes, N2NY 
has utilised and expanded upon the tele- 
training methods developed— and still 
used by— television's teaching master, 
Don Herbert, the real Mr. Wizard. Those of 
you who were around during Mr. Wizard'a 
tenure on NBC wUI remember that each 
week Don would spend 30 minutes every 
Saturday afternoon leach in.g one of the 
local klda what he called "the rrkaglc of 
science in everyday living/' True, the local 
kid was a professional actor or actreisa, 
but the Idea waa that of educating by mak- 



ing feamlriig fun. That's enaetly th« 
method utilized by Larry Home in Ham 
MasleiTapee. 

Larry appears as much at home before 
a TV camera as he would tie if you met him 
on the street. The fact is that this is ac- 
tually the case After seve/at years of pro- 
ducing and hosting a weekly program, he 
has developed a very fafd-back style of his 
own. This style, along with his obvious 
dedication to what he is doing^ ranks him 
quite high en the list of educational televi- 
sion Instructors. His orvcamera presence 
h&lpB Counter the somewhat plastic parfor- 
mances of the others* which is about the 
onfy flaw in the entire production. 

Tt>ere are two methods of producing 
any fifm or videotape. One is Rehearse - 
Run^Thru - kehears<e/Tape - Air/Tape; tt^ 
Otfier ts Block and Shoot. Larry's decisioft 
was to use the lattef, and it a|ipeara to 
have been a wise rrKJ'w^ it meant thai an 
entire scrtpt did not need necessarily to 
be memocized at one time, and it perinl!> 
ted the use of prompting devices as urell. 

By using Slock and Shoot attention 
cou^d be given to each individual aspect 
ol itm overall presentation, pefmitting at- 
tention to be pa^ to minute detail, simple 
things, sucti as the way an array of tiand- 
held raijios was placed on the table belofv 
the tno «o that ttiey were clearly vtsibto on 
camera. Without several additional peo- 
ple to keep exact rK>tes, it is all but Impos- 
sible to use the eaftier method without 
matching shots using an additional VCR 
playback for the purpose. By going to 
Block and Shoot, each scene could be 
done Individually as many times as need* 
ad until Larry, as producer, was satisfied. 
The actual taping took five 1 0-hour work 
days. Again^ by way of comparison, your 
TV sitcom usually takes only 4 houns total 
to tapsi but at teast 7 days. . .sometimes 
204iour days of preparation and rehearsal. 

These days, it appears that a TV pro- 
gram is made or ttrokan in post -produc- 
tion, Thai's another word for ediltng, and 



It's become an eMacting science. Under 
Larry's personal s^jpefyisloa the program 
was edited by his director, Christopher 
Stola, a Ad the post -prod action phase Is 
orve of the high points. I say this baaed 
upon the mininral use of far-out special ef- 
fects that might tend to confuse the 
viewer. Larry and ChrFs used the KISS 
Principle (keep it simple, stupidi with 
scene-to-scene transitions being the 
traditional 'fade," and all transitions In a 
given segment being either straight cuts 
or Gut'lo-freeze-frame when a point nei&d- 
ed emphasis. 

In one place. Larry did get a bit liberal 
with his use of the treeze-f rarne^ but It was 
something truly speclacular. Evef dis- 
charge a capacitor and notice a spark? 
Moves by pretty fast, doesn't il7 Not In tt>e 
Nam MasterTapes- Using stolMnoiion 
freeze, the viewer is treated to a spectac* 
utir llreworks-lilce display as the capac- 
llor ts discharged in a fiery fury. Almost 
something akin to the effects in "Star 
Wars," txji not planned to be ttiai way. 

E'^mry important point covered is em- 
pnjLSrjEOd by on-scr^n "fonts/' La-, texts 
superimposed on the ficreen, such as the 
name of a reporter on a news program. 
Larry uses foftts liberally as a way of per- 
mitting itue viewer to take simpie notet 
during the segments and review each sub- 
ject after each of the 26 segments has 
been completed. 

Juat about everythEng you can think of 
{and some items you may not expect) are 
contai:ned in the N2NY Ham MasterTapeS. 
Larry does not 3tDp at giving the minimum 
amount of information needed to pasa an 
amateur examinatloi^. This is where most 
training courses end, leaving the student 
hung out to dry with a license and radio^ 
but no experience with either. The tradi- 
tions of amateur radio are rarely, If ever, 
ir^lud>ed in programmed training courses. 
The so^alled cheat books give only ques- 
tions and answers. Most courses simply 
teach the minimum r>ecessary to pass a 

73 Magazine • May, 1984 117 



test. Tb€ N2NY Ham MBatorTapos pick up 
wtiere overyone ffbo t^ves off. 

Uirry has totd this author quite t^ndidEy 
ttiat laarning hov^ to of>«rate various 
mo6ea and rlg^ l» Jmpcrftant* but so are 
proper ofvth&^Jr procadurefi. Tliera are 
also Ih-e traditions of the Amateur Radio 
Servicep ard ttiey are Included In 1t>e study 
course— thlriQfS like the tMst way lo corv 
fi\tc\ ofieseir on the air. enterirvg a OSO, 
arKt operatirvg a repeater- Even the way <fi 
whkch repeaters are coo^linatecl to their 
chaiin«{$ by vpluittary ex^ordknatioh courh 
ells IS explained, ar»d In oetaiL To put M 
concisely, everything ott^e* then CW is in- 
ctuOeO in the H2HY Ham MasierTepes 
Irmininy progiam, ankd that putt it rwad 
arut shouieiefs above just about anythirtg 
else on ttw marl^et. 

Aa you ail and waich tt^ie Ham lUaatar^ 
T«pe« sefles. one mnq oomes acnoea. 
Ttie people wtio put them lOQettier reaily 
c«rad abCHJt wtut they were doing. Quality 
of prottuction was obviously paranxxint 
to Lar(7 arid his crew, with cott of praduc- 
Ikm taking a back seei Tt>efe would be 



very little I would change If It had b^n my 
show, except perhaps to use professional 
actors m place of volunteer students. 
While this may seem to be a contradiction 
In tenn^, a? any good producer or director 
will leit you, the peopEe who harMJIe them- 
selves best arkd appear natural on camera 
are those who have been specifically 
trained for that task. Eacti ol us does one 
)ob best, and wt>en actors are called for* I 
believe in uaing them, TTiere's no subatl* 
tute for eKpef ^ence. 

I wofil tell you ttie best vray In which to 
u»e ttwfn, tMJt wt>ethef you purchase the 
tapes for youi personal use or lo augment 



a tralnlrvg class run by your club, they are 
definitely a worthwhile Investment. They 
have the ability to stand a^one or t>e Incor- 
porated into a structured training pro- 
gram— and that's another part of their 
beauty. Any time a technical subject is 
broached and where needed demonstra- 
tions are Included. Ijirry takes the lime to 
$top and explain what he means In sim- 
ple, easy4o^understand layman's terms. 
One thirtg is sum Your stuOertB won't get 
bored 

Ttie tapes are available on VHS and 
Beta forrnale at standard play speeds 
(Beta tl and VH&SP) so as lo be compati* 



WHATDOYOt; THINK? 

Have you recently purchased a new produci ihai has been reviewed tr* f3? if 
you have, write and tell us what you thmk atxjut it^ 73 will publish yourcommenis 
so you can share them with olher hams, as part of Our conilnuing etiom to bririg 
you tt>e best m new product mtonnation and reviews. Send your ihoughis tO- 
Revlew EditOf, 73: Amateur Rffdio s Tectimcsi Joumai Pe(ertx>rough NH 03458. 



ble with just about any home VCR DuplU 
eating quality is what one would expect, 
tieing several tape gervefatlons down ffO^ 
the original masters, but they're on a paf 
with most n^ovie rental tapes. I would 
strongly recommend using multiple 25' 
TV sets tor showinn to Earge groups. Avoid 
video projectors, as all hornet! deo sya- 
lems appear to become fairly grainy when 
used in conjunction with them. For ai- 
home viewing, any 13' to 25' TV set will 
suffice. 

At S199.95p the Set of tapes is not cheap, 
but It Is definitety a good InveatrBent If you 
are airiono thoae working toward 
streri0tt>enln9 the US Amateur Service tff 
bringing r>ew amateurs to IL 

Forfnore inlormation, write Lairy Hoftm 
N2Ny. Ham MssterTapes, 295 Par* Av9, 
South. New Yotk NY lOf^a Reftdar Ser- 
vice number 47B. 

Bill Paatematc WAifTF 

?IAasocia(e Editor 

Saugus CA 




LETTERS 



FATHER MORAH ARRIVES 






I need your help in putillshino tf^ fact 
that Faiher Moran 9NtMM is coming to 
Itte L75, arrlvrng SSfiternbar 4. This will be 
his 60th year as a Jesuit missionary. 

I mm in charge ot scheduling his trip all 
Over tfte US and I am IqoHIng for OX clubs 
in the larger cities who would tike tO have 
him for a guest for 2 or 3 daya. 

Send all inquiries and donations to me. 

Edward F. Konop W3WQS 

12$ Wei^ei Rd. 

PlttaburgNPAie20« 



EGO MISSPELLED 

I just read your ''Ego" editorial In the 
February issue of 73 and noted the »peli^ 
Ing error: It's spelled E-N-E-R-Q»Y. Your 
eubscriptiofKhuckIng critics are lealous 
of the energy that ^umps off the page at 
rm. 

I am at the moment earning radio 
mofiey es I write. I am a part-time secudty 
guard at ttm {lead heart ot what was once 
a huge restaurant empire. It's all being 
sold off. from semltraiier trucfvis i:^Qwn to 
Sanka— desks, pencils, n>eai massage rs, 
aJi ty^rtg in he*ps on ir>e once^busy ware- 
tiQiUse floor. It's like visiting the home of a 
recant widow, before she's cleared out all 
ine guy's stuff. What happened? Shon- 
sightedness. greed, and ;a;y fttinkingl 

Ofw hears of banltruptcies by Itie score 
fd out of 10 new buaimtait Quickly fail, i 
heairK and people woncler why anyom 
ipoukl even try lo start a rww tHtilness. Or 
a mapazina. As I ieafned from a buf^ ol 
soap salesmen, though, anything Is pO(SsW 
t>le — as long as yo4i get off your butt and 
go after It, ratttar tfun all In front of a TV 
arkd wait for somebody to throw success 
in youf lap. I'd Hke lo thank you for saying 
thie ssriM basic thing. You are hetptr^ riM 
keep a new leaf turned, to have goals Ir^ 
stead of whines. 

tnciiMied In my roufKla through the mori- 
bund Iffiperfai aul of Sambo's la their 



print shop full of Heidelberg presses, pa- 
per, a darkroom, etc. I started a collSQa 
newspaper with some other o^balls arid 
ran it for the two years I was tt^efe, bo the 
smells of ink^ developer, paper, and wax 
conjure forth some powerful rnemorles. 
As I remember what fun the whole pro- 
cess IS, from writing and paste-up to print* 
Ir^ and feedback, I realise that bcth you 
and youf niche are lucky to have fourKl 
each other. Keep having fun. I am with you 
ail Ir^ spirit. 

Anyhow, I en|oyed your magazine and 
editorial and thought Td write and feed 
your ego. Drat. Now I misspelled It, 

Lyie D. Gunderson 
Santa Barbara CA 



BITTERSWEET VICTORY 

I read with great interest the March Is- 
sue of 73. The diaries of those trying 10 
contact STS-9-W5LFL were very exciting 
to feed, even though few were successful. 

Unliice some other ham magazines, 73 
prints real -people experiences and brtnga 
us right into their ham shaci^s. 

I didn t think to write about my WSLFL 
'*contact'" bul It may be of some intsfest- 
A1 13:07Z on [>ecemt»f 6 (orbit 128} I used 
an Azclsn PCS-3000 borrowed from my 
neighbor next door, Ctiarlle f^wman 
KA4TRF, a 2-metef twme-brew quad 
(MHDV), and my Curtis Kfi4900 keyt>oar4 
set forie wpra I sent, *'W5LFL de W8SJQ 
Afl K^" to whic*i idurir»g my napeeting san^ 
eral limes) Ct>ai(ie came running in the 
front door (13:063 yelling. "You dW III 
Stop transmitting! He answered you— he 
said. "VWBSJO. t^ts is W5LFL in the space- 
craft. Ceiumbia, ackryowledgirig your OH 
caiV* And theri Charlie said he fadad 
away. 

I am fi ll ing It wsa a rattier bittersweet 
victory. Mot only because I per^dimlly 
didn't hear it, but also because my ''corv 
tact" (yet to tM conf imred— on this pass in 
this area— west central Florida — he 
wasn't heard answering anyone else) fe- 
suited in suafilciorv deniaJ, accusation of 
tabdc«tior\ dbbeliif, and aibenation of 



some formar hams who 1 ttioughl were 
tnerids. 

After ttw Sarasota newspaper (Nefs/^d 
Tribune, January 4, 1^34) printed my story. 
One pafticuiar "fr^erKT' was in a state of 
rago. To this day he hasn't spoken, I feel 
sorry that a facet of ham radio has be- 
Dome a source ot envy, Jeak>usy, and ar^ 
moaity. Instead of a eomradery which 
comes from mutuaii respect and admim^ 
tioo of each oJ our own personal acconn- 
ptishments. 

Most of the hams are very supportive 
and congenial to me stiiL Most feet as I 
do. . , It really is no big deal. . . they know 
the facts. Bul i wanted to write this lo per- 
haps bring up a point thai i doubt has 
been really considered. 

Personally, I'm bedfast most of the 
time, on oxygen, and ham radio (especlai- 
ly high speed CW) le really a great hobby 
tor me. I don't understand how we could 
have become so eompelltlve In our avoca- 
tion that the human element of fraternal 
eoclallzatlon Is being lost, 

Bany Q. Yodar WfiSJO 
Bradenton FL 33S2fi 



BIASED STORY 



Your extenaive coverage of the W5LFL 
DXpedltion in space (eaves me feeling 
that hams are trying to tell only the good 
part of the story. Oh. there were a few 
mentions of transmissions on the dowrv- 
link. ArKi Wayne Green passed off ttie neg- 
ative aspects of tt>e operation with three 
senlenoes, ending with, ''the usual crap- 

I do not wish to lake away from the slg- 
rttflc«nce of tills historic moment for otir 
hGiifyf^. bul I came away with a different 
perspective^ 

N^ver tn my experience has any ev»it 
been so well pulHtcized, The frequencies 
were publ I fitted far in advance in maga^ 
zirw after magazir^e. In ouf area. 2-metet 
repeater nets went over the game plan in 
agoni2if»g detail. Goddard and NoustoiY 
iMre on HF wiUi complete arid updated liv 
formation. And much morel 

Yet, m the Dallas Metropien area, you 
wpouEd think the wtiole thirtg came at30ut 
on the spur of the moment, One of ttw 
really good passes by W5LFL was clob- 
beted in pan t>y 'turtteys" on the downlir>k 
and ''policemen'' yelling at the turkeys, f 
understarkd it wia worse In nrany ott^er 
areas. The whole time Owen was In spttoa^ 
the conduct of hams in this area proved 



that maybe we need an inielligarK« test 
for hamt^ rattier th&n a an^ or tfwoiy 
test 

Hams had better ^t yspplr^) about 
what a great asset we wilt be In a "real 
efnergency." If we as a group cannot tian- 
dte a simple air4o^round commo exer- 
cise, witti everyttitng laid out for montlis 
in advarH^, what will wt dO If that "real 
emergericy" comas up? 

I am ashamed to play my tapes of 
Owen's transmissions to anyone outside 
the hobby. In a way, we are managing 
news, by tetiing aniy pan of the atory. Wa 
get real upset with the White House or 
CBS or Tfte New York Tim9S If they do 
that. 

Richard Q. Rhodea KHSIO 
Oatta* TK 



OVERKILL 



A ham operating from space Is certainly 
a great event In the history of amateur re^ 
dio and worthy of en article or two in any 
amateur^radlo publication. The 22 stories 
taking up 32 pages in the March 73 &eems 
a complete overkill. 22 oonaecutlva arth 
cies on how to Install PLJf59 connectors 
would be just as Interesting ar^l informa- 
tive. 

Bruce A. Wlike KBiUV 
Wapello tA 



[ 



ECLIPSE NET 



] 



A unique opfnrtuniry to aid the scienttf- 
ic community will occur on May 30 for 
hams In the southeastern and mid^Atleiv 
lie slates- On that date it>e moon will pass 
between the sun and Earth, caiialng a so^ 
lar eclipse visibte across portions of eight 
stales: Alabama, Georgia^ tJXiisiana^ Mary- 
land, Mississippi, l4orth Carollrta. $outh 
Carofina, and Virginia. 

Amateur-radio operators in these areas 
are needed to reiay current weathet mtor- 
matfon and predictions for two days prior 
to t\m event and to conduct proptOtUon 
experiments dyrir>g and after the ecllpaa 
Persons inierested in helpti>g out shouitf 
contact me. 



Joaa^ Rao 

Compu-Weattier, inc. 

PO &011122 

HUtNY 1t2S4 



118 73 Magazine • May. 1984 



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Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(^*^l|z eleetrof|icf 



"Ad parts may be nevy or 
&urplu£p and parts rriay b& 
substituted with comparable parts 
tl we are out of stock oi an item." 



120 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



■ 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 

LO and RF 0.2 to 300MH2 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 

Noise Figure (SSB) 

Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MH2 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 

WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. 

NF Min F=2GHz dB 2.4 Typ, 

F=3GHz dB 3.4 Typ. 

F=4GHz dB 4.3 Typ. 



NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 

MAG F=2GHz dB 12 Typ. 

dB 9 Typ. 
dB 6.5 Typ 



F=2GHz 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



$5.30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic^lOma. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic SOrna. Pt. 250mw 



U^ELCO RF Fewer and Linear Amp 


ilifier 


Capacitors 


F Power and Linear 




These are the famous capacitors tised 


by 


all the R 


Au^lifier 


manufacturers, and describee, in the RF Jiata Book. 








5pf lOpf 18pf 


30pf 




43pf 


lOOpf 


200pf 


1 to lOpcs. $1.00 


S.lpf 12pf 22pf 


32pf 




51pf 


llOpf 


220pf 


11 to 50pcs. $ .90 


6.8pf 13pf 25pf 


33pf 




60pf 


120pf 


470pf 51 up pes. $ .80 


7pf Upf 27pf 


34pf 




BOpf 


130pf 


500pf 




8.2pf 15pf 27.5pf 


AOpf 




82pf 


140pf 


lOOOpf 


h 


NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL 


DIODES 










1S2200 ^^-^° 








MODEL ] 


LS2199 




Peak Pt. Current ma. 


rp 




9min. ] 


LOTyp. llr 


nax. 


9m1n. lOTyp. Umax. 


Valley Pt. Current ma. 


Iv 




1.2Typ. 


l.Smax. 




l,2Typ. LSmax, 


Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 


Vp 




95Typ. 


120max. 




75Typ- 90max, 


Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. 


Vpp Vf 


= Ip 


480fflin. 


550Typ. 


630max. 


440iinin, 520Typ. 600max 


Series Res. Ohms 


rS 




2.5Typ. 


4max. 




2Typ. 3max> 


Terminal Cap. pf. 


Ct 




1.7Typ. 


2max. 




5Typ. 8max, 


Valley Pt. Voltage mv. 


VV 




370Typ. 






350Typ. 



ea 
ea 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

^ — ^ — ^ > , — — — , 

Input Impedance 10 meg*. Input Capacity 6,5 to 12pf.5 Division Ratio (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz, 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45,00 

M i^-^^^— . m 1 -L^ - u ■ r T ■ r » . . , _ _ . , ,„^^^^^^^^^^ 

MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 

Listsall Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



For intormation call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



(f\f ^^t^ electroi|ics 



"All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparable parts 
if we are out of stock of an »tern/' 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 121 




RF TRANSISTORS. MICROWAVE DIODES 



TVPE 



PKICE 



lYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TSfPE 



PRICE 



2NX561 


$ 25.00 


2N1562 


25.00 


2.N1B92 


25.00 


2^^2957 


1.5S 


2N2857JAKTX 


4-10 


2N2&i7JAKT>:V 


4.10 


2N2876 


13.50 


2N2&47 


18.35 


2^f2^48 


13,00 


2N2349 


15.50 


2N3375 


17.10 


2N3553 


1.55 


2N3632 


15.50 


3N3733 


11.00 


2N3818 


5.00 


2N3866 


1.30 


2M3866JAN 


2,20 


2N3924 


3.35 


aN392? 


17.25 


2N3950 


35.00 


2N4012 


11.00 


2^041 


14.00 


2N4072 


1-80 


aN4080 


4.53 


2N4127 


21.00 


2N4427 


1.30 


2M438 


1-.S5 


2M430 


11,80 


2M957 


3.45 


2N49.^9 


2,30 


2N509O 


13,80 


3J©10f? 


3.45 


2^5109 


1.70 


2M>ieo 


3.45 


2N5177 


21. 62 


2S&179 


1.04 


2J^5216 


56.00 


2N5Gfi3 


3.45 


2N55g9 


9.77 


2W5590 


10.92 


2N5501 


13,80 


2N5637 


15.50 


2f?5641 


12.42 


2N5642 


14.03 


2N5^3 


15.50 


2N5645 


13.80 


2N5646 


20.70 


2N5651 


11.05 


2M5691 


18.00 


3N&764 


27.00 


2M5836 


3.45 


2N5S42/XW1607 


8.45 


2N5849 


20.00 


2N5913 


3,25 


2N5916 


36.00 


2N5922 


10.00 


2H5923 


25.00 


2N5941 


23.00 


2N5£^2 


40.00 


2N5944 


10.35 


2K5945 


11.50 


2N5946 


14.40 


2^)6080 


10.35 


2N6081 


12.07 


2N6062 


12.65 


2N60a3 


13.25 


2tJ60S4 


15.00 


2N0O^ 


11,00 


2N6095 


12.00 


:iN6096 


16,10 


2NSCK)7 


20.70 


SW®105 


21.00 


2N6136 


21.85 


2N6l6e 


40.24 


3Ne201 


50,00 


2Ne3CM 


1.50 


2^'645^ 


18,00 


2iN6567 


10.06 


2f;6680 


80.00 


2SC703 


3.00 


2SC756A 


7.50 


2SC781 


2.80 


2SC101S 


l.OO 


2SC1042 


12.00 


23C1070 


2.50 


23C1239 


2.50 


2SC1251 


12,00 


2a:i306 


2,90 


2SC1307 


5.50 


2SC1424 


2.80 



29(11678 $ 


2.00 


M1134 1 10.90 


MSC1831-3 


¥135.00 


2SC1729 


20.00 


i©579 


7.95 


M3Cia21-lO 


225.00 


39C1760 


1.50 


M9588 


7,50 


hii^y.QOi 


40.00 


2aCL909 


4,00 


M962.i^ 


7.95 


MSC2223-10 


200.00 


2SC1946 


3«>,00 




9.95 


USC3000 


50.00 


2SC1946A 


40.00 


M9624 


11.95 


M3C3001 


50.00 


3SC1970 


2.50 


M9625 


17.95 


M8C7:i001 


50,00 


2SC1974 


4.00 


M.g630 


18.00 


MSC82001 


40.00 


2SC2lfT6 


5.50 


M974a 


29.90 


M£5CB20i4 


40. OD 


2SC2237 


32.00 


M9741 


29,90 


MSC83020 


40.00 


2SC2S95 


47.00 


M97&5 


19,50 


iisas2030 


40.00 


A50-12 


25.00 


M984^ 


37.00 


M9CB3Q01 


50.00 


A209 


10.00 


ftt9850 


16.90 


MSC8300S 


100,00 


A283 


5.00 


M9e51 


20.00 


Mrr4i50 


14.40 


A283B 


6.00 


M9887 


5.25 


Wibl20 


PUR 


AF102 


2.50 


MEL80091 


25.00 


»Cr5596/2N5590 


99.00 


AFY12 


2.50 


MM1550 


10.00 


*ri'5768/2M5768 


95,00 


fiF272A 


2.50 


MM1552 


50.00 


Wl^*762 


RK 


BF92T 


2.50 


1M1553 


50.00 


mmi36 


2,50 


Hvmo 


1.00 


U^614 


10,00 


KE13783 


PCfi 


Wl^l 


1.65 


mil943/2N4072 


1.80 


Ni-iilSSS 


PQft 


bi}W9 


2,50 


MM2608 


5,00 


NT';'=V7835 


5.70 


WllS 


2.50 


fem3375A 


17.10 


NE;73436 


3.50 


Hf^im 


2,50 


MW4429 


10.00 


'iW( 




RFW17 


2.50 


HM8000 


1,15 


PK1K637 


JJOK 


BF"^^ 


1.50 


MM8006 


2.30 


P13190 


POR 


RFK44 


2,50 


MMSOll 


25.00 


prji^^ 


POR 


BFS4S 


2.50 


MPi^l02 


.45 


P'ni95 


POfi 


EfKes 


2.50 


ifpsoai 


1.01 


1^13537 


7.80 


FIFXB4 


2,50 


MRA2023-1.5 


43.50 


PT4166E 


POR 


Bt^XBS 


2.50 


MEU'-JOS 


16.10 


1^141760 


PCH 


HFX86 


2. SO 


MEiF212 


16,10 


PT4186B 


POR 


HFX89 


1,00 


mF223 


13.25 


P14209 


POR 


HEYll 


2.50 


MHF224 


15,50 


Fr4^0^/5645 


POIt 


r^FYig 


2.50 


MRt"231 


10.92 


Pr4556 


24.60 


BF¥19 


43.50 


MRF233 


12.07 


PT4570 


7.50 


B£Y39 


2.50 


MRF"233 


12.65 


iJ'i'4577 


POR 


BFYSO 


1.00 


UEiF^iS? 


3.15 


n4590 


POP 


RrXfl7 


15,34 


MHF238 


13.80 


PT4^^?. 


POR 


RTMEiSCS 


15.34 


MRt239 


17.25 


PT462B 


POR 


BT.yc)3C3 


2?,. 21 


MRFa45 


35.65 


Fr4640 


lOR 


BL.Y87A 


8.94 


MHF247 


35.65 


P14642 


POR 


fflYS8C3 


13.08 


B/5RF304 


43.45 


PT5632 


4.70 


BLY94G 


21.30 


MHF3Q9 


33.81 


Pl*>749 


POR 


BLY351 


10.00 


mF3l4 


28,52 


Pl^29 


POR 


PT,Y568C/GF 


30.00 


MRF315 


28.86 


PT6709 


POR 


G458-617 


25.00 


MHF316 


POR 


PrS720 


PUK 


C4005 


20.00 


AtRP317 


63.94 


Fi«510 


POB 


CD1B99 


20,00 


mF420 


20.00 


P^524 


POR 


me 188 


18,00 


mF421 


36,80 


Pila609 


POR 


aS545 


'?,^.Q0 


MElf^'3£2A 


41.40 


Pi«e33 


PCR 


Cli;3005 


100.00 


^?RF427 


17.25 


Fi'yesg 


POR 


Dexcei GeAs FErr 




MRF42a 


46.00 


PTR659 


PQR 


DKI^501A-P100F 


49.30 


MHt^433 


12.07 


F1^79 


POR 


Ryitsu GaAs FET 




MHF449/A 


12.65 


PTS708 


POR 


ESX52WF 


58.00 


MRF450/A 


14,37 


PTS709 


POR 


GM0290A 


2.50 


MHf453/A 


18.40 


PT8727 


29.00 


HKP76 


4.95 


MRF454/A 


20.12 


PT8731 


PUR 


H1JPS3002 


11.40 


mfM5S/A 


16.00 


PIB742 


19,10 


HfciPSSOOS 


30,00 


MRF458 


20.70 


PT8787 


POR 


1#PS3005 


10,00 


MEIF463 


25,00 


fTS783 


16.50 


HEPSSOO© 


19.90 


MEIF4V2 


1.00 


Fiy784 


32.70 


HLPS3007 


25.00 


MRF475 


3,10 


p-iwyo 


56.00 


HFPSSOIO 


11.34 


MRF476 


2.00 


Fi:il962 


POR 


^PdwlPtt Psir'knT^ 


112.00 


MH]?477 
MHF492 


14.95 
23.00 


Fril963 

rrjioss 


PQR 


HFEI2204 


POR 


3582 IK 


38.00 


MHIi'502 


i.m 


PES6680 


PCM 


35S26B 


32.00 


l!fflF503 


6.00 


WA 




35S26E 


32.00 


MRF504 


7.00 


400S1 


5.00 


35831 K-Hai 


30.00 


MRF509 


5.00 


40279 


10.00 


35831 R 


30,00 


MRFbll 


10,69 


402BO 


4.62 


a5S32E 


50.00 


MRF515 


2.00 


40281 


10.00 


35833E 


50.00 


MRI^17 


2.00 


40282 


20,00 


35R^:{K 


71.50 


Mm'b59 


2.05 


40290 


2.80 


358&4E 


75.00 


MRFB05 


20.00 


40392 


13.05 


35866E 


44,00 


MEE161S 


25.00 


40294 


2.50 


ffirili3l01 


7.00 


Mm^28: 


8,65 


40341 


31.00 


H)aE3J02 


8,75 


M11EB29 


3.45 


40608 


2,48 


IIXTR51W 


30.00 


MRJ?\J44 


27.60 


408<M 


1.00 


H3ai^l04 


68.00 


mh'G46 


29.90 


40977 


10.00 


HXUli6105 


31.00 


MH£B16 


15.00 


62800A 


60.00 


ICCIT*6106 


33.00 


MRF823 


20.00 


RE3754 


25.00 


J310 


.70 


MHF901 (3) iRad 


1.00 


RK3789 


25.00 


-mw 




MRtyOl (4) lead 


2.00 


RHIO 


25.00 


JOKOOO 


10.00 


vsM9(yi 


2.30 


S50-12 


23.00 


jceooi 


25.00 


MRi-^ll 


3.00 


S30Q6 


5.00 


JO4045 


25.00' 


kRi-'^i 


3,30 


S3031 


5.00 


^Sc»to^ola Cofm. 




MKFS004 


2.10 


SCA3522 


5.00 


H1131 


8.50 


MS261F 


HJi 


SCA3523 


5,00 


6^1132 


11.95 


M3C1720-12 


225,00 


PRICE m raax^ 


isrr = POR 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



"All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may toe 

substituted with comparabf^ parts 
ff we are out of stock of an itemJ' 

For information call: (602) 242-3037 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 

^/i^l\x elect roi|ic$ 



122 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



GaAs, TUNNEL DIODES, ETC. 



* B 



lc.tS5l^nBS • 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TJCUSCK CSF 




SD345 


$ 5,00 


5t>l45 


5,00 


smoofl 


15,0(1 


BniOfB 


IB^QO 


a>ioo&-2 


1S,00 


SII012 


s,m 


mimz-3 


B.Bd 


afl012-^5 


9,m 


a)ioi3r*3 


13.50 


a>1013^7 


0,50 


^1014 


U,00 


SD1Q14-6 


11,00 


SP1016 


15.00 


3)10X6-5 


13.00 


SDlOlB-4 


1S.0CI 


SDlOld^ 


15*00 


a>ioia-7 


l&.OO 


SLH01S^15 


15.00 


SDlO£(>-5 


10*00 


SD1Q2S 


ts.oo 


SDaO*)-2 


12.00 


SD1D43 


12,00 


SD1Q43"! 


10.00 


SD1D45 


3.7& 


SDlOl^l 


2.00 


SLI10S3 


4,00 


SD1065 


4,75 


S3i06a 


15.00 


SEil074-2 


IB. 00 


SD1074-4 


2B.00 


SD1074-5 


2S.00 


SDlCnS 


20,00 


201077-4 


4,00 


311077-6 


4,00 


smm^ 


34.00 


SDiflefr^ 


6.00 


aj]j06O-9 


3.00 


SDtlBI 


B.OO 


siioer 


15.00 


SDWBB-^ 


15.00 


mme& 


1^.00 


amoo 


5.00 


SD1109 


IS.OO 


ailll5-2 


d>oo 


Sm 115-3 


a, 00 


a>iii5-7 


2.50 


smaie 


5.00 


SJiiis 


22,00 



TYH^ 


PRICE 


TYI^ 


snii9 


S5,00 


ail278-5 


SD1124 


50,00 


snasi-2 


SD1127 


3.50 




S&1I33 


14.00 


3n280-l 


sc»ii3:^i 


14.00 


371290-4 


sn 134-1 


3.00 


3n290-7 


SD1135 


8.00 


3^300 


SD113g 


1S.00 


3)1301*7 


ail 136-2 


15.00 


311305 


SD1143-1 


12.00 


3^1307 


SDU43-3 


17.00 


SDISOS 


am44-i 


3,00 


aotoii 


SDU4B 


15,00 


a>i3i7 


331147 


15,00 


a>1336 


s>nm 


10.00 


Sm345MB 


SBU89 


24.00 


S>1 365-1 


331200 


1.50 


SD1365-5 


3H201-2 


10.00 


SD1375 


331202 


10.00 


33137^6 


a)12 12-11 


4.00 


301379 


SD 12 12-12 


4.00 


sDiaso^i 


501212-16 


4,00 


SDX380-3 


SD1214-7 


5,00 


SD1380-7 


SD1214-11 


5.00 


aDl405 


SD12ie 


12.00 


331403 


SD1213-4 


15.00 


gDl'llO 


SD 1219-5 


15.00 


aDl4lO-3 


3m2l9-S 


15.00 


SDI413-1 


3D 1220 


8.0O 


SD1416 


a31220-9 


6,00 


SD1422-2 


371222-8 


16.00 


3>1428 


m\??:?^n 


7.50 


3)1429^3 


3n224r-lD 


la.oo 


3?142^3 


30225 


IB. 00 


SO1420-5 


3n22a-€ 


PCR 


SD!1430 


fS11??<K7 


13-00 


011430-2 


a}1229-lfi 


13,00 


SDl43t-5 


a>1232 


4.00 


aU434-9 


3)1240-« 


15.00 


3^438 


ail244-l 


14.00 


a?i44i 


snsEz 


12.00 


3)1442 


Sa263 


15.00 


3a444 


^J12S3-1 


15.00 


3)1444-8 


aa272 


13«00 


3^450^1 


aDEl272-2 


15.00 


331451 


aJl272-4 


IS, 00 


SD1451-2 


3J127B 


^.00 


3)1453 


ajl27Br^l 


1A.0Q 


371452-2 



TfPl 



51B,.00 

8.00 

10.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3,00 

3.00 

3.00 

1.00 

10.00 

3.00 

5.00 

2.50 

£.50 

7. 50 

7.50 

15.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

40.00 

18.00 

22.00 

21.00 

IS, 00 

SO, 00 

24,00 

33.00 

15.00 

15.00 

15,00 

12,00 

18,00 

30.00 

30,00 

26,00 

SI. 00 

IS, 00 

s.oo 

6,00 
28,00 
IB. 00 
IB.OQ 
20,00 
20.00 

*♦ C^ Cross fteferenoe Hast 8P Tlrain&ifiUir^i, HLodss, H*rid UDdLilL-^ And Any Other T^ije Of S^micundLK^lor. 

* PtCXgg (lior PUiRTHI,HIQOfAVE,PIN,aC3iJnT9\Tl.^'>aX.VAIW7nJR.Gl^ * 



HUCE 



sm4^^t 


$48,00 


SD14^-1 


48,00 


3J1477 


48.00 


3n47S 


ai.oo 


aa40o 


60.00 


3^481 


1,50 


3)14B4«5 


1,50 


311481^ 


1,50 


3n484-7 


1,50 


3>14S8 


39.00 


3H4S8-1 


28.00 


311488-7 


27.00 


3)1488-8 


28.00 


ajH9&-i 


30.00 


3)1520-2 


IS.OO 


3>l 522-4 


33.00 


an538*l 


24.00 


SD1528*3 


34,00 


^1530-2 


3a. 00 


331535-1 


43.00 


301545 


34.00 


3)1361 


73.00 


SF4557 »[it* 


25.00 


SKTiO^a miA 


5.00 


SK3177 KjCA 


15.00 


3137714 fcbt. 


2.50 


SRf750 te>t. 


36,00 


SKTlOie ttit. 


5.00 


SRfillT Mot. 


22.00 


Sttf^235U lk>t. 


38.00 


3tF2378 Jtot. 


18.00 


SRF25B4 Stot. 


4O.Q0 


SKF2»21 »fc>t. 


25.00 


^12857 Mau 


20,00 


rmam flc* 


15.00 


T!Sl8B/18tF9e6 


3.55 


TP312 


2.50 


1P1014 Wt 


5.00 


WlGSBTa 


13.00 


01-80703104/ 




458-d1& tbt.CbsD 


. 65-00 


1XVI>2201 K,P. 


450,00 


d^dOs W^ 


100.00 


rA720b/2Sifeai 


80.00 


TA7487/2!S920 


75,00 


'ra7Sg&/2H5267 


150.00 


£812092 Hot. 


18,00 


IfiRTO 


8,0& 



pa »»»*<:*** «*♦* 



IICl 


$ 3,40 


DGID 


4.00 


1N21«E 


5,80 


11^38 


3.40 


mtmn 


4.00 


wssm 


10. DO 


1N7S 


26.00 


nnm 


26,00 


l^n49 


6.00 


1M15G 


15.00 


1N831 


10.00 


UE930 


15.00 


m3713 


18.00 


120717 


14.00 


1M3747 


21,00 


1IH812B 


9,00 


1N5142A/6 


4.2S 


1N5146A/B 


4.2S 


Ufi453 


3.7S 


1^713 


5.00 


152200 


15.00 


A2Xlia( Aertech 


50,00 


BUfil Bxmi: 


5,00 


m233BMpta 


pm 


IGMTC Alp4ia 


POR 


1198158^38 Alpha 


POR 


0^681-^89 C^ 


ai,35 


0C2542^-I6 OS 


37.40 


iP50a2-0112 


14.20 


tP50e2-O375 


POR 


HP5oe2'ia^ 


ten 


3!50@-23l» 


5.30 


MP60e2-2800 


1.00 


HPSOes-30^ 


6.70 


1IP5082-3379 


1.50 


lff'5082-8016 


Km 


MA475 


put 


M/yi7GG 


POR 


MA43K16 


POR 


M47100 


3.05 


WAi7S5(2 


POR 



IMIB 


$ 3.40 


lPf4im 


$ 3.40 


tSQlC 


$ 3.40 


VGUM 


4.00 


IKiini 


6.00 


11«21AP 


5,00 


IN211G 


5.80 


1N22 


5.00 


UG^ 


10.00 


1M23C 


3.40 


1N23CH 


3.40 


1^30 


4.95 


1>E3||E 


5,00 


wias 


7.50 


IN25AH 


18.00 


UCQ 


10.00 


IN32 


50,00 


tNr>3A 


55.50 


1H76R 


28*00 


LM7a 


26.00 


JJV7UA 


20.00 


tmm 


28.00 


lM7aDR 


28,00 


1N78R 


28.00 


imsoMR 


18.00 


^.^f■u5 


4.00 


1N415C 


4.00 


LN416D 


5.00 


iN-nei; 


6,00 


11^8 


10.00 


UiB33 


10.00 


1M550 


4.00 


imofii 


2.00 


lFeg32 


IS.OO 


1^43540 


15.00 


umn 


11.00 


1113714 


11,00 


1N3715 


16,00 


1J«3718 


10. OO 


lN37f& 


10,00 


1S3731 


14,00 


110733 


10.00 


1N4386 


20,00 


llM38e 


15,00 


UM7B5 


u.oo 


1N5139A/B 


4.25 


1N9140A/B 


4.25 


LM&141A/B 


4.^ 


1(6143A/B 


4.25 


1N5144A/B 


4.25 


uei45A/e 


4,25 


IIB147A/B 


4.25 


11G14SA/6 


4.25 


11G187 


5,50 


1I&I65 


7.^ 


uern 


1.00 


L*&711 JAN 


2,00 


116167 


2.00 


tm263 


1. 00 


132188 


15.00 


182206/9 


1.00 


881087/4888^558 


85.00 


SDQQBU 


65,00 


miOSB 


1.00 


ffilOSG 


LOO 


aM/4J¥9M G.E. 


15.00 


CaD&14AB C.U, 


pm 


D40G0 Alpba 


POR 


mtm Mpbm 


FCE 


DI90O Alplia 


POR 


DI96e Alfdm 


PQi 


DldBTU Alpta. 


¥VR 


I36147D Alpa 


Wtt 


IE603 Alpha 


PGR 


0660b AlptK 


FCH 


HfWrtfr* Alpba 


FGR 


[1C6460A A^lpiu 


PCK 


fira0054 Cnnt 


PCB 


C3C1602-89 OE 


31,35 


00607^0 OE 


31.35 


0C2531^88 Cnz 


37.40 


QC3308-40 t^ 


37.40 


OQTOM (im 


50.00 


V33B44A-CCI1 


12S.00 


m'^o&i-wAi 


75.m 


a«0G2-a2S3 


106.00 


Wi^Cj^-Q^SO 


53,00 


jspsasz-amB 


pot 


00082-0401 


PCS 


W^0e2<O438 


PGR 


HP50a2-1332 


PGR 


lff5082-2254 


pen 


HP5OB2-230e 


10.710 


llP50a2-26aB 


JOR 


115082-2711 


23.15 


HP5082-2727 


POR 


llF90a2-2805 


4.45 


HP5082*^35 


I.OO 


HPQQ82'2884 


POR 


Ii'S0e2-3CW0 


36,00 


HP5OB2-30ea 


2,00 


|ff>S082-31S8 


1.00 


IF50B2-&I^ 


lOR 


f«i5082^^64S2 
K3A Itemtn:*! 


POR 

7.00 




PPR 


liP50a2-&323 


POR 


»A450A^ 


UMODOS 


POR 


iW414a7 


POR 


IM41765 


POR 


MA4300^ 


48.00 


M*^i:i589 


POR 


^W 131522 


PCR 


UA45104 


27.00 


^lAI 70-14 


POR 


MA'l70r>l 


25.50 


MA47202 


30.80 


MA-17771 


POR 


m 17838* 


POR 


>iiA4Sl06 


37.95 


MA4&55S 


IX3R 


JHA86731 


125,00 



I 



• CUR ^lUCK OKfCES DAILY SO CALX IF IF THE PART VOt) NEED IS NOT LIS3TJD ••••**»*»•,.*.*»**«♦*.,»•«,»*....•*,•••*».*»*,•»,. 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



All parts tnAy be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparatile parts 
H WQ are out of stock of an item." 



^^^i\x electronics 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine * May, 1984 123 




I [ 



COAXIAL RKLAV SWITCHES SPDT 



Electronic Specialty Co. /Raven ElectranlcB 
Part ff 2 5N28 Part tf SU--01 

26Vdc Type N Coni^ector, DC to 1 GHz. 



FSN 5985-556-9681 



$49.00 





Aatphenol. 

Part I 316-10102-8 

115Vac Type mC DC to 3 GHz. 



$29,99 



FXg. 

Part # 300-11182 

laoVac Type BNC DC to 4 GHz 

FSN 5985*543-1225 

$39.99 




FXR 

Part I 300-11173 
120Vac Type BHC Saw 
FSN 5985^5^^3-1850 

?39.99 



*i 



1 





HNC To Banana Plug Coax Cable RG-58 36 inch or BWC to H Ceax Cable RG-5S 36 inch. 



S7.99 or 2 For $13*99 or 10 For $50.00 



$a.99 or 2 For $15.99 or 10 For $60.00 





SOLID STAT£ RELAYS 

P&B Model ECT1DB72 
PRICE EACH $5.00 

Dlglstg, Inc. Hodt&l ECS ^2 15 
PRICE EACH S7.50 

Grigsby/Bartoti Model GB74O0 
PRICE EACH $7.50 



5v€lc tarn on 



5vdc turn on 



5vdc turn oo 



120vac contact at 7a»ps or ZOamps on a 
I0*'x lO'Vx * 124 aluminum. Heat^ink with 
silicon grease. 

240vflc contact 14aaps or 40asips on a 
10"x 10*'x .124 aluAinua. Haatslnk with 
silicon greaae^ 

240vac contact at 13a[EpB or 40anps cm a 
\0"% 10**x .124 slumlnuB. Heatslnk i^lth 
silicon grease* 



NOTE^ *** Ite&s may be substituted vith other brands or ^equivalent Aodsl numbers. '*^^* 



qM^ 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 



elect roqic;ii 



"AM parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comp>;9rable parts 
if we are out at siock of an item." 




Ton Fra* Numbar 
800 528-0160 
(For ordf ft only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



124 73 Magazine • May, 1934 



RECALL PHONE MEMORY TELEPHONE WITH 24 NUTfflER AUTO DIALER 

The Recall Phone Telephone employs the latest state of art 
communications technology.lt %& a combination telephone 
and automatic dialer that uses premium-quality ^ solid-state 
circuitry to assure high-reliability performance in personal 
or business applicatlonB. $49,99 




AROH ALPHA RAPID BQMDING GLUE 

Supet Glue ^CE'-ASe high strength 
rapid bonding adhesive, Alpha 
Cyanoacrylate. Set-Time 20 to 40 
sec* tOi 7fl*oz* C20gTn. ) 

$2,00 




■S5r«W 



TOUCH TONE PAD 

This pad contains all the electronics to 
produce standard touch- tone tones* New 
with data. 




9 



> 




$9.99 or 10/$89.99 



MITSUMI UHF/VHF VARACTOR TUNER MODEL UVEIA 

Perfect for those unscrambler projects* 
New with data* 




$19.99 or 10/$149>g9 



INTEGRATED CIRCUIT, 



MCI 372? 

MC135SP 

MCn30P 

MCl330AiP 

MCI310P 

MC1496P 

LM565N 

LM380NU 

LM1889N 

ME564M 

NE561N 



Color TV Vid^o Modulator Circuit. 

IP Amp. jLimiter,PM Detector , Audio Driver, Electronic Attenuator 

IF Amplifier 

Low Level Video Detector 

FM Stereo Demodulator 

Balanced Modulator/Demodulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

2Watt Audio Power Amplifier 

TV Video Modulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

Phase Locked Loop 



1 to 10 


llup 


4.42 


S2.95 


5,00 


4,00 


1.50 


1.25 


1.50 


1 , 15 


4,29 


3.30 


1.50 


1.25 


2. m 


2.00 


1 . 56 


1.25 


5.00 


4.00 


10.00 


8.00 


10,00 


8,00 



FERRANTI ELECTRONICS AM RADIO RECEIVER MODEL ZK414 INTEGRATED CIRCUIT. 
Features : 

1*2 to 1.& volt operating range, , Less than 0. 5ma current consmnption, i50KHz to 3Ktlz 
Frequency range, , Easy to assemble, no alignment necessary. Effective and variable AGC action,, 
Will drive an earphone direct. Excellent audio quality ,, Typical power gain of 72dB. ,T0-1S 
package, With data. S2.99 or 10 For $24,99 



HI CAD RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES 

AA Battery Pack of € These are Factory 
New* $5*00 

SUB C Pack of 10 2.5Amp/Hr. $10,00 

Gates Rechargeable Battery Packs 



12vdc at 2.5Amp/Hr, 
12vdc at 5Ainp/Hr, 



$11,99 
$15.99 




(§\I<^I^ electroi|ics 



'*AII parts may be new or 
surpfus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparable parts 
if we are ouL of stocK of an item." 



MOTOROLA MRF559 RF TfWJSISTOR 

hfe 3Cniin 90typ 200ni]x. 

ft 3C]0antiz 

gain 8db min 9.5typ at SZOntiz 

13db typ at 5I2Ttiz 
output power .5watts at 12.5vclc 
at SZOntiz. 

$2.05 or 10/$I5.aO 



For information call: (602) 242-3037 

Toll Free Number 
600-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 125 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAG TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SKI 10 

SK300A 

SK40a 

SK406 

SK416 

SK500 

SK600 

SK602 

SK606 

SK607 

SK610 

SK620 

SK626 

SK630 

SK636B 

SK640 

SK,&46 

SK700 

SK711A 

SK740 

SO 70 

SK800A 

SK806 

SK310 

SK900 

SK906 

SK1420 

SK1490 



Socket 

Socket For 4CX5O00A.R, J, 4CX10,O00D, 4CXI5,OOOA,J 

Socket Fox 4-125Aj250A,AOOA,400C,4PRi25A,400A,4-500A, 5-500A 

Chimney For 4-250A,400A,400C,4PR400A 

Chimney For 3-400Z 

Socket Fox 4-1000A/4PR1000A/B 

Socket For 4CX250B.BC,FG,R,4CX350A,F ,FJ 

Socket For 4CX250B ,BC,FG,R, 4CX350A,F.FJ 

Chimney For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R,4CX350A,F»FJ 

Sooket For 4CX60OJ,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CXe00J,JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Cbimiey For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

ChiiMiey For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX300A.Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C.F 

Socket For 4GX30{}A,Y,4CX125C ,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,y ,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Chimney For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Socket For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Socket For 4X500A 

Chimney For 4X500A 

Socket For 5GX3000A 

Socket For 4CV8O0OA 



$POR 
$520.00 
260.00 
74.00 
36.00 
390.00 
51.00 
73.00 
11.00 
60*00 
60.00 
66.00 
10.00 
66,00 
34 . 00 
36.00 
71.00 
225.00: 
225.00 
86.00 
86.00 
223.00 
40.00 
225.00 
300.00 
57,00 
650.00 
585.00 



JOHNSON TUBE SOCKETS AND CHUIKEYS 



124-1 11/ SK606 
122^0275-001 

124-0U3-00 
124-1 16/SK630A 
l24-115>-2/SK620A 



Chimney For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R. 4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 3-500Z, 4-1 2 5A, 250A, 400A, 4-500A, 5-5O0A 

Capacitor Ring 

Socket For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 

ai3 Tube Socket 



$ 10.00 
(pair)i5.00 
15,00 
55.00 
55*00 
20.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

,8pf 
pf 

Ipf 
4pf 



Z 
1 
3 
3 
3 
4 
5 
6 
8 



5pf 
8pf 
2pf 
7pf 
3pf 
6pf 
9pf 
7pf 
6pf 
8pf 
2pf 



PRICES: 



I to 10 - 

II to 50 ' 

51 to 100 



lOpf 
I2pf 

15pf 

lepf 

20pf 
22pf 
24pf 

27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47 pf 
51pf 
56pf 
6Bpf 
S2pf 

Mi 
.90^ 

.sot 



lOOpf* 

llOpf 

120pf 

I30pf 

I50pf 

160pf 

ISOpf 

ZOOpf 

220pf* 

240pf 

270pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



430pf 
47Qpf 
SlOpf 

560pf 

620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

1000pf/,001uf* 

180Opf/.0Q13uf 

2700pf/.0027uf 

10,000pf/.01uf 

12,000pf/.0l2uf 

I5,000pf/.015uf 

ie,ooopf/.oi8uf 



101 to 1000 ,60<t 
1001 & UP ,35it 



* IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 10 for $7.50 

. 100 for $65,00 
1000 for S350,00 



WATKIMS J0HN5QIN yjJ-V9Q7: Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator 



$110.00 



Frequency range 3,6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput, Hin. lOdBm typical, SdBm Guarantee<i, 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nfo), min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Harmonic, min, 
60dB typical. Residual FH, pk to pk. Max. 5KHz, pushing factor. Max* 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
{l,5rl VSWR), Haj(. 60MHz. Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts. Tuning current. Max* *0*lrTiA, 
modulation sensitivity range, Max. 120 to 30MHz/V, Input capacitance. Max* lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts ^ 6SmA, Max* 



TUBE CAPS (Flate) 


$11*00 
13.00 
14.00 

17,00 
20.00 


1 HRl, 4: 

HR2,3, 6 h 1 
HR5, e 

HE? 
KRIO 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



"AH parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted wtth CO mparatJie parts 
If we are out ol stock of an item." 



(flM^^^ electrof\ic$ 

For information call: (602) 242^3037 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



120 72 Magazine • May, 1984 



TYPE 



TUBES 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



2C39/7289 


$ 34.00 


1182/4600A 


$500.00 


HL7815AL 


$ 60.00 


2E25 


7.95 


4600A 


500.00 


7843 


107.00 


2K28 


200.00 


4524 


310.00 


7854 


130.00 


3-500Z 


102.00 


4657 


84.00 


ML7855KAL 


125.00 


3-1000Z/8164 


400.00 


4662 


100.00 


7984 


14.95 


3B28/866A 


9.50 


4665 


500.00 


8072 


84.00 


3CX400U7/8951 


255.00 


4637 


P.O.R. 


8106 


5.00 


3CX1000A7/8283 


526.00 


5675 


42,00 


8117A 


225.00 


3CX3000F1/8239 


567.00 


5721 


250.00 


8121 


110. 00 


3CW30000H7 


1700.00 


5768 


125.00 


8122 


110.00 


3X2500A3 


473.00 


5819 


119.00 


8134 


470.00 


3X3000F1 


567.00 


5836 


232.50 


8156 


12.00 


4-65A/B165 


69.00 


5837 


232.50 


8233 


60.00 


4-125A/4D21 


79.00 


5861 


140.00 


3236 


35.00 


4-250A/5D22 


98.00 


5867A 


185.00 


8295/PL172 


500.00 


4-400A/8438 


98.00 


5858/AX9902 


270.00 


8458 


35.00 


4-400B/7527 


110.00 


5876/A 


42.00 


• 8452 


130.00 


4-400C/6775 


110.00 


5881/6L6 


8.00 


8505A 


95.00 


4-1000A/8166 


444.00 


5893 


60.00 


8533W 


136.00 


4CX250B/7203 


54.00 


5a94/A 


54.00 


8550/A 


75.00 


4CX250FG/8621 


75.00 


5894B/8737 


54.00 


8560AS 


100.00 


4CX250K/8245 


125.00 


5946 


395.00 


8608 


38.00 


4CX250R/75S0W 


90.00 


6083/AZ9909 


95.00 


8624 


100.00 


4CX300A/8167 


170.00 


6146/6146A 


8.50 


8537 


70.00 


4CX350A/8321 


110.00 


6146B/8298 


10. SO 


8643 


83.00 


4CX350F/8322 


115.00 


5146W/7212 


17.95 


8647 


163.00 


4CX350FJ/8904 


140.00 


6156 


110.00 


8583 


95.00 


4CX600J/8809 


835.00 


6159 


13.85 


8877 


465.00 


4CX1000A/8158 


242.50* 


6159B 


23.50 


8908 


13.00 


4CX1000A/8168 


485.00 


6161 


325.00 


8950 


13.00 


4CX15O0B/8660 


555.00 


6280 


42.50 


8930 


137.00 


4CX50OOA/8170 


1100.00 


6291 


180.00 


6L6 Metal 


25.00 


4CX10000D/8171 


1255.00 


6293 


24.00 


5L6GC 


5.03 


4CX15000A/8281 


1500.00 


6326 


P.O.R. 


5CA7/EL34 


5.38 


4CW800F 


710.00 


6360/A 


5.75 


5CL6 


3.50 


4D32 


240.00 


6399 


540 . 00 


6DJ8 


2.50 


4E27A/5-125B 


240.00 


6550A 


10.00 


5Dq5 


6.58 


4PR60A 


200.00 


6883B/8032A/8552 


10.00 


6GF5 


5.85 


4PR50e 


345.00 


6897 


160.00 


6GJ5A 


6.20 


4PR65A/8187 


175.00 


6907 


79.00 


6GK6 


6.00 


4PR1000A/8189 


590.00 


6922/ 6DJ8 


5.00 


6HB5 


6.00 


4X150A/7034 


60.00 


6939 


22.00 


6HF5 


8.73 


4X150D/7609 


95.00 


7094 


250.00 


5JG6A 


6.28 


4X2506 


45.00 


7117 


38.50 


60 H6 


6.00 


4X250F 


45.00 


7203 


P.O.R. 


5JN6 


6.00 


4X500A 


412.00 


7211 


100.00 


6JS6C 


7.25 


5CX15O0A 


660.00 


7213 


300.00* 


eKN6 


5.05 


KT88 


27.50 


7214 


300 . 00* 


5KD6 


8.25 


416B 


45.00 


7271 


135.00 


5LF6 


7.00 


416C 


62 . 50 


7289/2C39 


34.00 


6LQ6 G.E. 


7.00 


572B/T160L 


49.95 


7325 


P.O.R. 


6LQ6/6MJ6 Sylvania 


9.00 


592/3-200A3 


211.00 


7360 


13.50 


6ME6 


8.90 


807 


8.50 


7377 


85.00 


12AT7 


3.50 


81 lA 


15.00 


7408 


2.50 


12AX7 


3.00 


812A 


29.00 


7609 


96.00 


12BY7 


5.00 


813 


50.00 


7735 


36.00 


12JB6A 


5.50 



NOTE * = USED TUBE 



NOTE P.O.R. = PRICE ON REQUEST 



"ALL PARTS MAY BE NEW, USED, OR SURPLUS • PARTS MAY BE SUBSTITUTED WITH COMPARABLE PARTS IF ME 

ARE OUT OF STOCK OF AM ITEM. 



NOTICE: ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



For iftformatrm call: (602) 242-3037 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



"All parts may be nsw or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparable parts 
4f wa are out of stock of an item/' 



Q^^^x electroi|ics 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTtCE 




73 Magazine • May, 1984 127 



ii 



FILTERS" 

COLLINS HechanlCQl Filter #526-972^-010 MODEL F455Z32F 

455KH2i at 3,2KHz wide. May be other models but equivalent- May be used or new, 

ATLAS Crystal Filters 

5-595-2. 7/8/LSB, 5,595-2.7A^B 

8 pole 2.7KH2 wide Upper sideband, litpedence SOOohms 15pf In/800ohms Opf out. 

5.S95-2.7/8A?! 5.595-2.7AfSB 

a pole 2.7Khz wide Upper sideband. Infiedence 800ohms 15pf In/800ohms Opf out, 

5.595^.500/4, 5-595-.500/4/CW 

4 pole SOO cycles wide CW. Inpedance SOOohms 15pf In/800ohms Opf out, 

9.0USB/CW 

6 pole 2,7KHz wide at 6dB. liipedance 680ohms 7pf In/300ohms 8pf out* CW-1599Hz 



?15,99 



19,99 

19,99 
19,99 

19 . 99 



KOKUSAI ELECTRIC CO. nectianiCQl Filter #f1F-^55-ZL/ZU-21H 

455KIIZ at Center Frequency of 453, 5KC, Carrier Frequency of 455KH2 2.36KC Bandwidth. 
Upper sideband, (ZU) 19,93 



tower sideband, (ZL) 



19 , 99 



«««»fl^4«fr»4«««»««#»«<4t^#««fl-«««»«#»1l-»««fl-«li-»«-fl^4«»#«4t»#«««#«««#««fl^*««» 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 



NIKKO 


ra-07800C 


TEW 


FBC-103-2 


SDK 


SCH-113A 


TAMA 


1F-3IH250 


TYCO/CD 


001019380 


MTTOPOIA 


4834363B01 


PTI 


5350C 


PTI 


5426C 


PTI 


1479 


carrECH 


A10300 


rac 


ERXP-15700 


wiu.'Eni 


2131 


«|l^4^4«r«##««fl^^HH^««»«Ht44# 


CERAniC 


FILTERS 


MEL 


4F449 


CLEVITE 


TO-OLA 




TC:F4'12D36A 


MUimm 


Bra455B 




BFB455L 




cm455E 




C™455D 




CtM55E 




CFU455B 




CFU455C 




CFU455G 




CFU455H 




CFU455I 




CFW455D 




CTO455H 




SFB455D 




StWSSD 




SFE10.7MA 




SB^10.7MS 




SPG10,7MA 


mppoN 


LF-B4/CFU455I 




LF-B6/CFU455H 




1F-B8 




LP-cie 


TDKIN 


CF455A/BFU455K 


MATSUSHIRA EFC-L455K 


«#HI'##«««««4#«#«^«»4«4» 


SPECTRA 


PHYSICS INC. Mod 



7,3MH2 

10.6935MtTz 

11.2735Jy!Hz 

CF 3179, 3KHz 

10.7ME'lz 2pole ISKHz bandwidth 

11,7MH2 2pole ISKHz bandwidth 

12MHz 2pole 15kHz bandwidth 

21, 4MHz 2pole 15KH2 bandwidth 

10.7MFTZ 8pole bandwidth 7.5KHz at 3dB, SKHz at 6dB 

45MHz 2pole 15KHZ bandwidth 

20.6HP{Z 36KH2 wide 

CF 7.825MHz 

12,6KC Bai*3pass Filter 3dB bandwidth 1,6kHz from ll»8-13.4KHz 

455KHZ+-2KHZ bandwidth 4-7% at 3dB 

455KHz+--lJ<H2 bandwidth 6dB min 12KHz, 60dB max 36KHz 

455KHZ 

455KHZ 

455KHZ +-5,5KH^ at 3dB , +-'8KHz at 6dB , 4-16KHZ at SOdB 

455KHZ i-7KHz at 3dB , -l-lOKHz at 6dB , H-20KHZ at 50dB 

455KHZ -l-5,5KHz at 3dB , 4-8KHz at 6dB , -Hl6KHz at 60dB 

455KHZ ■i-2Ki4z bandwidth 4-15KHz at 6dB, +-30KHZ at 40dB 

455KHZ -I-2KHZ bandwidth 4-12. 5KHz at 6dB , +-24KHZ at 40dB 

455KHZ -l-lKHz bandwidth -K4.5KHZ at 6dB , 4-lOKHz at 40dB 

455KHZ -i-liaiz bandwidth 'f-3KHz at 6dB , -i-9KHz at 40dB 

455KHZ -i-lKHz bandwidth -^2KHz at 6dB r -l-eKHz at 40dS 

455KHZ 4-lOKHz at 6dB , 4-20KHZ at 40dB 

455KHZ -I-3KHZ at 6dB , 4-9KHz at 40dB 

455KHZ 

455KHZ -I-2KHZ , 3dB bandwidth 4,5KHz 4-lKHz 

10, 7MHz 280KHZ -l-50KHz at 3dB , 650KHz at 20dB 

10,7MH2 230KHZ 4-50KHZ at 3dB , 570KHZ at 20dB 

10.7MHz 

455KHZ 1-lKHz 

455KHZ f-lKHz 

45 SKHz 
455KHZ 

455KHZ +-2iafz 
455KHZ 



$10. 


.00 


10 


.00 


10 


.00 


19 


.99 


5. 


,00 


5 


.00 


5 


.00 


5 


.00 


20 


.00 


6 


.00 


10 


.00 


10 


.00 


« « « # 




10. 


.00 


5- 


.00 


10. 


.00 


2, 


.50 


3. 


.50 


6. 


.65 


6, 


.65 


8, 


.00 


2. 


.90 


2. 


.90 


2. 


.90 


2, 


.90 


2. 


.90 


2, 


.90 


2. 


.90 


2. 


.50 


5. 


00 


2. 


50 


2, 


50 


10. 


00 


2, 


90 


2, 


90 


2. 


90 


10, 


00 


5. 


00 


7, 


00 



1 088 HeNe LASER TUBES 

PCHER OUTPUT 1.6MW. BEfiM DIA. .75M^ BEftM DER. 2.7MR 

68K OHM IWMT BAIIAST lOOOVDC -I— lOOVDC At 3.7MA 

ROTRON WUFFIN FANS Model MARK^/nU2Al 

115 VAC 14 WATTS 50/6 OCPS IMPEDENCE PPOTECTED-F 

loscm at 60CPS THESE ARE NEW 

Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



6KV STRRTING VOLTAGE DC 

$59.99 



8SGFM at 50CPS 



(^^l|z elect roi|iG$ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WtTHOUT NOTICE 



$ 7,99 

"All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparatilQ parts 
if we are oyt of stock of an item." 



For information cali: (602) 2424037 



■ 



128 73 Magazine * May, 1984 



HEWLETT PACKARD SIGNAL GENERATORS 



606A 50KH2 to 65KH2 In 6 bgnds +~13>0utDut level odjustoble 0,luV 

to 3V into 50 Dtes.EuUt-Jn crystol ctii tbrator.4D0 -lOOOHz 
modulotiofi. % 650.00 

606B Sfln»e as acove cut has freauentv cflntrol feature to a] low 

DDeratlon wtth HP SZOfiA Synchronizer. (1100^00 

50ac lOMHz to 43[MH2.0-luV~lV into 50 ohms.Afl.CW.or pulse mod- 

ulatJon^ calibrated attenuator, i 500,00 

6080/ lOMHz to u2Qmi, D.luV-O.SV int& 50 Ohms, +-0.5^ QCCuracy. 

TS510 dull t- In crvstol calibrator. AM-CW or pulse nuEpyt. ( 375,00 

60SE Improved version of popular 60SC,Up to IV output- rma roved 

stability, low reslduol FM. 11^50,00 

60aF iOrtH£ to ii55PlH2 in 5 tmnds *-ls frequency accurocy with 

built-in cry&tQl col ibrotor,Can oe used with HP S70SA 
SynchronizeTr Output continuous I v odjustoble fron ,luV to 
.5V into 50 ohms. $1100,00 

&I2A 450-I250WHZ .o-luV-0,5V into 50 Ohms.co I ibroted output, t 750,00 

E14A 900-:?lD0MH? with mtmy features including conbroted output 

ond all modulotion characteristics. % 500.00 

61&A/ Direct readlna and direct control from LS to ^,26H2, The 
TS403 H.P.616A feotures +-1.5dE calibrated output occurocy froni 

-3127(JBm to -dBm^The Output is directly calibrated in micro- 
volts and dBm with continuous monitoring. Simple operotion 
freauencv died occurocv is +-IS and stability exceeds 0.005"- 
/ C change in ombieni temperoture, Coltbroted attenuator is 
within +-l,5dB over entire output bond, 50 ohm impedonce unit 
has Internal pulse niodulotlon with rep race vanobte from ^0 
Hz to 4KHi.variobte puls-ewldthd to IDusecJond vorioble pulse 
de!oy{3 to 300 usee). Ex te mo I (iiaduJatlng inputs Increos ver- 
satility, t 375,00 



iJJK LABORATORIES THS-2 FLEXIOOM HEADSET. 

tfiese iieodsets oome with tuto to hook li3 to a ICOM radios otci iTony otiier eaulpmait. 
Perfect for Aifpi0TieS-> Helicopters , ffcbtle todlos , or Just tJie Teleplione, 
Ttese Are Factory Mew In Sealec Boxes. Limited Su:ply Qfily $65,95 



qM'H; 



fil6B 

613B 

6JSC 

620A 

520B 
62&A 

870BA 



Seine OS above but later model. * 5CK).00 

3.3 to T.^f^HK range, wlm collbroted output and selection of 
Pulse-FM or jouare wave imdulatioii. i 600. 00 

Saine os above t^ut ioter model, ^2200,00 

? to iXGHz ronge#witn collDlroted output and selection bf 

pu!se-FH or sauare wave modulotion. ^ 750-00 

Same as above but later n«del, J2Z00.00 

10 to l5GH£,lftnw output power with coiibroEed output and . ^^ 

pulse- square wave or FW iDOdulatlon. 14200. 00 

Synchroniser ysed with 606B,608F,The synchronizer is a 
phase-lock treouency stobllizer which provides crystot- 
osc ilia tor freauency stability to tt^Ortn^ in the 608F signal 
gene rotor. Phase locking eliminates microphanics and drift 
resulting in excellent freauency stabil ity,The S708A Includes 
a vernier which can tune the reference osclilotor over a range 
of +-0c25S permtttlng frequency settubilitv to 2 ports In 10 
to the seventh I Provides a very stoble signal that sotlsttes 
monv crittcol oppI loot tons. 

(With HP 606B or 608F) * 350.00 

(Without! 1 450-00 



EHC-10 
NF-105F 



$2500,00 



tilOO.OD 




ELECTROMETRICS EttC-10 RF3/E?^I RECEIVER 

LQw frequency analyser covering 20Hi to SOKtt^ freauency 

range, Extendable to 50O KHz in widebond rrode. 

Enrol re Devices field Intensity ileter. 

Has rtF"105/TA^J«F-l05/TX. NF -105/Tl,NF-lD5/r2 , NF-105/T3 . 

Covers ikKhi to lOOORHz. 

ALL EQUIPMENT CARRY A 50 DAY GUARANTEE. 

EQUIPHEHT IS HOT CALIBRATED. 



TERMS: DOMESTIO: Ptapiad. CQU. oi Gnodll CanJ 

f OflEHSht: Prepaid only. U^. F^TKis. y^nay Onl«r, of C«ihl«f's ChWlc Only. 

CJ^.tlJ Acc*e?1^Wb by teiephoria of rnail. Psymsnt frmfl cuBtomflf 1*1(1 be tiy Cash, Money Order, or CaBh-lBF'g. Gfiee*. Wft f* iWrr 
buk <^B confi^jt flecsfrt pcistjn^l th*c»^n ioj CO.P.'S. CO.D.'i *re atiippod by air only and Ihru Oniled Parcel S*fvi-M 

COHFiAMlND OHPEns; Wt Mc^iki p<4f4r then nonutmina or4M« rwt in imf* aliot a iB^sfAtofvt otnd»f hm b«m] p4«o*4, If [^ompany 
paElcy rKces-altate? a conrirmle^ otH^*. {^$iiA m^fi: "CONFIpwmQ" 'boUtV Of> W\t ordvlf. ir probiiams O* dvpl-^ci'l^ shlpmanls oc- 
cur dltfl lO An Ofiiot Wi^'ii;:^ i$ rtol pti?i)^r\y itVAtk^t. 1h« ^^Viit:m9f Wilt bt K*{4 'Ofl^OdtibriKl fpr 9riy (h^J^S \fyi;utt^, ipli^ a 1^"^ 

restock QhajQA on tti4 f^HucUd plflt. 

Cfl^rr CAUD^ W4) «r« rHTw *<c«pthnD MASTERCAftP, VISA, AISIP AHEHCAN EXPRESS 

DATA 3iiiE€TSt When V* tuiw Ats i:rT««rt in iiacii on dtirfc** wa wiiii tuflpiy tneni wtth ih« vnttf^ 

DEFECTIVE HATEItrALS: All i::lalma rmrdfilficllve mgrerlars mual tje maOs within 30 DAV$ aTtar rficalfjt of llw paicel. All t]lalim 
must irbclurde thie d«1'actira malsi\B.\ fiot telling pL^-poseaV^a r^p^ oE ptir invokiQ, pud a raiuin ■auitt-at\zai\or\ numDSf which mual be 
oCitainsd pr;cif to stilpplng the marcharudt&a Enact to us. m\s csf\ b« aDtatf)66 tiy C-^Mna ipa2!, SiZSUt^ or eandlng ua a postcard. 
Dus Ici MamifBc4urar w^rrantld^ iva sfa yn^^la to f^\aa^ Qf isagA cc^li ^n tt^nn; wh^i;h h^wa ba^n. sold^rad ta of tiave been 
allefed in any way. All rieilurn rtams mual be pachacl pn^parly ot tt will v^ all warraiYllieg Wa do rv)t aaaume nsaponaifflllt^ lor ahip- 
|>inig a:ftd handUng charges inc^rehd 

DELIVERVl OvfjQi^ ara u^Hlly ahippad iha a^m^ rJfLy Ihay #rv plv^ad c^ th4 i>a|ft bgBinat^ cf^y, uruass wa £;re out at mlock on arv 
If am. The cuatomer wilt ba noflltla<E ^ post caci^ II WQi ara gof[><g Iq baclcoffJar the il^m. £hir rvuinal shewing inet.h£Kl ia UPS or U.S. 
Mail depandyng on sJze or tt^a wb|^e cI Ine package, Tasi EqulpmenI la ahipf>ad onl^ by air and is fnelyhl oollwlit, unl««« (xiOF 
arrangernenla have bean made arxl approved. 

FOREICSH ORDERS; Alt 'ra-elgn ortlstB mus? bs j>rst:»ald with a CaartiA^a Ghack, Of UanAy Ordtr mad« Cul In U.S< FOUNDS OlVil^, 
W« »j^ stsrfv t?ul COD Is 'KiC iavarlabbe tti forvigrt cxiuntrhtt and lvtt«ri cyf cradiil am unaCciciiil^b^ U a lorm Ol payment. FUfttMr 
inEDnnati-ofl Is svaUatile on fequvat, 

hOllA& Moi^div thru FfidAy Bu-30 a.m. Id 5d00 p.m. SalurdAya B;:30 t^rn. tD'4lXi p.irr . 

WSURANGE; Pl«a*6 thClude 2S« for frsCh ftddlMOnUE S100.DO Ortr EIOD.OO., UPS OhFLY. All In4ur«d p«Ctt*{l» «Fe ahlpped lltru UPS 
Ortly. II ymi wish to hrtw* li *hK30*d ttirOggti ihv posi iJfFle* (!»•« I» t H.OO I** wf^Ch H- MWiti*i^l t* th* ahipiUfig, handllr^ and in- 



OFEH A<?C0Uh73^ wa negr«i Itwl vw (to riot Msiije open accwsuntQ. 

On&Efl FOnUS: Hv* omv IcHms mm IfK-luisd with aach Drder for youf 'Urwafliance. Additlorml EiniBr Itmnt atm waHlfcl* on 
raqueat. 

PARTS: W« reaervQ the Hght to substitute or repiace any item with a part of equaJ or comparablfl 
fipeci^loatian. 

POSTAGE; Minimum shipping and haftdUng In the U-S-, C^nac^ antj Mexico i^$3.oo itir ground ahip- 

m-6nt£i.. Ski I other coun-lrsss ts 15.50. Ae^ rates are available at the time of your order. All tor^ign orders 
psease Include 25% of the o/dered amount for shipping and handlfr^, CO.D/s are shipped AtR 
ONLY. 

PREPAID ORDERS; Orders musi be accompanied hy a chack. 

PRICES: Priced a^ subjaci ta change y^lthout noUce. 

PURCHASE ORDERS: Wa accept purchase ordafs only when they aie accdmpanied by a check. 

DESTQCK CHAAQES: II parts are returned to MHZ ELECTRONICS, »NC. due to customer error, ihe 

customer wilt be held responsible tor all fees incurred and wilt be tharged a 1&% flESTOCK 
CHARGE witti tha remalndarin CREDIT ONLY. The following must aCCOffif^any arty relUfn; Acopv at 
Oi^r fnvol-ce, return auttKjrljatlqn number which muat t>a obtained prior lo shipping Ihe merehandfese 
back. Returns mu^E be dong within 10 DAYS oE receipt of parcel. Return auihoflzatFon numbers can 
be Obtained by calling (602|i 242^16 Of notifying us by post card. Return authorizatjons will not be 
given out on our SQQ number. 

SALES TAX: ARIZONA residents mu&l add 6% sale^ tax, ynless a slanad ARIZONA resale tax card 
is currently on file with ua. All orders placed by peraons outside of ARIZONA, but delivered to per- 
sons In ARIZONA are subject to the 6% sales tax, 

$tfDRTjU3E OR I>AMAQ£: AH Claims fof sriojlages or damagee rmiel be made withtn 5 DAYS of 
receipt of parcel. Claims muat include a copy of our Itnyo^ce, along with a return auttiorlzatian 
number which can be obtained by contacting u& at {60^ 242^91 £ or sending a post card. Authorlza- 
tiOFUSh cannot be on our 800 number. All items must tie properly packed. If i\&m& are nol pr<>perly 
jacked make sure to contact the carrier so that they can coma out and inspect tha package before 
t Is returned to us. Ctjstomers which do not notify us within thJ& lime period will ba held reaponsitHe 
for the entire order as we will consider the order complete. 



OUR 800 NUMBER IS STfllCTLV FOR ORDERS ONLY (8O0) 528-0180. INFORMATKlH^ CALLS ARE 
TAKEN ON (603)- 242-^18 or (602) 242-3037. 



1^48 




electroqicjii 



2111 W. CAMELBACK AOAO 
PHOENIX. ARIZONA S5015 



'All parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with comparable pans 
if we are out of stock of an item," 



Toll Fr0« Numbtr 
800-52a-01S0 
(For ordtrt only) 

For information call: (602) 242-3037 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



See List of Advertisers on page T 14 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 129 



RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 
-62 Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch ot goodies too 
good to bvpass Items are limited so order today 



2575 Baird Rd, 
Penfield. NY 14526 

716 5S63S50 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




A iuper nigh performance F M wif p 
ttras^ mikie kip TrArtsrn^li m ilftbit 
%iqn^t yp lo 300 yatds wiin excep- 
iionai audio quahly by m[«iin$ of itf 
built ici eJectmt mt^t Mil ificiiHttf«& 
cast rmh« cm ^11 switch anttnrtft 
balUir y an d &upef i nsl r ^tc^ vOn^ T hts 
'1 rhe linesl unil ^v^iifttM? 



FM'3 Kil 

f M-3 Wired and Tested 



11495 




FH Wlrelets MIfc* Kll 

Trar^smits up to 300 lo 
any FM broadcasi ra- 
dio uses any lyp^ ot 
mike Hyns on 3 to 9V Type FM-:? 
haa Added sensitive mrke preamp 
stage 

FM T kit 13,95 FM-a kH $4 §5 



Color Of gin 

See rnusic come 
alive^ 3 different 
lights Thcker with 
music One Jlghl 
each tot, high 
mid- range and 
tows Each mdi- 
viduafly ad|u&(- 
able and drives up 
to 300 W runs &ri 
no VAC 

Complete kii 
ML-1 
19.95 



VidM ModulfllDf Kit 
Co<nv«ili any Tv lo video mfliKtOf Stpet 

stable. tufiatiHt over cfi 4-6 Runs oti 5- 
iSV BCcepEtsJd video I4gnil BnsluniiDn 

ihe- marheli Conipl^*!*' h.i1 VO-i t7,W 



Ltd Bllnty KH 
A g:reat aiEeniioin get- 
re r which aliefn«telY 
flaslre^ 2 jumdO LEDs 
U^« for ngme badg^ 
Outtons WiArni-ng 
psiief ii^ts. anylfiingf 
Runs on 3 to T5 volts 
Compete krt. BL- 1 



^ 



SufMr Sleuth 
A super seosihvfi ampti - 
lier whhch will pich up a 
pin drop a? ^5 teei' Great 
lof monitonrt^ baibysi 
room or as ge-nera! pur- 
pose am^ilicf Fut! 2" W 
ftr^ outpul. runs on 6 to 
15 waits, USS& 6-45 Ohfri 
Speaker 
Compiled hit ^^9 

15 95 



CPO'1 

f^uns ofi 3-12 Vdt t vnll out 1 KHZ oood for CPO 
Alarm Atidio Otfitlator C4amptete kit 12,15 



ilniv«rtaj Ttmtr KM 

ProvfdBs ihe tiastc parti and PC 
tioard Tequir^ ta pfoirtde a iourcr 
o' cwcci^son Jiming und puts? 
g^nrratron tJses 555 htntt IC and 
m-cJudes a ran^e of p««it toi moil 
timmg needs 



Whiipcr Light Kil 

An interestmg kit sm^atl mike 
picks up souri(3s and converts 
them lo tight The touder the 
sound itie brighter Ihe trght 

Includes mike, controfs up to 
3O0 W runs on ItO VAC 
Complete kit. WL-1 

ie.9s 



Mad Blaster Kit 

Ptoduces LOUD ear shittf^nng^and' 
aTtentinn g«lting UfCfi like sournl 
Can Supply up 10 ^5 watts of 
odFiaxiPt^ auoti Rum en6-tS voC 




Tori» Decoder 

A compleie Tone deco- 
der on a singli? PC 
board Features 40O- ^ 
5000 Hf adFListal>1e '^ 
t^nge '^fO SJOturn pot. voUageregu- 
(aliorv 567 IC Useful for Touch- 
lone burst detect fon F5K etc 
Can a^o b? us^d as a stable tone 
encoder Runs on 5 to 12 voMs 
Complete kit, TD-1 SS.95 



Siren Kil 
Prodtices upward and downward 
wai> characteristic of a police 
sifen S W peak audto output rufii 
on 3*iS votts uses 3-4S ohm 
Speaker 
C^mpieie kit SM-a S2.4S 



MS-1 Kll 



i4.»S 



10 Hi Ttm* aaft* 




Call ^Qijr PtKHie Order in Today. TEflM& 
Sa^; m QLjaranteed of mfmey refuncte^l 

COD add S2 50 Mir^^rtium order 56 00 
Orders under SIO 00 add SI 50 Add 6"* to* 
pQ^iag^. in^uranne. ^ > '<g Overseas add 
i5'> N¥ residoTit^ auu / la« 



CLOCK KITS 

Ypur fiid tvvoril^i »«* htre again Over 7,000 Sotct lo 0«t« 
Be on« ot ihe gang and order yourt today! 

Try your hand at buifding Iha finest looking clock on the 
market Its satin finish anodfzed aluminum case looks great 
anywhere, whjie sjk 4" LED digits provide a highly readable 
display This i& a complete kit. no extras needed, and n only 
takes ^-2 hours to assemble Your choice of case colors 
siivef. gold, black (specify^ 

Clock kit 12' 24 nouf. OC-5 124,95 

Clock w»th 10 mm. ID itmer. 12/24 hour. DC- 10 $23.95 

For wired and tested clocks a6d StO 00 *o ktt price 

SPECIFY 12 OH 24 HOUR FORMAT 



SATELLITE TV KIT 




»t PQPUlAn SAT TIC RECEtVEl* 1N KIT-FCl 



NEW, 



FashirMt ki 9 n«l>i^ 
tiittf (May ^ 

lioni T hf_Ra - 



PARTS PARADE 





Cfltl 



irutge rf 
lai 





ijii^ iunaEi3B auaid to i^]i<mtt 
» . clufld* iif 1*0 PLL dermcsdiJ 

lo ikimns tfntl Ut& tecapliori. end 
?4 chanrtnl 1 unable coverag? 

UllTe TV tmvm arcund tn> n3'9, 

lOUIMri'd'Cir^ri ■.Irudy haveairandw 

tHablii m hii tarn) al ■ nt4 low prica Qrcjvr 



PRICES! 



^«c T^ 

An p«rt« tn InsiwiBd 
10 Iha l^i«^|pRj4Cth* cue. pDiter aupot)! 

!>i«ia ftUHTAtf tnntrudion* Fa«tuf«« otttnrm- 
jfttm incAjdE. dual £9TH«r»ion d««)>an Iw best 



iiur% tl i c efcpy «fair Uodutalor 

H3Br\aHi«fl£it 

flSfl n*c«Mf . 'MAivd »idT«9t«t 

<t20'K LMA 

UPS Mfvppm^ 





IC SPECIALS 



LtNEAR 



301 

' t ' < <i 

I540< 

Mr 

3900 
39 M 



«» 



I n 

II 50 
11 50 
J « 

t1 00 
»1 DO 

iioo 
tits 

i ^9 
l?» 



READOUTS 

FNn .i5i 4 c c II w 

FNO ad/'iio It C * i « 

MAN nmvTTX la'c A i m 
MP ?(!6i *3 C a 100 



TBANSrSTORS 

itf«ia* 
4/ifai 
btijia 

tilt 



lyWiCHF 

Tffri4«»iMr 

Pfir MM Tvfft T^H 



vttm 
viaa 

Mf 






TTL 



74S00 
^447 

747$ 

74 196 



$ 40 
SI. 35 



SPECIAL 



11C90 
tOttft 
72m 

J2Q7A 
T2160 
71tl7C 

S375AB 
7001 



S1500 
S 1.25 
$1?.50 
$ 5.50 
$21-00 
St2 50 
S 2.95 
S 295 
S 6.50 



FERRtTE BEADS 



Sockels 

8 Pin 1O/*3.00 

14 Pm 10/12.00 

16 Pin 10/SZ.OO 

?4 Pm 4/* 2.00 

^6 Pio 4/SZ 00 

40 Pir> 3/12.00 



Oi#d*i 
S t V Zener 20/11 00 
lN9l4Type SO/SlOO 
^KV 2Amp t/SLOO 
lOOV lAmp 1&I1 00 



25 AMP 

100V Bridge 

$1,50 e«ch 

Mm I -Bridge 50 V 
1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



neilslor Aul 
A^jtOrim^ni ol Popular v^lnifrs ■ "< 

wall Cul lead (or PC mounting ■'•" 
canter, '," leads b^g at 300 Ot 
mere 

$t.SO 



Switcties 

Mirn toggle SPOT si &0 

fitd Pusrihuttons N O 3 It. DO 



a- 1 



Earphon^i 
9 e^m good tof vngd |on4 
$«Fah#r^ 9l«iTTT cigchi vie 

5forSl,00 



HiFM a dPim SpKakvr 
S ler II M 



Cr^stati 

aS79545 MHZ $150 

10O00O0 IVI HZ S5.00 

S 24ftaO0 MHZ tS.OO 



AC Ada^trt 
Ga-ad Fo' dochi nic#d 
'^ir>!]en,aii i iD VAC plug 
- pnd 
fl&-dCi3l30mA Jl 0$ 

12 v»c#250niA UM 



vn^li tiuffff* 450 HL W tlB «ciund 
gwlpit CK^ Vi? t**c at 'Q-M n^A TTi 



Slug TuncHd Coiti 



AC Oult«l 

Panel Mminf mttn Le^Ci. 
4/11. M 



C*pACITOftS 

T.5kjF25v"3/Sl.OO 
tByF25VarSl.OO 
,22 uF 25V 3^51 00 



AtUHMftJla 
ElR^itQlvK 

1000 vf If y 11444^ tJ» 
SOQuf 7DV Ai>ai 11* 
r^ uf IQV 4i>ai t t1 M> 



DOIt CCnAHlC 
Q1 16V d>t» » llllO 
1 IfrW n ti D4 

001 1«V » 11 U 

Oil? liV rot I OD 



PC-OC Cfinv»fitr 
*& yilc mpul f^roiij -9 vdc: 1^ 30ma 

*9vdcpToOtitres-T5vdc<ffii6pna ft M 



?fiK ?0 Turn tMin Ptir tl.oo 
1 K ?0 Ttim Trim P»r S £{) 



Ceramic IF Filt^'-— 
Mini^yvi nOU^ ' kH; 



'IE 



Trtmmvr C*flt 

SUbl* PitlvprOpyiBrip 

.»*a 



StfyMl 1" diftmeTer 'i" (tiicti 
cryital miht cartngjQe I.7S 



Coil Connector 

Chassis mount 

BNC eyp« $1.00 



Mmi RG-174 Coa* 
10 ft tor ST 00 



N^cf quahtjr ciipi S for H 00 






fWKittM 



S p4fi typa gold conncta im 
niA-TD03 car eioct fno&M 
price TV •• 



- YtjtfT ctiot^v pifBVtm ipecity 
iMtni Rftd JufflMt Red. High Inlvifdy R«d. lllumrfnalCK Red 1/11 
M»ni Veiiaw^ Jiinit» Ve^iQw Jum&o Grren t/tl 



MQlcoia MV ?aC4 30 i^ I" NqminBl cap » H PF 

j« •*oii Of i/ii.oa 



Tungbie rifn^a 



Audio 

Prescaler 

Make higin respiutipn aydio 
measurments. great for musical 
mslrumeni tuning, PL tones, etc 
Multiplies audio UP in frfiquencv, 
ssfectable kIO or x100, gives 01 
HZ f evolution with t sec gA\e 
ttifie' High sensiitivity or25ftiv, 1 
meg input i and bujJt-rn Mtermg 
gtves great performafrce Runs 
on 9V battery all CMOS 
PS-2 kil % 35.95 

PS -2 wtred $ 49,95 




600 MHz 

PRESCALER 



Extend the range of your 
counter to 600 MHz Works 
With all counters Less than 
150 mv sensitjvtty specify - 
10 or -100 

Wired, tested PS-iB $59.95 
K«t. P5-1B $44.9S 



30 Witt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Class C power amp features 8 times power gam 1 Vtf in 
(Of 8 our 2 W in fof 15 out. 4W in for 30 OUl Maw output of 35 W 
incredible value, complete wifti all parts. 1^^ case and T-Ft relay 
FA-t. 30 Vtf pwr amp kit $ 24.95 

TR-7. RF sensed T-R relay kil 6,95 



MftF'238 tpansistof ai irted in PA-t 
e-lOdb gam 150 mhz itIJS 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(IW^ and cfoses DPDT relay. 

For RF sensed T-R relay 

TR-1 Kit 16.95 



Pef09t Suf>pty Ktl 

SLrpptvP''0'Vid*$vflriabl'e 6 la Ifivoitsit 
200 ma and *Sat i Amp E^ceUem loAd 
regulation, good lillermg and stihI'I 
size Less iranstarm^rs. r«qyjres 6 3V 
ia 1 A artd 2A VCT 
Cofnplet« kll PS-3LT *6 fS 



01»-AWP Special .-r 
Bi-FET LF t374t - Oiicel pin tor pir> 741 <y- Q\J 7 cui 500.000 MEG 
input I $up«r 1 04 50 PA input ■^^'^ jn^vN) lyUQwef dnm 
5<Jforoiilf Jtt» ^O^ 10 for »a DO 



7BMG 
79MG 
723 
309K 

7ao5 



lias 

SI 2S 

SI 1» 
|l 00 



n*gutAtofi 



rsi2 

781S 
7905 
7912 
?i15 



tl.QO 
¥1.00 
tV35 
St2S 
tl.39 



StHink Tu&jufft Nub« 
r4ic* pt^CLiT pen ot t^nnli iirr "f I •• 
thrsnh lo t QnaH tcvr loricm id/tlW 



Hlftt 10-9i H«aT S^nks 
Tnernnffor ti**na S Itr fi dP 

To 'SO HhI S^^ki 1 tor S tDQ 



Opto Isolators - 4H2B type 
Opto Reflectors - Phplo diode 



LED 



H 



S.50 it. 
$1,00 «■. 



IMtJiPlm 

IrfGrtBK UrBady pf aciil m Uftgth pi 7 l^rtaci 
Fof 1< pin locfcBti 2a tlrtfi lot tlOO 



cot ^'hiHocatli 

ntt»i1incfi war in MrHH h^hi f£{]i ohmi lu 



im 



130 73 Magazine • May, 1984 




Frices an(t Avaiiatitity Sattjecf to Change 





TEN-TEC 25&1 



AEA 

CPV0-G4 Of VIC SO Sofrwsfe Package . 

MP-20 or MP-64 fntei^face PacHage. . . . 

AMT-1 AmtoryRTTY/CW.... .*....* . ..... , . 

ALLIANCE 

HD73 ^^Q.T sq. ft.j Polalor 

U110 Smeil Elevation Rolalor 

AM ER IT RON 

AUeOQSKAmp 

ASTRON 

RSJ'A 5-7 Amp Powef Supply , . . 
flSlOA 7,5-10 Amp Power Sufply . . 
RStZA 9-12 Amp Power Supply 

RS20A 16-20 Amp Power Supply 

RS20M 16-20 Amp w/rn^ier 

RS35A Z5 35 Amp 

RS3SM 25-35 Amp w/melBr . 

RS50A 37-50 Amp 

RS50M 37-50 Amp w/meter 

AZDEN - 

PCS40O0 2M mobilfl Pig 

BENCHER 

BY-1 Paddle/8¥^2 Chrome 



, . ,Xall 

$129.00 
, . 449.00 

. se9 oc 

, . 49.00 
. (599.00 

S49 DO 

, . 59.D0 
, . a^.DO 

. . .89.00 

. . 103.00 

135.00 

149.00 

199.00 

.225,00 



J280.00 

$39.0(y49 0O 



SANTEC ST 142 




YAESU FT-757GX 



BUTTERNUT 

HFBV 80- TO Melar Veflfcai 

CONNECT SYSTEMS 

Private Patch 11. . . . . 

CUSHCRAFT 

A3 Trabander 3EL. . 

A4 Trtbarder 4£L 

2T4By214Fe Boome^S MEL 2M 

32-19 Supef eooimef 19EL 2M 

DAIWA 

CN520 1 fi-SO MHz SWWPwr Mir 

CN-620B 1.8-150 MHz SWR;Pwf Mtr 
CM630 140-450 MHz SWH/Pwf Mir. . . 
CM720B1.8-tSOMHjiSWf1fPwtMlr. ... 
EMCOMM (SANTEC) 
ST- 142, 222, 442, Alio Slocking KDK FM 

Tht Hpndh«ld» SKIi Qfftrlng Iht Meat 

Ctll lor Your Diteount Prica 
HAL 

CRI 20O Computer Interface 

CHf TOO Ccmpcler InT^rface 
HYGAW 

TH7 OXS 7eL Trlbande^ . . 

TH5JMK,2S5ELTritiander 

Explorer ^A Tnband#r 

CD45 a. 5 sq. ft. Rotator . 

Ham IV 15 $q. M. Rplaror 

T2X 20 sq. ft. Rplalor 

FfM Shipping on ill Cr«nk-trp Towan 

ICOM 

IC-02AT NowA¥ailat>le . ^ . 

27 A NewUara^SmaflSM . . 

■271 H 100WAJI Mode. 

471 A Deluxe Base' Xcvi. .. 

rsi UllJmate Transceiver. . . 



.SITg.OQ 



I425.0O 



.J215.0O 
... 279.00 
75,00 each 
89.00 

. . lea.oo 

110D0 
129.00 

. . . T5CJ.Q0 



2033 
Faclurai 



$270:00 
225.QO 

£43^.00 

389.00 
? 79.00 

199.00 
?4g.D0 

SII&.OQ 
335.00 

Call 

Can 
1 ?0G, oc 




ICOM IC'27A 

2dH With Free Memo-ry Backup, ......... 

745 Amazlnfl Transcei-ver . . .......... 

IC.2AT 

3AT/4AJ Handheld^: 

45A440MHI 

R71A New 4 Improved' Receiver 

KLM 

Oscsf Aniennas in Slock. Call iot Pnces- 

KANTRONICS 

Th* lnl«r1aC* II. Th« bmnd new cornput^r 

CW. RTTY, ASCII. S<}hw«r4 Avatlabl« 

A PPL Eh atari, TRaoC^ TIBS 

Amtor Soflwara Now.AvaPable 

KEN-PRO 

KR-500 eievatipn Rotator 

LARSEN 

NLA-150'MM5/S WaV* 2M Mag Ml 

MFJ 

1228 NeAf Compuler inSerfacff w/AMTOR. . 

1224 Ne* Compuler tnterlace 

313 VHF Conv for HT . . 

Veri^ Lurg* Slock o1 MFJ Product ». C^lt tar 
MIRAGE 

D24N 4fl0 MHz Ainp . , , 

010101^ 440 MHz Amp 

B1016 10-1^0 Amp/Pre4mp 

B3016 30^160 Amp/Pfeamp 

SHURE 

4440 Desk Mic 

TEN TEC 

The lanlflstic Corsair 

2510 Oacaf Tranaveiler. 

2591 2M Hand he J d 

TOKYO HY POWER 

HL T60V3Dr lOneOWPreamp 

HL T60V 25/160W Preamp , 

HLWU t0/8QW UHF Amp/P^camp 

HiaZV lO^eOW Preamp 

HL45U tOM5W UNF Amp/Preamp, . 

VA£SU 

FT-980 Computer Aided Xcvr System 

FT-757GK Super auy 

Fl-20Sn 3M Handheld 

FT- 726 R Tn&and Xcvr 

FT'203R Mew N.T 



sseg.QO 

. $2 15.00 
. .235.00 
..335.00 
.. .Call 



Inl4rl4ce iof 
for VICiO, ce4. 



,5179.00 



t39.00 

Call 

Call 

136.00 

DJacoMnt Prlclngi. 

1179.00 

..£79 00 

. 245.00 
. .199.00 

.,.- 155.00 

. . .$1020.00 

,., . .425.00 

. . Ava»latiie 

S295.00 

269.00 
305.00 
139 00 
17500 

$1289,00 
?40.00 
265.00 

.. .Call 
.Cair 



USED EQUIPMENT 




This list was compiled 2/S/a4. Our used 

equipment changes dafly. Please write or 

calt for our current fisting. 




AEA 

M^Si^ftD READER. ....... $149-00 

A RPBf 

T-tryODO ?M. ........ 5215,00 

PCS ?800 lOH ........ , 175.00 

PCS 300 H.T. ....... . ^09. 00 

PCS 300/TONE ........ 225.00 

DENT RON 

HLA 2&00 AMP . , 5&49.00 

W? WATTMTR 49.. 00 

p_RAKE 

TS7/PS7 - $875.00 

R7A RCVR . 1 ,025.00 

TRJi., RV4, AC . 349.00 

HB] RV6, AC4 469.00 

ECOMM 

ST7T i!40Mhz . . il 69.00 

HAL 

CT2?00, XB2100 7f3bM 

HFATHKJT 

SaiO^AVCH, PS, Spkr .... S399..00 

SEe34 Console 100.00 

SE102, PS, CW ...,,., 325.00 

seioi,ps» cirf ■ . 2Z5.m 

NWIDI, PS, CW ....... 289,00 

HMIQK PS ......... 250,00 

SB620 Consple 69, Op 

SA2060, 2KW Tur^r. 189.00 

SA2040, 2KW Tyratr ..... 139.00 

HWSOSe 2M . , , 1.00. OO 

HP1!44 £0A P.S 69.00 

PS9000 OeLujte P.S. 

Spfcr I Dual Clocks .... 169.00 

ICQM 

751 DeLuKe Xcvr ..... .£1,050.00 

720A, CW, AM ....... 725.00 

P5-15 99.00 

740 Xcvr 669.00 

740, CW . 699.00 

25TA All Mode. 399.00 

AG-1 UHF Pre Amp 59.00 

RH-2 ftemote ei9.00 

2SA 5M fted 225,00 

245 HTK , 169.00 

SM-.5 Oesk Mic 29.00 

SM-? Desk Mfc. .....,, 29.00 

HM-a T.T. Mic. 40.00 



KANTRONICS 

THTTNTtRTA^ ....,,. i 79.00 

HAMSOrr TRBO^C . V .. , . . 45.00 

FIHLDOAY READER 99.00 

KENWO OD 

TS B30S., CM "$675.. 00 

TS 820S , . . , 539,00 

TS &Z^ 4a9.00 

VFO-a^O ... 115,00 

T$ I20S 379.00 

PS-30 99.00 

TS99DyR599D . . . . , 450.00. 

W/ Filter 

AT 130 Tunpr 95.00 

7200 2W . . . . Sg.OD 

PS' 5 w/T Truer ........ 29. QD 

RM' 76 Remote 50.00 

GC'-B DC Chgr 25.00 

PC-1 i^hone Pitch ...,,. Z9^Qn 

YQ 455 C 5[]aH^ fS30) . . . . . 65.00 

MFJ 



495 Super K^^fhofiTdmty 


. . il 99,00 


1224 Interface , , . . 


. . 7D.00 


72T SSE/CW Filter . . . 


, , 40.00 


CWF' 2 Filter 


. . 25.0.0 


?A Hour Clqck 


. . 20.00 


SWAM 




Astro 150 itcvr .... 


p 


102BX Xcvr,. PSU6 . , , 


. . 499.00 



TEN -TEC 

Corsair. , ► , 
OMWI-C/CW . . 
OMNI-O/B . . 
Deltd , NB . . 
Triton IV,. CU , 
Ar^sy ., . . 
Argondut t5Q9) 

255 PS/Spkr . 
262M-P3/Spkr 
VFO - Cqrsali- 
Hm,~ Delta 
234 Pro cess ar 
276 X Cal . . 



NB 



17^9.00: 

625 . 00 

429.00 

4S5.00: 

325 

375 

2ZS 

239.00 

1?9.00 

99.00 

1?9.00 

129.00 

69,00 

19. CC 



DO 
OD 
00 



YAESU 

FT 10^ Icvr .-......,. 56^9.00 

FT901 DM. . , eig.OO 

FTlOl £i;/CW , . 449 qq 

FT2?5 RD All Mode ,]][[] 47g!oO 

FT30T D/fP301D ....... 525. QD 

FRG 7000 ficvr , 299.00 

FL210Dr Amp. 399 DO 

n 70Sfi 440 H.T. ...... 219.00 

FT 227R 149,00 

, FT 227 RA , . . . 169.00 

FT ^0^ H.T 100. QQ 

VD 143 Desk mc 29.00 

NC-IA Chgr. . , 12.00 

PA 3 DC Chgr 25,00 

Xf 30C Cwfilt 25.00 

MISC. 

Diawa CNA 1001 AlIo tuner. ♦ . 1239.00 

Robot 400 ......... 250.00 

Ps»9S^nic Camera ...... 7&.00 

Zoom Lens .......,, .69,00 

Hitatchi FP3O30 Color C^m^fra 

W/Zoom Lens ^ Colojr >t.Qiiitar CALL 

GaU)Ci/ 5MK2 P.S. , -, :, . . . 199.00 

Galj3K}! Vfo 69.00 

Galazy 5Ml^2. P.E. . . . . , tT9.00 
LOM Output 

0X302 Rcvr 239.00 

DKZDO Rctfr ......... 125.00 

Wilson 1405 H.T 89,00 

Wils&n 1402 H.T. ...... 89.00 

Eimac S374 (Mewj ...... 1^5.00 

SANYO 9^' MOKITOR , 75.00 

HVGAII4 TH60X . 189.00 

KLM 10/70 AMP . BS . DO 

DIAtjA CN 520M Wtr 50.00 



CLOSE OUT SPECIALS 

AEA 

KT- 1 Keyer/Traf ner. . . 
MK- Kejer ...... 



DENTON 

W? Wdtt Mtt . . . 

DRAKE 

Theta 7000E . . . 
Rv-7 Vfo .... 

ICOM 

40? 432 Mhz/Xcvr 
74Q/PS + 50 Rebate 



$ 69,00 
49,00 

% a5.oo 

E559.00 
149.00 

$249.00 
899.00 



Send SA5E for our new & 
MON FRI 9AM 6PI\fl * 



used equipment 
SAT 9AM-3PM 



list. 



ICOM, WILSON. KENWOOD 

and MAXON Commercial 

iqulpmenf Available 



30 DAY WARRANTY ON USED EOUIPMENT 




(NTERNATIQMAl) 



ftvmpags 78 

majof lan^uAge spq»i^, bul did yo<i knom 
thai besides Spantsii over 100 dialects 
ttso are spo^efi? Alrnc^} alt of them rtave 
noihrnD to do wilti the Sfjiaiiish Ea^nguaige 
and tiive be«fi spoken for thou&and^ ol 
f9%m. You may just get a chanc« lo hear 
one ipoken on iwo maters sometime 
when you're tkwn our wayt M^^f a /a vista 
Jof now! 






MONTSERRAT 

EffQt "Bobbie" MArtifi VP2M0 
PO Box 1 }3 

PiymtHfth 

Briti&h W^^t tnfftes 

ST/U%QAZING TOWAHO MARS 

The Moritserrat Amateur Radio Society 
IMARS) was fourvded tfi 197B by a small 
hancffui of amateurs hwe on tt*e Brilish 
Canbtie&n i^afKt of Momserrai, West In- 
dies. It all sta^ned when th& amateurs de^ 
Cided to poof their efforts in pablicij^in^ 
afnateuf-radio activities fiere. The firat 
meeting took ptace at Foxes Bay at the 
nome of Arr>old VP2MH ami his beauillul 
wtfe Arleen VPSMl. Gathered Ihere were: 
Arnold (sautHier VP2MH, Chaftes ' Chod" 
Haffii VPaML Dr. Konrad HoUaiz VP2MF, 
ahd Errol 'Bobble'' Mail in VR2M0. 

The first order of business was to elect 
ofMcers. and this look onfy a few mo- 
rnents, for the decisions were unanimous. 
The results were: President— Chod 
VP5ML Vlce-Presidenl— Bobbie VP2M0, 
Sec ret a rv/Trea surer— Arnold VP2MH, and 
Eiceoutlve Momber— Doc VP2MF, 

The total membership Immediately rose 
to B when the XV Lb decided that they were 
not go^ng to be left out: Adeen Gauthier 
VP2ML Kse Hollatz VP2MD. Mae Martin 
VP2MN, and Jean Harris who was not 
then a licefised ham. Ttius ts^an the 
Mofitserrat Amateyr Radio Society, 

Looking 31 ihe Society as ft Js today, It's 
9>omewtiat ctKficutt for the unKr^owing to 
ifnagine ihe humbfe l^ginnings it had. 
Tbe first p^^ect was introducmg amateur- 
radio classes locally amj exposing trie 
Qenerel public to araateur fadio. This was 
done ^n itm form of derrvDnstiattons, news- 
paper art ides, etc. We iminedfafely ap^ 
plied for and were granted affiliation with 
the lARU and Ifie ARRl^ and Mofitserrai 
really came alive on thie bands with our op- 
erators making worldclass sconra in tt^ 
contests arnt In the piieups. 

As we know it today. MARS, with Its 
spectal caJlsign, VP2M, is still very acHi^e 
and insirumefitat in promoting amateur 
radio nationally and Internationally. It Is 
proud ot Its membership of about 50> di- 
vided Into three categories: full member^ 
ship, which entitles one to vote and be 
eligible to hold office, associate member* 
ehip A, which enlitles the holder to vote 
but not to hold office, and associate mem- 
bership B, which Is for anyone not a li- 
censed operator but who has an interest 
in amateur racflo, for wtilch there Js no age 
limit. 

Tf^ Society still has among its priorl- 

132 TBMagazme • May /1 984 



ties amateur-fadio training programs, at 
the end of whicfi there is an exam based 
upon knowledge of the theoretical as- 
pects of eleciiOfitcs and amateur radto 
and th« capability to receive arKt send 12 
words per rninute in Morse code Through 
this system there have been a numher of 
rww hams on tr>e air. 

The present officers of the Society are: 
Dr. Vernon Bufton^e VP2MV, President, a 
formef student of the Society. Sydney St. 
G. Meade VP2MC, Vice-President. Ursula 
Sadief VP2MDY, Secretarv/Treasurer. also 
a past student. Victor James VP2M0. 
Equipment Offlcern also a past student. 
Executive Members are Df, Konrad 
Hoiiatz VP2MF. Erroi "Bobbie" Martin 
VP2M0. and Perry Britain VP2MR. 

The Society's equipment (for its Club 
station^ includes an Icom 730, an IG-22* 
antennas for 2, 10, 15, 20, 40, and 00 n^e^ 
ters, a Spectrum SCR- 1000 repeater, and a 
Pheipa Dodge 22' s^ertlcai antenna. The re* 
peater is housed in ttre receiving-station 
building ot the Antilles Radto Corpora - 
lion, under their auspices, and the anten- 
na is rnounted on a 36* pole donated and 
ins tailed tiy our loca] power company. 
MOKLEC. Alt this Is located atop St. 
George's Hill which rjses 1100 feet at»ove 
sea teviH ovedooKing Plymouth and It 
readily accessibJe hy harr^s cm the neigtv 
boring Islands. 

The repeater ar>d assocfated equipment 
were obtairved through ttie perseverance 
ot a few focal hams assisted by the Inllu- 
ence and integrity of our governor, Sir 
David Date, as a gift from Canadian Inter- 
na llonai Development Aid (CtOA) for ihe 
purpose of providing communications 
Island-wide In times of emergencies. II Is 
an open repeater except when it is being 
used for Its primary purpose. The frequen- 
cy is 14a37/.97. 



The original surveys as to the effective- 
ness of Z-meter communications island- 
wide were carried out many years ago trf 
Alex Kasevlch VF2MM and Be^slMe Martin 
VP2MD usmg an FMH hand-^etd and a 
Drake TR'22C portable, and it was discov- 
eted that due to the votcanic structure of 
trie islands, 2 meters proved very effective 
due to ihe number of reflections we were 
obtaining; this meeni that wtth a trans- 
militrbg station focated atop any high 
point, communicaiiorvs could be maJn- 
tamed on a contini>oiis baeie. 

The Montserrat Amateur ^<tiO Society 
has fontied an Emergency^isasler Team 
composed of at least 12 operators resi- 
dent at vanous parts of the Islantd who are 
always ready lo go into action if required, 
and there is a daily preparedness r>et held 
vie the repeater at 2230Z each evening. 
The net controllers are on a weekly rote* 
tlonal basis to give each the opportunity 
and traming necessary to handle traffic. 
Each parson has been issued an tcom IC-2 
hand^held, spare batteries, converters, 
and otheF accessories lo faclvilate effi- 
ciency. Along with this dally exerclsep 
there are regular island-wic^e simutaled- 
emergency tests involving the entire 
membership. 

Because of the valuable service Ihat the 
Society has been rendermg. the local gov- 
ernment has awarded it imponKluty-free 
concessions. Tfwse are limited lo ifw 
n^embers only, so vtsitors to the island are 
expected to pay ihe regular tvtun^ifie- 
deposit r8<iuired by the system here. This 
deposit is ttas^ upon the value ol tfie 
equipment that the individual is bring* 
ir>o in. 

UCENSIKG AftiD 0PERATIN<3 
REQUIREMENTS 

The island of Moniserrat ^whlch Is 
39-1^ square miles and is a Brtitsii col* 
ony) has reciprocaMicensing agreements 
{no third-party traff icjt with many countries 
including the USA and Canaffa, and the 
following can prove very helpful to per- 
sons wishing to operate here. To obtain 
permission to operate on VP2M, one 
should (a) send a letter ol application 
stating your estimated Lime of arrival, (b) 




Ttte VP2M0 »m»nrts farm, iPhoto by VE5RA} 



the intended lenglh of stay, (ct Intended 
ad<ire&s while here, and (d) type ol opera- 
tion intertctod; include (e) a copy of your 
natiimat license, {f) a request (or acknowl- 
edgement of receipt, end (g) a bank draft 
Of certified ctieck In tfie amount of 
USS7,00 and an SAE with funds for return 
postage t^o SASEs as foreign stamps 
cannot t>e used fierejv 

Setfid to The Teiecommynlcafions Df- 
ftcer. Ministry of Communications and 
Works, General Turning Road. Rymputh. 
Mcxitserrat, British West indies. Please 
make youf application at least 2 months 
prior to your intended time of arrival in 
order to allow enough time for prpcessing 
and mailing, 

UCENSE JURISOICTION BOUNDARIES 

Irrespective of the shady practices very 
evident today in some areas and the ap- 
parent disregard of what agreements real- 
ly mean, under the reciprocal agreement 
obtaining a VP2M callsign does not In fact 
give one the right to eitport the call, In 
other words, the callsign bsued by recip- 
roc^ agreement is not valid outside ot ftie 
host countfy. If used urder those cins urn- 
stances, it is illegal and is subject lo repri- 
sals Just the same as when any other law 
of a country is broken, (n fact, a person 
who obtains permission to operate here Is 
protected only as tong as he is In the 
jutisdiction of this country; as such, he is 
subject to the laws governing Montserrat 
and by the same standards is not allowed 
lo operate within ihta territory untfJ such 
tinw as permission is applied for and ob- 
tained. 

In tf^ case of maritime rrmbll^, elc^ 
those stations can operate while in inter- 
natfonat waters using ihetr originaJ 
calls/MM2, tMJt just as soon as one enters 
territorial waters, or^ has to QRT Ihe sta- 
tion until permission is granted (unless he 
Itas f^ad prit^r permission^ This topic has 
been the subject of much misunderstand- 
ing in the past, and hopefully Ih^s practice 
will cease to ei^lst. If one Is r>at aware of 
the requirements, one only has to ask 
around, for ignorance of Ihe law Is no 
excuse f 

This Tti [sunders I ending, sometimes de- 
liberate, has led many admlnielrations to 
change their licensing system, reverting 
to portable calls or slash suffixes In a 
move to thwart these offenders, and as a 
result, much Inconvenience has t>een 
caused to genuine DXers and cent esters 
alike, and Ihe objective Is to stop issuing 
something that can be erporied^ 

It's a real shame if it results thus, but we 
onty fiave ourselves to blame. 



I I 

THE NETHERLANDS 

H0ffk Meefmsfj. Jr. PD0DDV 
ZandvooftBTWf^ 33 
ZfffGRAetdBftniHit 
The N&ttiertanda 

TOP SCORE FROM DUTCH SWL 

Dutch SWL Jan Steenbergen ML-213 
has a top score on VHF and UHF. On two 
meters, Jan received Ihe incredible num^ 
ber of 60 different countries, 58 of them 
conflrrred. His best catch on two was 
Z56DN via transequatorlai propagatJon. 
On 70 centlmeterSi Jan heard 35 countries 
and got 32 confirmations. Jan's best 
catch on UHF was JAQBOH with Eadb- 
moon-Earth reception. 

ATV RELAY 
In the region of Ooetichem, a lew hard- 



an amat&ur televisian rei^y station. When 
this statpon is neady, triey will place it near 
the village of Aalten In the eastern part of 
the Netherlands, Plans are lo have FM In- 
put on 1275 MHz and an AM-CCIR output 
em 12525 MHz, 

P14YK 

RI4YK is Ihe c^ll til a brand-new station 
thai mU tw on (he air fw stamiard-fre- 
fluencies bfoadcasts lof the benefit of 
Dutch amateurs. The station also vt^U 
broadcast RTTY standa/d teat tones for 
alignment purposes w4th a very stable fre- 
quency. Furthermore, the station wJII be 
able IQ measure the deviation of signals 
received from cotinterpaft stftt^ons In the 
two-meter bar>d. Frequencies thai will b$ 
UMd by Pl4yK are 3600 kH2, iM.BOO MHz. 
and 4S2.800 MHz The station will be on 
the air ort the following dales this year. 
January 11, March 14, May 9. July 11, 
September 12, and the I4th of NQvamber. 
Transmission siarts at ieOO UTC. The first 
operator of F14YK will be Piet van Weef4ee 
PAftYZ 

THERRAC 

About twenty years ago. Itkose rBJIfoecS> 

men who had ham radio as their tKibta^ 
mmt united in the intematlonaJ unkm^ La 
Federation Internaliortale des Radio- 
Amateur-Chammots (the FIRAC). On the 
fkal of Novemtier ot last year, the HANS 
(Radio Amateurs NederJandse Spoor- 
wegenL the Dutch division of the FIRAC, 
was begun. The pufpose of the BANS ts to 
StfOTfeSttkan nalior^l and jntefnational 
contacts b et w s ttn ra^Fway employees. At 
this moinent, the local union has abo^Jt 30 






NEW ZEALAND 

D. J. fD^s} Chapman Z12VR 
459 Kennedy Road 
Nspi&r 
New Zeafsnti 

Ihe sjrac^shuttle flight of WSlFt was 
not very successful for ZL amateurs, as re- 
ported in last month's co*umfi, Ttw rea- 
sons Hwere no doubt attribuiable to Ihe 
iate launchinit of ttve shuttle, changed 
work schedules, rest times, and the space 
vehicle's 2rri antenna not facing Earth' 
warcls when over our area. 

Interested amateurs here were able to 
Obtain ortiil informal ion, times* arid 
freoiierici^ lOr oontacts with W5LFL 
through me ZL 8&me$er AMSAT net on 
3850 liHz niohtly (the ne* was especially 
actiii^ted for informaticHi dissemination), 
2L1M0 E^ing a fine ja£» Jn this direction. 
Other ama.teur3 made trans-Pacific tele- 
phone calls to NASA to get updated or- 
tritaJ data. But ati this was in vain because 
no ZL stations heard Owen trarismitting, 
afttKMjgh many ZL stations tried transmit* 
tirtg on tfit various uplink ffeqt^encles 
without hearing W5LFL caiiing first. How- 
ever, it could be I hat he copied some of 
these stations: we shall just have to wait 
fof the list of contlfmed QSOs. with ir»- 
terest. 

Amateur satellites are an area of grow- 
ing interest m ZL We are fortunate to have 
tan Ashley ZL1A0X as one of the AMSAT^ 
appointed pound-command stations for 
Ihe Phase III awies of craft, lar^ is aiwaya 
ready and witling to provide assistance 
and information to those who are in^ 
terested in this facet of the hobby. As the 
Technlcian-cEass [Ecense in New Zeaiancj 



4s preseiTllv a rvon-McH^e grade, some ZL 
VHFers in this §rade are restricted in their 
satellite work; they are prevented from the 
use of Morse as a means of communi- 
cating through the various amateur satel- 
lites, As a consequence, the Phaso-lltype 
satellites with thalr £m uplink and fOm 
downlink freQuencles are still very popu- 
lar. The Russian R&sefies satellites are 
proving ve^y retiatjie in this respect. 

OSCAR 10 is more of an ottstacte as sta- 
tions require a reasonal>le UHF SSB sig- 
nal to access tfiis craft, and ihis usually 
means the purchase of a 70-cm multi- 
mode rig or a transvertef for the HF rig. 
Nevertheless, an eveHncreasing numbei 
of amateurs In ZL are equipping them- 
sel^s for operating thrcNjgh this bird. The 
trefnendoya DX capat^ljty ottered by 
OSCAR to ts a powerful incentive — from 
ZL locations, places as far away as Israel, 
Kenya, and Hsitsinki are just in range at 
^fiELTJous Imes during the orbit, and the 
ability to make contact with west-coast 
USA Slat Ions most of the time Is also a 
real bonus. 

The special^ervice channels on ^- 
CAB 10 have so far settn ffttle utiiizalion 
'^down under." Surges ti oris nave been 
made to use one of these to drstribuie an 
lARir Region 3 bulletlri with scope (or lo- 
cal news inserts. This is aiready tMring 
done in Region 1 ar\d seems to be working 
very well. Information on STS-9 was 
broadcast from OSCAR tO and pro viewed a 
welcome source of times when HF propa- 
gation was poor. Hopefurty, some use of 
these specfal-service cfianners will tie 
realized in 1984. 

At a later date I wtll try to tifing a refKMt 
on the summef VHF/UHF OX season and 
the annuat VHF/U HF Field Day activities 
{in Februaryj, 

Field Day in ZL originated In Ihe early 
1930s as a means of testing the effective- 
ness ot the newiy-setup ZL Amateur 
Emefgericy Corps, wtien n^^si active 
branches went into the field with portable 
iransmiitefs and receivers opefaled from 
dry tsattefies and nations exchar>ged 
messages up ^nd down th« length of ZL 

There is still an Amateur Ra«Jio Emer- 
gency Field Day each year to test the 
emergency communications network, btJt 
Ihe real Field Day activity is the National 
Field Day in February, when branches of 
NZABT set up stations in a field situation, 
operate from softw form of portable pow- 
er. ar>cl participate in a content to find ihe 
lop teams m each ZL distnct and overall 
winrters for tfve whofe count ry. 

There are trophies (or ORP, single oper- 
ator only. CW only, atc-i and East year 60 of 
the tela I of 79 branches were activated in 
the contest. The National Field Dey prepa- 
rations tiegin with the selection of suit- 
able sites, and tfie^se vary from some- 
where wMhtn city ilmtts to isolated slttia^ 
lion^ away from criies and towns. Once 
the sites have been selected, trw next st^ 
is lo organize tt>e antennas to be used and 
prepare ihem in a knock-down state for 
quick and easy setting up on the morning 
of Field Day, 

One of the rules govemir^ this activity 
is that no part of the station may b« erect- 
od before TO am on Ihe rncMning of Field 
Day, in prepaiation for the commerKe- 
ment of tfre first opefatifig seealon at 1500 
hours Ihe same day. 

So, once the antennas have t>een ar- 
ranged, then the FD control Eer recruUs op- 
erators, rigs, the poriat>le powef supply, 
and tents or other portable accommoda- 
tions lor the station and the opafators 
who have to camp out overnight, and ar- 
ranges a n>eetiT>g to coordinate all these 
dietails. The operator^ wf«o are n^nnlng 
the station have to atterKJ to their per- 
sonal requirements for food and sleeping 
if they ere in the overnight group. There 



are usuaily a number oi operators w4io ■!- 
lend for their operating periods and return 
horrw for ovemigtti. 

The contest operating periods are from 
1500 to 2400 hours Saturday and from 
0600 to 1500 Sunday. During that tima. 
stations operate on &0 and 40 meters, 
phorve and CW, under the usual ooniesi 
setup, ejec hanging number groups for 
each contest The operating periods are 
on an hogrfy iMisis. only one contact Iw 
each mtxte being permissible between 
stations each hour. TTve usual arrange- 
ment followed by most stations is phone 
for the first hair hour and CW for the sec- 
ond half hour, throughout the contest. Lo- 
cation and propagation as well as operai' 
ing sKills play a b^g part In each group's 
activities, but come what may, most 
tiranch groups have a ball on Pleid Day. 

There are always many humorous sto- 
ries roid at subsequent branch meetings 
about the various activities ol the parties 
pants both on the air and duhng their rest 
periods. And also there are the hard-luck 
tales when rig failures, antenna problems, 
propagation, etc ro&bed a team of their 
chances in ttie contest. But regardless of 
Itie&e probtems. the really keen or^es are 
always to the fore wtien the names are bi^- 
ir^j collected for Field Day operators each 
year because li gives members a chance 
lo gel together in a picnic atmosphere^ 
compete against Ihe other branches of 
N2ART. and enjoy themselves in a frSeniiJIy 
Competitive environment with plenty of 
time for operating ar>d eyebaii rag-chew- 
ing t^etween 0{>erating periods with other 
members of Ihe team and visitors to the 
site. Of course, tt*ere is also the consurnp- 
tion of numefoua 807s, TUls., or whatever 
your special name might be for the prover- 
biaf bottle of beer, as February In ZL Is ihe 
equivalent of July/^August in the Northern 
Hemisphere; it is plenty hot end good 
mosquito weal tier usually^ just the setting 
tor campiing out arwi increasing the liquid 
iniake. 

BUB *n* PIECES 

A recent visitor to ZL-tarKl was 
W6REC/2L«AJW (Duane Asherman) who 
has been hitchhiking throughout both 
main Islands, meeting amateurs he has 
worked and talking lo interested groups 
Oh the artificial heart profect he was asso- 
ciated with several years ago in lh« 
States. Duane also is meeting wtth vfn- 
ttQB motorcycle groups, too, as ttiat is an- 
other of the interests he has. 

White in our area, Duane attended a 
special meeting of Ihe local branch and 
gave us a talk on the development of the 
artificial heart with the team he was in- 
volved with in Cleveland. Ohio, some 
ydars ago. The talk was received with 
great interest, and from the questions put 
to Duane, itve memt^^s present were ap- 
preciative of his giving us the ctiance to 
hesT his talk and rr>eet him, even ttxxigh 
juftt briefty. No doubt many of those he 
met made arrangements for QSOs when 
he returns home to Gail torn la. 




NORWAY 

BjornHugo Af^ LA5YJ 

3f2QAnaetu 

Nqfwmy 

Welcome to a new year, and we are [usi 
getting t^ed to writing 1984. DX activity 
has from my side been rather low, t>ut we 
have managed to wort^ VUTWCY, Lacca- 
dives, on several occasions. Unfortunate- 



ly, this was not a new one. t>ut we got him 
easily on 40m CW Operation s^xmded 
very smooth and easy although the condl- 
lions and the signal were nirediocre; the 
opera I ion went rather easily on both ex- 
peditions. I reckon quite a few DXers 
spent some nice moments working him. 

There ia one thing tttat always surprises 
me: B/en the average operator turns out to 
be 3 rather experiervced operator after a 
while- The only tfrff ere ri ce lietv^een him 
and the very experienced oparator Is the 
speed and the stuE>bornness to keep cm 
giving those 59 reports even If he Is so 
tired that he Is falling asleep between the 
QSOs. Others who seem to chet a lot 
atxxjt how great they are but haven't yet 
proved 11 in a contesi seem to fall apart 
when placed uruier those stressfui condi- 
Ikms. It Is diff irrult to judige wtio wHI tie a 
better operator, tjut it seems to me I hat 
ttie average serious DXer could do the |ob 
perfectly even it a tittle sfowty in the be- 
ginning. It's just a matter ot will and un- 
derstanding. 

Even if i haven't worked too many OX 
stations on the lower brands. I have spent 
some time monitoring 160, 80, and 40 me- 
ters and have on several occasions had 
Itie pleasure of tiearing stations all ovi^ 
the worfd come thmt»gh on 160. 80 has 
t^een as usual quite goodn Itnrt not the big 
burst I have been usad to. Other LAs have 
of course had some nice openlftgs, but It's 
a matter of being at the right place at the 
right time. Since I Nave only the weekends 
to spend, the ORM level always rise^ quite 
a bit then, and one Surely gets fed up with 
hearir^ ttKtSe muhi^W gtiyS with t^g an- 
tennas laying two or three kHz away from 
each otfittr sitting there caiiirvg CO OX 
hotir after hour. Surely they are working 
some stations, but Tm sure they could 
have worked quite a few more with a little 
bit more iistenlng. Very often a local W 
QSO is laHing place on the sart>e frequen- 
cy, and as a result nothing transpires. You 
could, ot course, go into Ifie same 
business, but since your signal Is not thai 
spacy,. they creep up on yoo. arxj I sincere- 
ty can imagine quite a few more pleasant 
things to do ttian messing around on a 
crowded iBOmeter DX portioii. 

40 meters as always Is great— signals 
pushing through from all areas, and If you 
have the possibility, get up a sloper, di- 
pole, or Inverted V ar^ see for yourself 
what kind of result you may obtain. It*s 
really amazing how good iftat band is. 

Guess what I've done? Tve cornputer* 
ized. Just purchased a C8M^64 and am 
starting to get familiar with the common 
Basic language. Looking into back Issues 
of 73 for programs, but all the programs i 
seem lo have use lor are made for tlie 
TRS^ or Ihe ABC^60. Why couldn't some^ 
one have put in more progfwns lor 
C&M-64 computers? I'm sure t>oth the 
editors and the readers would iike ttiai 
very much^ 

The C6M-64 seems to have taken more 
of the market among radio amateurs In 
Norway. I'm really looking forward to a 
program taking care ol my log tNDOks, 
band^mode, countries, and my 5-band 
WAS, with easy access to tfve information. 
The CBM-S4 stKMjid have the capacity to 
handle this kind of stuff very easily. 

I musi say that this computer seems to 
make me feel rrwre or less the same way I 
felt when presented with my first amateur 
station For some funny reason, I did learn 
that quite easliy though, so even It a few 
years have tjeen added since then, i reck- 
on I shoiiid be at^le lo manage this r>ew 
chatlenge as well. 

The LA -OK group had, during jan^mry, 
another s^jccesstui meeting in Osio^ This 
tirr>e Ihey had made arrangements to in- 
clude a visit of SMOAQD. Efix: gave his 
famous speech based on his DX trip 



73 Magazine • May, 1984 133 



^ 



arounif the Pacific Oceaa H« presented 
his actveniure Iri a very interest tng man- 
n«r. II was. a greai pleasure to me«1 him tor 
ttie very first time^ li is rathm rare lor us In 
Norway to be able to greet such acoom- 
pKslied hams on the OX front. 

ErJc himsGtf used ths oppcrtunlly to col- 
\^c\ members for the NCDXA, ar\d I slrv 
cefftly hope that Ihey will appreciate his 
efforis in California, 

This session was really qufle an unfor- 
gettable one, and aoain. thanks to Eric for 
taking the tims lo visit us and to the LA-DX 
group fof ttie arrangement. It is absolutely 
recommended ttial you invite Eric 
SMOAGD If you wish to have a successful 
meeting. 

We have just heard that several of the 
guys here in LA-tand have been at>le lo 
work 2LBAFH on Kemiadec Island and 
thai he Is acth^e even on 40 mieters. Surely 
I can tell what my we^cemls will be oc- 
cupied with until I land Hial new one for 
me. Actual Jy, we sincerely hoped that Jim 
VK9NS would be able to go Ihere, but it 
seems that this has been caoceHed for the 
time being, so we had better concentrate 
on working the guy who's there. 

As you probably know already, Clipfier- 
ton is due and we are hoping that wrai'lt be 
able to Land ri tHis time; after what Tve 
heard, quite a few ott^ers are having the 
same hope. 

I wish you good tuck in your achl^e^ 
menls both in DXing on the lower bands 
ar^ In getting a new one. 



RADIOIOCATION WIMNKRS 
(Champions and Bunners-Up) 




POLAND 

J^fzy Stymciak 
7S-200 Btaiogafd 
Bucika 2J3 
Poiand 

JUatLEE fUOIOLOCATlON COP^ESTT 

The %Qth Jubilee Radlofocation Conies! 
organized ir\ connection with the 40th an- 
niveraary of the birth of the Poilah Peoples 
Army took place in Funka (Bydgoszcz 
provJnceJ in August, 1983. The Com- 
mander of thte Pomeranian Military 
District. Q^>eraJ Zbl^r^iew B^echmian, was 
an honored guest 

A higher Technical standard was 
echteved in the 10lh contest than m the 
1sl orve, when referees stirouded in thicli^ 
eta had to become visible to do their judg- 
ing. This time, a photodete<:tor coupled 
with a crystal €tock (the work of two de- 
ajgnefs from 8¥dg<^zcz, S. WilcrynsJc^ 
SP2Fl£ and A, Owsianny SP2aj)^ made it 
possible to gauge thke time of ccmpeti- 
lors. 

Elghty-or>e men ar>d women competed 
from *3 district departments of PRAA (Po- 
lish Hadio Amateurs Association), one 
contestant came from GFR, and one from 
GOR partook of (he contest. On August 
251 h, the competition took place on the 
3w5'MHz barKl. The Isfraln was broken up 
by hills and woods and waa rattier diffi- 
culL The length of tP>e route for men was 
&.5 Icm, Amof>g 72 starting contestants, 26 
did nol end the race or went beyond the 
iimJt of time. T?»e best men competitors 
found 8 or 4 senders in about t hour and 
the best women did the same In about 1 
hour 43 minutes. 

The competitions on 144 MHz were car- 
ried out ofi August 26lh, The length of tt>e 
route was 4.5 km, AJso 31 took part tNs 
tirrw. T?>e fimea of the best competitor? 
were from 36 |o i1 minutes according lo 
category. 

By virtue of scores in botti compete* 

134 73Magaiine • May, 1984 



IrKiivirfuBl 


WAA Dlstrid 


3.5-MM2 &arwl 


M«rt 




1. Jerzy Woe 


Bydgoszcz 


2. Jaroslaw Paiubfclcl 


LomZfi 


3. Bemdt Jurgens GFR 


le:i^no 


Woamn 




I. Qahfiela Banach 


Bydgoscz 


2. Agnieszka Gizelska 


Konm 


3. Oiga Prokpwska 


Szczecin 


Jtinioti 




1. Siawomir Kas?ubowaki 


Bydogoszcz 


2. Jarosiaw JaawinakI 


Ijomza 


3. Oariuaz Besaraba 


Pozrtan 


TMnagen 




1. Jefzy Kicpon 


Bydogoflzcz 


2. Dartusz Skiba 


Lesznc 


a Siawomir Fac 


Lornza 


l^^-MHz Band 


Men 




1 . Jerzy Woa 


Konin 


2. Zenon Kuclak 


Leszjio 


3. TeieJiinski Jerzy 


Szczecsn 


Women 




1 . Majiola Grebosz 


ByjiDfloiiCg 


2. Olga Prokowska 


Szczecin 


3. Barbara Pa! oka 


Ostroieka 


Juniors 




1. Siawomir Kaszubowski 


Bydogoizcz 


2. Marek l-lara$imowlc£ 


Szczecin 


3. Karimlerz Kraszewaki 


Lomza 


Teenagers 




1, Pa wet Smyk 


Bydgoszcz 


2. Jerzy Nicpon 


Ostfoieka 


3. DariuszSkit:^ 


Konin 



tfons, the t)est teams were the team of 00 
of PflAAf Bydgoszcz: Champion of Po* 
land; the tsam of DD of PBAA, Lomza; 
Vice-Champion of Poland: and the team of 
DD of PRAA, Biala Podiaska: Second Vice- 
Champion of Poland. 
Congratulations! 



b^IDp 




REPUiLfC OF 
SOUTH AFRICA 

Biii IS6X0, Chairman 
Soumefn Africa DX Asso^atkm 

PQ Box 4mm 
Roo&eveit Psrh 2129 
RepubUc of South Africa 

NEWSLETTER, WEEK ENDINQ 
tST FEBfiUABY 1M4 

One month into the DX yeaf arHl (he 
bands have been buzzing with acllidty 
desptte poor band propagation on 10 and 
tS meters. Predictions fgir the neicl t2 
months vary from fair to poor as we aflde 



furihtf down into the low eiHS of ttie 

ll^year cycle (wh*ch has stilt anoihet two 
years to go before bottoming outt) 20 me- 
ters, however, should provide some very 
good oper^ings ar^ will be the DXer^s 
band for many of those rare contacts. 

Table 1 provides contact Information 
from Erk ZS6ME which gives an indica- 
tion of the band conditions. It is expected 
that Ihe 40m and flOm bands will becorr^ 
more popular as 10 and 15 meleffs deleri- 
orate. 

XTZBR (Uppef Volta) has been very ac- 
tive on 20 meters and can t>e heard most 
nights In a stateside pile up at 21 DO UTC. 
Even from the back of his beam he can 
hear us! Also current and active for the 
next 4 weeks is OM Patrice 5T5RY in Mau- 
ritania^ OM Jotm CT2Ffl will t>e active 
from tt>e AzxKes up untn 196S. Look for 
him on 20m at ± 2100 UTC. 

WHAT IS SADXA? 

SAD)(A was formed In June, 10S3/bya 
group of South African DX operators with 
the aim of assisting DXers and newcom- 
ers to DX with information regarding DX 
operations ar>d technique. The founder 
of SADXA was the iaie Mike Sherman 
ZSSlW, who put forward the idea of a nunv 
ber of prominent South African DXers, 
Other (ounder members are Boh Hooper 
2S6AEV, Bill Smith ZS6XD/H5AHF, Sam 
Ford ZS6BRZ, Eric Meyer ZS€ME, and 
Julius yebermanZS6AFMZ4NY. 

The aims of SAOXA are many, but 
among ttiem is the aim of improving ama- 
teur activity on ttie African continent by 
assisting newcomers (o the hobby in 
countries where equipment cannot t»e ob- 
tained or. if ava^able. isexorbitantfy pficad, 
by donatiT>g equipments OSL cards, etc., 
and offering assistance, where possible, 
with the setting up of new stations. 

DXpedttions are also a ma|or part of the 
SADXA operations, and the general aim fs 
to have at least one a year. Ukely loca- 
lions are Bouvet Island (3Y), Malawi (70), 
Botswana (A22j. Heard Island {VKj, and 
Marion Island {ZS2MI). 

To its members, SADXA wit I provide, in 
the form of a monthly news let let, the lat- 
est news of DX operations arid DXpedi^ 
tlona worldwide, limes, dates, and fre- 
quencies of operation of rare countries 
and stations, rvaws of fofthcoming events, 
and general inlormation and news regard- 
ing DXinQ, Le^ QSL into, propagation pr& 
dictions, etc 

SAOXA wfti also, in the not-too-disiant 
future, conduct an HF nei on orve of the 
barHlB. Details about that will be put> 
Hshed In the newsletter At the moment, a 
DX AlerElng Net is operational on 144,975 
MHz In the WItwatersrand area, and we 
hope to expand ttiat to a 40m net as well 

Alop in Ihe pipellrw Is an "Africa Call- 
ing. , .** DX contest in which the aim will 
be to coritact as many stations on the corv 
tinent of Africa and in ttie Indian Ocean 
area as possible during a 24-hour period. 
An annual trophy, the Mike Sherman Me- 







CW 






RZtAP 


Surinam 




14 MH2 


20007 inc 


VP9DR 


Befmuda 




14 MHz 


1516 


V01GC 


NewfoundiarKa 




14 MHz 


1822 


TU2DD 


fvory Coast 




14 MHz 


1800 


EA2DY 


Spam 




21 MHz 


1920 


HI3PC 


Dominican Republic 


14 MHz 


2100 


GJ2LU 


Jersey Island 




2fl MH/ 


1002 


YB4FN 


Indonesia 




£8 MH£ 


1100 


7PSCL 


Lesotho 




14 MHz 


1S40 


LX4FE 


Luxembourg 


SSB 


14 MHz 


1834 


A4Xi^ 


Oman 




7.074 


1834 


VS5GA 


Brunei 




14.114 


16(» 


4S7PVR 


Sri LanKa 




14.272 


16S3 



morial Trophy, will also be instituted and 
will be awarded to ttw h«m ttiat. In the 
judgment ol the SADXA committee, has 
done the rrtost for the DXing aspect of our 
hobby in that year. 

As can be seen, SADXA is an organiza- 
tion worth belonging to, and without mem- 
bers to support us, we cannot grow or do 
what we woijld like to do. Interested? 
Write us tor application forms^ 




r^i0 t 



SWEDEN 

Ni(s-GuBtav Strom SM5EEP 
KMfnpavagefi 1 
S7T3 00 fagefstd 
Sweden 

THE "CHEAP TRICK" TVRO 
NOW ALSO m SWEDEN 

In my part of the wof Id TVRO et^uipment 
is atili not very common. QIC, the Swed- 
ish ham rriag^2!r>e, ha^ not yet published 
■fiy matefiai about dateline TV. but aa a 
SiiEi&cnbef lo 73 magadna during t9fi2. I 
devoured articles ab<>ut satellite TV. I 
decided with help from these article* lo 
build Dwight Rexroad's Xheap Trick" (73. 
September, 19B2: ^the $100 V/RO Re- 
ceiver," Stephen Gibson) and bring down 
the Russian TV satellite (4 QKz) GrK>ri- 
WOfiU which naa 3 transponders. Tran- 
spomler No. I It available in Sweden. 

I auccdeded with tt«e Cheap Trick and 
can now walch Russian television, I do 
r>o! care much for the East Slock propa- 
ganda, bul I do recommend the children's 
(circus and sport) programs. Before telling 
yoii atK>Lit the hardships with the Cheap 
Trick, I would like to telt you a little about 
mysetf. 

My profesaion Is associated with el«i^ 
trical iwwer equipment (rrwtofs. genei^ 
tofa, irartsformefs, etc.). Whei) I waa in 
scfKKri^ lt>e transistor was nol fT>entior>ed 
In the books! I have always been inter* 
ested In pictures, but I am a lousy phoiog- 
raphe r. 

On my own. t have tried my best to fof- 
fow modern technology. My first project 
was to build a sntall btac^t-dnd-white TV 
set equipped with VHF, UHF, and video In- 
put and outptji. This le^eyiston sel tias 
later been very useful in otf>er pfolects. As 
an old man lor at least well over forty). I 
got my hem ceflificata in 1071. 

Howevern I wanted to do somethInQ 
other than operate in voice and code via 
my station. One tiy one, i have done proj- 
ects for gmi which no other Sweidish 
hams have! This has rrteani thai k have not 
been a>t>le to discuss them with anyone. 
The prpM;1s have been reialively diff tcull. 
They always had lf>eir origin in the United 
States, Itie pro|ects werer 

• 1975: 3STV monitor and flying spot 
scanner {W9NTI^, the only one in Sweden! 

• 1378: SSTV keyboard ^WCLMO}. the only 
one ir% Sweden f 

« l%3: TVRO, Cheap TticK (Restroad), Ihe 
only one In Sweden for the present. 

As you can 4ee, I have SSTV very much 
at heart and I am now on. ttie ajr, color 
SSTV, in the 24-sec mode. 

For the Cheap Trrck pro|$ci, Re^road 
suggested a parabolic antenna a$ well aa 
an LHA. Where to get hold of this equip- 
ment in Sweden where only the Russian 
Qhorijont (with tactory-made TVRO 
equipfTwnt) can t>e seen? However, there 
are 2 or 3 comn^ercial firms wh Itch are get- 
ting prepared tor tt>e real satellite-TV 
wave around 1985-19186. Fortunately, 
these firms happen to have hams on their 
staffs. 



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DON'S CORNER 

Kudo's to Yaesu. Tang, our spy fn Japan, 
heard of the demise of the lC-2 series of 
portable . ."Old Folthful" to HT users. VitelL 
Yaesu is Introducirig a similor design for 
less money. Bells and wtiistles are nice, but 
the plain-jone thumbwheels ai© still most 
demanded by experienced users. Way to 
go Yoesu. 

73, 
Don 



MA 



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Annp^ienol 
Anteco 



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OM SM5EEP wm ttte Ch&ap TrfcK 



SMBEE^'s antenna. 




missing 5% is to to found Jn the warped 
antenfiB and 1fi« dubious LNAj 

Rex, thank you fof this project! H took 
me some timen but i am presutnabty tfie 
only lucky person in Sweden to have expe- 
rienced this miracle. 



Rec&pliofi from the Ghodiont. Thfs tmpfo^ed After further aiming of the antenna. 



I managBd to fiei i warped «nt«nna and 
a laisoratory iMA (GaAsFETMESiaSS) at « 
vefy l€W price. The UNA took TOO mA 
wNch IS no guarantee! for perl eel tunc- 
tlon! Although I had only 40% of flex's re- 
qiilrerT>entSi I decided to go ahead with 
theprojecL 

I staned to otitaln the parts necessaiy 
In HQvefnt>er. 19&2, and in December all 
tftt PGBa wem etchad and equipped ac- 
cording TO flex's insxruoionB. A f£iw part a 
were imported from t!ie United States, His 
deii varies always arrived promptly. During 
the winter (he project was suspended, but 
It c^rrte alive a^ain tn ttie eummef. The an- 
temva wa:& mountMl before the S4jnimer 
N>lidays, The pfi^efna begets in the start- 
Ing-yp procedure. How and wt>ere should I 
starj the alignment? 

There waa no TV satellite receiver lo 
borrow in Sweden Nor did I know any 
owrter of a spectfum anatyzer or a sensi- 
tive counter, t was rbearfy d^perate. but a 
certain Mr. Mac Palofnaki from one of ttw 
commefclal lirms promised me he'd 
check my downconverter (MRF901). Ac- 
cording to flex's instruct lona, we made 
3^ QHz. One element that was OKI 

I now moved up to ttie parage roof IP 
t«St the antenna, thft LNA« and It^ down- 
ti>nvefter; which gave 5OO-90Q MHz c«f- 
liaparKlIng to the UHF channeta Ha. 23-25 
in the Swec^iah TV gyatem. If an detaiis 
functioned and the signal was fed into a 
TV set, I ahouifi gel vi^eo spark lies or at 



the best a very bad picture. I ^t i tiad pic- 
liiTO wtitch later was aiigned to best quality. 
I contmaed my work in i tie gara^-a^ where 
Roji's receiver was to bo aligned step t>y 
step. The UHF tuner was a problem. 

The Input was altered according to 
Rax 'a instructions, biJi in the Output only 
R20, CtO. and C26 were rainoved. tiB ar^ 
C26 were fefriaced by 100Q pF Donse- 
quentliy, r>o tiroae&and transformer. Now 1 
got 70 MH2, but pin 1 was ted with atx>ut 
+ t ,75 V. 

The 7i>MI^ filter was aligned with an 
orijlnafy signal generator wUh an output 
of 50 Ohms arid a very even oulpul level. 

Th« tranafofmer. T1, caused a lot of 
troubie in ttie basel>and Nock. Firstly, I 
found the right connection and the 
70 MHz signal could be divided, 

Ths videc^ and audiobtock caused no 
problems, so I could peacefully watch a 
perfect black-and-white picture on my 
homemade TV »1 Now t beg^n to align 
all itiecirculta starting at ftie antenna arKt 
the LNA- As the RG-59 caWe had now 
been led ir\to my house, the working con- 
ditions were now more pleaaantf 

One last problem to overcome! Ghofi- 
zioot transmits through the SEC AM 
system while we use the FAL system in 
Scandinavia. Thare arft, fKMmmr, now 
PAUSECAM TV s«ts on tt>e market, so of 
course I got hoid of one. By using my VTfl, 
I can now en|oy GhorlzonI In color. The 
quality is 35%. which la very gocxJ. The 




THAILAND 

R&dio Amateut Soctety of TttBilantf 

PO Box 200€ 

Bangkok 

Thait^fitf 

SECOND GENERAL MEETING, l&Ga 

Mayuree Chotlkui HSIYL presided. 
There was introduction of nnew members, 
tncludirtg foreign guests who w^e attendh 
Ing ttie meetirig. 

The society attef»ded the T3th nneetlng 
of SEANET Convention at Singapore. 13 
representatives from RA5T attended. Join- 
ing some 200 delegates from other coun- 
tries. The meeting voted that the t4th 
SEANET Convention, scheduted lor 1084, 
woulfl be t>etd in Malaysia. 

Sombat Tharir>charoen HStBV, trBasur- 
er, repofted thai the grand tota^ remaining 
was 69,706.75 baht [c. DS$3.000]. 

Hans HoEisteln HS1BG, secretary, re- 
ported that Victor C. Clark W4KFC. presi- 
dent of the ABf^L (American Radio ReJay 
LeaigtieK died of heart failure on Ha>em- 
oef 35, 19S3, and ttiat he was going to 
send a cable of condofences In the nan>e o1 
RAST to the League, 

The Central American country of Belize 
If or which the prefix is V3) is applying to 
become a member of JARU Worid Associ* 
at! on: and asked for a vote Ol suppon from 
RAST, Ttie meeting imanimot^ly voted to 
admit (f>a country. 

T^e Asian institute ot Technology (AIT) 
at Rangslt has given informal perm Igs ion 
for RAST to use the site as a place tor per- 
maneni contest operations 

A total of 1€r1 countries were contacted 
durir^s the CQ WW CW contest on Ncywnv 
ber 26-27 from a statfon set up at AH, And 
Thailand expects to rank about sixth with 
an estimated &£5,0OQ points. 

For future CW contests, a consensus 
was sougtit to use the cailsign HSDA 
which is a good c4M for that moda. The 
meeting unanimoualy approved this. 

Beet ion of executive committee merrv 
tiers for 1964 resulted in the following: 
president: Chamnong Phiromphakdee 
H51WB; first vice president: Mayuree 



Chotikul HS1VL; second vice president: 
Prof. John Hugh Jon«S HSIAIT; sectetary 
general: Hans D. HottsteJn HSiBG: deputy 
secretari^; Chaiyong Wongvudhikarrv 
chom HS1BL and SQmt>at Tharlncharoen 
HS1BV; treasurer: Rasdaphorn Buri- 
phlthak HSIDC; dupuly treasurers- Kamol 
Choosri HStDG and Yukluechai Pramlti- 
Ihanakan HS1YP; memtefs at iarg«; 
Chester Davis HStAIM, Athtt Chuencham- 
iiong HS1EK. Sahas Bhukkaman HStWC, 
Banc horn Pramitithanakan HSIJK, 
Thawatchal Suthavanlch HS1HT. and 
Surapong Srivinich HS1NA; bulletin 
manager: Hans Hollslein HStBG; deputy 
QSt rrtanaocT Tony Waitham HS1AMH; 
pubtic relations managersi Tony Waitham 
HS1AMH and UK Chakann Vorawan 
HStW; registrar: Khun Phachem Singh* 
aphalln HSIDH and Kijja Naksomphop 
HS1KJ; lawyer: Dr. Ounn Nakhamdee. 

tNVlTATION TO VlSfTOflS 

The Radio Amateur Society ot Thailand 
ftolds regular monthly meelirkgs Which ail 
foreign radio amateurs and SWI-S visiting 
Bangkok are invited io attond^ 

The club's committee is pleased to In- 
form anypne wtHi may be vfsillr\g Thai (and 
during the drat Sunday of any rrionth that 
Itie society now meeis at tt>e Stngha &tm 
Ha us on Asoke Road. 

An exceilent buffet iuncheon is providid, 
and meetings begin al 11:00 am. A feature 
of Ihe meeting is usually a talk or demon- 
stration relating to amateur radio, as well 
as the usuai intom^al get-together 




TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 

JohfiL Web&m9Y4J\N 

c/o O&partment of Soil Science 

University of ihe West indies 

St Augustine 

Ttinfdad 

West Indies 

The TTARS welcomed the arrival of 
1983. especially due to its designation as 
World Communications Year and the obvi- 
ous emphasis that would be placed on 
communications. The TTARS has always 
found it diff icuit to create an awareness in 
trte locai public of amateur radio. Trinidad 
and Tobago, being \m most southerty of 
the Caribbean islands, lend to escape the 
destruction often wreaked in the more 
northerly Cefibbaan Islands by the paa- 
aageof hurricanes. 



m 73 Magazine * May, 1984 




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73 Magazine • May, 19&4 137 



These hurrkcames, altttouQh v^ry de- 
stiuctive to nomes. propftrti^. and agrtcuh 
lute in the Caribbean «r«a, have actually 
been 3 ben«fil to Itie h«m population. Tho 
Qov^nmefiis In the affected islands have 
recognised the frvportance ot encoyrag* 
Ing amateur-ractlo operations and haAre 
usually extended a variety of priWEegea to 
hams, Including duty free concessions on 
rm ported amateur-racflo gear. This has 
been very good for \tm growth of the ham 
community m th^s area, where income I5 
otten qruJte timlted. 

Unfortunately. In Trinidad and Tobago 
th€ importance 0^ amateur radio had yet 
to be appreciated. Many persona either do 
not understand or do nol know about ama 
teur radio, and It Is often confused with 
CB, which is Illegal In thiB country. This 
confusion has. on occasion, led to the 
harassment of licensed radio amateurs by 
the police. 

The Executive of the TTARS recogniied 
the benefits that coultl be derived from 
WCY ar>d divited a puhlic-av^arefiess and 
-educattofi pfogram i^ t963. 

This pfogfam look the form of a series 
of TV interviews with members of the 
TTARS during which they discussed mosi 
aspects of amateur radio, demonstrated 
ham equipment, and dispFayed sorrie 
samples of home-brewed equipmef\t, 
ThfOiighout the interview series, viewers 
vtefe encouraged to contact the TTAfiS, 
and many dUJ. 

There afsc were radio interviews on the 
liQcal broadcasting stations, and two of 
the ARRi tiims wefe acreerved during 
prime viewing time on the local TV sta- 
tion. The films screened were "The World 
of Amateur Radio" and the or^e on On 
Owen Garriotl's planned operation from 
the space shuttle, Cohmbfa. This was 
quite an achievement for the TTARS, as It 
was previously aimosi impossible to get 
an amateur radio film screerwd at alt 

The pubiii: awiareness program culm^ 
nated In participation by the TTAF^ rn a 
largo government-sponsored e)i;h)bi(Jon 
on Communications. This exhibition was 
held during the last week In Octot>er and 
will be the subject of the second part of 
this review in my next column. 

The TTARS participated in several other 
events during 1983. The annual simulated- 
emiSfgertCy test was conducted in Jurw. 
Participating stattons used only emergen- 
cy power, and many of the newer hams 
were intfoduceil to metfqe handling 
whila opeTating from remote lix:ati'ons. 

Our presideni, Nick Percival 9Y4I4P. at- 
tefided the lARU cofiference in Call. Co- 
lombia, during the flrftt week of July. At 
this conference, NIek wea the officinal rep- 
resentative of both the TTARS and the 
Amateur Radio Society of Barbados 
(ARSB}- Later in the year, in October, he 
once again represented the TTARS at the 
World Amateur Radio International Con- 
ference {WARIQ in Tokyo, Japan. Here 
Nick tiad the rare pffvilege of being the un- 
ofliciiai representative of a/i entire contK 
nent— ihefe was no cme else rap^Bsantlno 
South Ameficaf 

In the first half of the year, the TTARS 
and ARSB Jointly created history ^y link- 
ing the islands of Trinidacl and Barbados 
on two meters. After several years of pian- 
ning. the 9Y-fiP Unit repeater was Installed 
and has been operating since with varying 
itegrees of success. Details of this system 
will he itie subfect ol a future columa 

While on the subject ot rvpeaters: The 
Jocal repeater tias tor many years operat- 
ed on l-4«.34/.94 from a remote site in the 
central mountain range in Trinidad, it ac- 
tuaiiy shares the location with the repeat^ 
ers for Amoco (oil company). From sarty In 
1983, the repeater was on the air sporadi- 
cally and the trouble was traced to 
lengthy powe^ outages in the area caua^ 



InQ the backup battefy system to become 
ejct^usted. On one occasion, the battery 
charger was damaged by the power flue* 
tuations. Hams had, iherefore, become 
accustomed to finding .34^.94 rtot on the 
air, With the introduction of the link re- 
peater system, they simply switched to 
that frequency untJi .34/.94 returned to the 
air. 

In mldOctober, .34;.94 once again dis- 
appeared from the air. After a week hadi 
elapsed ^id it stlh had not returned^, our 
technical officer. gY4AR decided to fn- 
westjgate. We wer^ ati shocked to tearn 
that the repeater hut had been brolcen Into 
and our .34/94 machine, standby t^attery, 
and charger had ail been stolen! Amoco 
a 1^0 iost some of its equipment. For* 
tunately, our duplex a rs were left behind^ 
probably bee e use they were firmly bolted 
down to the floor Up to the time of writing 
this column, the items have still not been 
recovered and the TTARS is maktng ptana 
to puicfiase a new repeater in 19B4. 

Weil, until noott time, 73 and good DXing. 




VENEZUELA 

Luis E. Suamz OA4KOfYV5 
POaox669i4 
Csrsces lO^l-A 
Vert^uetA 

There are several radio clubs in 
Venezueia. Moat are local clubs with 
smaii memberships. The Aaociacion 6q 
Radloaflcionados da Venezuela (AHV) and 
the Psdto Club Veneioiano are national 
organizations with memberships ranging 
in the ttK^i^ands. 

The ARV was est3lif]at)«l in Caracas on 
January 24, t967. It has 43 Seccionales 
(tiranchea) in alt 9 call areas At this time 
there are 7 more Seccionaies aJmosI 
realty to be established. As a demonstra* 
tlon of democracy, the ARV bylaws spech 
fy that the board of directors' HQ would be 
in major cities of the country on a rotation' 
a I basis That's because the ARV has a 
dynamic modem organization teased on 
goodwill and hard work. 

The curraflt natronal board of directors 
inciiKtes the following members: Jose 
tV5A£X» Ffificisco YV3ARE. Manuel 
W5ETV/3, and Nicanor YV5FVN, The gen- 
eral coordinator is Marlchal WSFTU. This 
board has been on duty for the past two 
years. The ninth national convention will 
take place in Ouacara, Garabobo States 
next July, 

This dynamic assoclati^on manages the 
most reliatale and trustworthy OSL bureau 
fn YV-land. At this time, in Caracas the 
bureau is managed by Ramon YVSFAA. 

Besides ali those normal activities of a 
radio club, currently the ARV members are 
carrying out lechnieal seminars arid^ ai 
this moment, they are arranging an expe* 
dltion to the widely-known Angel Falls. 
ThiSi no doubt, is a major e^ent for the 
year. Nevertheless, the ARV fraternity 
feels that there wiii be many important 
happenings during 19S4. 

The seminars are organized by coordi- 
nator Ramon fVSEED. a young medical 
doctor, and are scheduled four times a 
year. The c«ntral subjecl is selected by 
conserisus. The first one was 'The Two* 
Meter 8and" In October; the second was 
''Operational Practices" this January. The 
third was programmed for April on 
"Satellites." 

RADJQ BULLETINS 
YVSARV. the ARVa station In Caracas, 



Name 

Cfrcuila f 

Ger^erai Rafael Urdaneta 

CatatumtK) 

Loss Mot i (ones Perlja 

Jose Leonarck) Ohirlnos 

Mariscal Juan Crisostomo Falcon 

Luis Pena Vazquez 

Circuito 2 

Camilo Prato Pemandez 

Somos Los Comuneros 

Cinco Aguiias Biancas 

Lui del Paramo 

Siff deJ Lago 

General Pedro Briceno Mendez 

Aifredo Artselo Larlba 

CirGuiio 3 

General Juan Jacinto Lara 

PioTamayo 

Jose Vicente de Unda 

General Jose Antonio Paaz 

Circuito 4 

Pedro Fonseca Ferguaort 

General Jost Felix Rihas 

Ciroaifo 5 
Santiago da Leon 
Doctor Jose Maria Vargas 
Gran Qaoique Guaicaipuro 
Vicente Emtlio Sojo 
Guarico 

Francisco I.a20 mart! 
B Sombrero 

Circi/ifo B 

General Pedro Maria Freites 

General Jose Antonio Anzoategui 

Cacique Oriental Paramaconi 

Caroni 

Orinoco 

Cfrculto 7 

GulllefmoTovar 

Gran Mariscai de Ayacucho 

General Juan Manuel Vaides 

General Francisco Esteban Gomez 

QirmitQ B 

Fray L4JC4S de Zaragoia 

Benigno Jose Guarecuoo 

Circuito 9 

Teniente Pedro Camejo 



City 



State 



Calf 



Maracaiho 


Zuha 


YV1ARV 


Cabimas 


Zulla 


YVIARC 


Machiques 


Zulla 


YV1LMP 


Coro 


Falcon 


YV1HV 


Pun to FIjo 


Falcon 


YV1APF 


Valera 


Trujillo 


YV1 LPV 


San Cristotial 


Tachira 


YVaiiV 


San Antonio 


Tachira 


YVaSLC 


Meri^ 


wofiMa 


YV2CAS 


Tovar 


Men da 


YV2LDP 


Cludad Bolivia 


Merida 


yV2SDL 


Bartnfts 


Barlnas 


W2ARV 


Barinltas 


Barinas 


YV2SAL 


Barquislmeto 


Lara 


YV3BV 


El Tocuyo 


Lara 


YV3ARV 


Guanare 


Portuguese 


YV3JVU 


Acarlgua 


Ponuguesa 


WaJAP 


Valencia 


Qmrabobo 


YV4AK 


Maraciy 


Aragua 


YV4RV 


Caracas 


O-F. 


YVSARV 


La Guaira 


Miranda 


YV5JMV 


Los Teques 


Miranda 


YV5GCG 


Guarenas 


Miranda 


YV5VES 


San Juan del OS 


Morroa Guarico 


YV5DJR 


Cat a bozo 


Guarico 


YV5FLM 


El Sombrero 


Guarico 


YV5SES 


Barcelona 


Anzoategui 


W5PMF 


Puerto La Cruz 


Anzoategui 


YV6ARV 


£1 Tigre 


Artzoategui 


W6C0P 


Puerto Ordaz 


Bolivar 


YV6fW 


Ciudad Bolivar 


Bolivar 


YVflRB 


Carupanc 


Sucre 


YV70R 


Cumana 


Sucre 


YV7GM 


Gulfia 


Sucre 


YV7JMV 


Porlama/ 


Nueva Esparta 


YV7RV 


Maiurin 


Monagas 


WBfiV 


Tucupita 


Delia Amacufo 


YVBBJG 



San Fernando de Apure Apure 



YVOTPO 



Tabis t Brancha$ of the AsociBdon de f^adioBthhnBdos de Venaiu&t§. 



broadcasts a weekly btrilrtin on 7,100 kHt 
every Saturday at 1700 UTC, Etch official 
station at each of all 43 Seccionales joins 
IrL I recommend to ali DX«f4 that th«y 
kieep ttie list of all 43 ttittoru for future 
reference (see Tafrle l). The meeting lasts 
several hours due to the large namt>ef of 
participants (Jammers Included). 

NETS 

The Red Venezolana de Radloafl- 
clonados Net is scheduled daily on 3,760 
kHz at the fcl towing times: 1100-1300 
UTC tyy EllseoYVICCV, 1600-1730 LTTC by 
Tlfso W4CYF, and 2200-2400 UTC tiy 
Nubia YV3B0S The RM N«t IntefT^a- 
ciorial YV is held Monday to Friday at 
010O-O2DO irrC on 14,130 KHz. This ve^y 
well kr»own Latin American net l>egan dur- 
ing 1968 and is currently conducted by 
Prlmltivo YV5EPP. AnytXJdy, anywhere, 
looking for any city in i^tln America is en- 
couraged to joint the net. It is also sup- 
ported tjy the local 2'meler FM net of 
repeaters. 

At this tfme they do not sponsor any 
certificate, but soon thiey will ibe announc* 
ini} something. They omn two 2m-FM re- 
peatefs. one at Coro (f^i) 147.300 +B00 
that covers pari of the Netheriands An- 
tilles ami the second is rwar Caracas ai 
147.090 + @00^ This is also very often ac- 
tivated by DX stations from the Caribbean 
area and Argentina, too. 

Of course the ARV has also a natlonel 
coordinator for civil defense and is, 
hervce. a link with government authorities 



m the event of disasters. He is responsible 
lor calling the emergency net if needed. 

eXPEOmON TO CHURUM-VeNA 

The Pomorwa. abof igjnea who pofitiiate 
the tends to the south of the Orinoco rtw«r, 
call the widely krwwn Angel Falls 
•'ChyrumVena." This name la mistaken 
by meny people, even in Venezuela, and 
many timee it is heard that the original 
name of the Angel Fall a le "Churum^ 
Meru." In fiet, expeditions there are 
advertised as expeditions to the Churum- 
Meru, and peopie think th^S En the narr)e of 
the fails, ril explain, sq keep reading. 

To make a viait to ttie Ar^ Falla, it is 
necessary to lake a plane trip to Car\ain%a 
National Park- The park has an area of 
30,000 BQuare kiiornetera— almost as 
iarge as the whole area of Belgium. Norths 
west of this park, on the ban its of 
Canaima Legoon, there i$ a »ite facing 
Hacha Fails named Canalma Camp. The 
eamp Is sponsored by a nationai airline. 
The Hacha Falls are a wide series of falls 
similar to those at Niagara but with not so 
much volume of water. At tlrva foot of ttie 
falls, the Carrao river widens to two times 
Its normal width ar^ forms a lagoon. All 
around this territory there are big. flat- 
lopped, rock mountains whose straight 
S^des rise abrupliy; they are named tepuys 
by the atx>rigines and plateaus by geolo- 
gists. 

The Canalma Camp has cabins all 
around the place for the guests arriving at 
the parte A dining room, bar, and other 



138 73 Magazine * May, 1964 



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73 Magazine • May, 1984 13S 




■ft 



facttiues are on the hilt above the river 
bank. Almosi daily ^pverttl «iu:wsio<ns 
ffepsn frcxn th« camp to the rkeorby water- 
fall a, Mo&t last for a couple of Tiouts. If ttie 
weather Is good, the airline routes its 
planes near the falls so that you can ap* 
pfeclate them fron^ the air before landing 
oc after departure. T^e fact Is that if 
WMltver Is OK to ^m theni by ilr. It ts not 
good fof 0Oing lo th« falls on the g^cKjnd, 
Ibr grourkd travel is by rivef, irva gcx^ 
UrtMlhor m^eans no rains and loa shallow 
watery ftif the cArK>es. 

The Churum-Verw are some 40 km south- 
east of Oanaima Camp. The Falls' expedl- 
tiorts QO en Sday round trips up the river 
during the rainy season when the river is 



NQh (from igne to OocembeOp hy motor- 
ized canoe. TT>e expedlt^oners carry coats. 
alaeiiifla b«Qi» blanl^ets trvl^hts are cold), 
hats, etc. Thj$ river Is named Churum- 
Meru, and thBt'$ why soniB people think 
the waterfall name is Churum-Meru in- 
stead of Cliu rum-Vena. 

TT>e plateau Is name<l Auyan-Te^uy end 
only very few people hsn t^een up there. 
There is a man thai Lives nearby ind 
krkows how to po up, t>ut he doesn't wartt 
to reveal ihe lecret to any except the vofy 
few who are guided by tilm. Most expedi- 
tions to the top of the plateaus go from 
the west side of the plain and take several 
weeks; these are not recommended tor 
totjrists- The 7-day trip to the foot of the 



waterfalls is no4 fttconnnendad for chll- 
tlren less than 15 years ofd. 

Tlie falls starl from a rivef lorrrved 70 
meters below the surface of the plateau. 
The tree fail plunges 960 meters— that's 
20 times as hfgh as Niagara falls. The un- 
derground river is formed by the rain that 
falls over the plateau and then seeps 
through the fissures In the terram. Most of 
the area atop the plain is awamp and the 
air is dsimp and warm. The plain Is ac^^s- 
Sible by air only from mid4^arth to mid- 
May. The rest of the yeaf ft is covered by a 
heavy fog. 

On the tepuys small black scorpior^s 
(iv#, a spades that has existed for 500 
million years. Also there is a smalt black 
load that canrK>t lump; Instead, he walks 



and ciimbs cmf Ito moist rocks. TT>e soil 
Is very poor and Itiere are str«fkOt plants 
urvique to If^ area. Because of poof soils, 
many plants populating the area get their 
nutrients from insects: they are known as 
carnivorous pi ants. But don'l worry; they 
won't eat hems! 

tt is atop the Churum-Venia. tn tt>e 
Auyan-Tepcty, tfiat tZ amateurs from the 
AffV are plannlr>g— as I write this — to call 
CO on March 30, 31. and April 1. The ^ta- 
lion's special caK is 4M5ARV^ and they 
plan to transmit on 6 bands and Jn three 
modes. The most important thing is that 
by the time you read this, an amateur- 
radio expedltlori may have taken place to 
this remote And unique location. 




» 



'I':- 



Ls f 



202 



> 



QUAUTY SATELLITE TELEVISION RECEPTION 

Designed And Engineered Especially For The Home 
System A. 

Conifer's DE-2001 faatures a 12' antenna, contemporafv styled receiver, motoffzed Ant. drlyej LNA. 
plus ail the hardware need^ for a complete installation, t>ack^ by a full-year wa/ranty. The instalta- 
tiori manual gtves^ you ov^r 100 pages of information and instructions. All this for only $2395. 
Frt. C.O,D. 



^ 




System B. 

10" mesn dfitenna, klm Otympiad receiver, 100** LNA, polarotor I. and 125* of wire. 
Only $1495 

Luxor, MTI, LNA'a, and other equipment available 
separately. 




B S^ X/ Sngmefiing 

19208 R. D. Mixe 
Independence, Mo. 64057 

816-795-1413 




IC-745 $995...CALL 



lC-751 $1399...CALL 




IC-271A$699...CALL 
IC-271H...CALL 



IC-471A$799...CALL 



IC-45A...CALL IC-25H...CALL 
IC-25A...CALL IC-290H...CALL 




CLOSE OUT SALE 


USEO 




IC-720A . . $859.CW 


FT-902DM 


. . $695 


FT-102... $695.00 


FT-901 DM . , , . 
FT-101E 


. . $595 
. $495 


SPECIAL SALE 


IC-45A... , $399.00 -.. Call 


IC-290H .. 


, , $399 


TM201.. .5369.00... Call 


TR-7860,,,,,. 


..S279 


Ts-esos . . . . , Call 







IC-27A...CALL 



WORLD GENERAL COVERAGE RECEIVERS 





IC-2AT 
IC'3AT 
tC'4AT 




IC02AT 
IC-04AT 



I 




\ 



111 ^Y^ I 

ill* I 



lo-Hro KENWOOD R-2000, R-1000 vii}^ii,vs^v, FRG.7700 

IC-R71A '^^'^w^^'-' p.gQg \#/Y/SMlsy PRQ.7 



ftoni./»rt4- DX-1000 





JUN'S ELECTRONICS "* 

Call 800 Numbers Our Prices Are Competitive 

800*882-1343 -Aqui Se Habia Espanol ' 800-648-3962 

3919 Sepulveda Blvd. \/\^9 SerVICG What We Sell ^^° ^ Plumb Lane. #107 

Culver City. CA 90230 ... ^ , .,,. . ,,, -. .. Reno, Nevada 89502 

(213)390 8003 We Stocl( What We Advertise ^70218275732 



Reno. Nevada 89502 
(702) 827-5732 



140 73 Magazine • May, 1984 




MOVING? 

Let us knovk 8 weeks in advance so that you won't 
miss a single issue of 73. 

Attach old label where indicated and print new ad- 
dress in space provided. Also include your mailing 
label whenever you write concerning your sub- 
scription. It helps us serve you promptly. Write to: 
^M^^ Subscription Department 

g^ Amrteur Radb's POBo){93l 

m *^ <» TechnicalJournal Farmmgdale NY 1 1737 

D Extend my subfCfiption one addltionat year for oniv $17 97 
D Payment enclosed □ Bill me 



Canada & Meiico S2t)97/T ^^m Ofity li^ Furkds ^Fsmn cm US bank. FtKretgn Siiriace 
S25 OCVt yea-r only US Funds drawn on U^ bank Forcipn Airmail, please inqurr^. 



I 
I 

I if you have no label handy, prtnt OLD address here. 

I 
I 

I 
I 



^4 



Name 



Address 
City 



State 



p*ini Nf: Waddrv^^ hvtv: 



Name 



Address. 
City 



Slate. 



I 



C-85 



CONTROL BOAftD 



1 



SPEECH SYNTHESIS. 
REMOTE PROGRAMMING. 
AUTOPATCH/AUTODIAL, 
LINKING, AND MORE... 
ALL ON ONE BOARDl 




Can or write for detait«d 

speclficationa on the RC-85 
Repeater Control Board. 

10816 Northfid^e Square * Cupertino, CA95014 

f408) 749-8330 



here Is the next generation Repeater 



MARK 4CR 



In 1978 we created the first micro- 
processor based repeater and here is its 
successor the incomparable MARK 4CR. 
Of course it has autodial and tail mes- 
sages, after all, we invented those 
features. Sure it has autopatch, reverse 
patch and built-in ID. But hold on - it 
also has Message Master ^^ real speech 
and receiver voting. Its all new receiver 
puts 7 large helical resonators up front 
for extremely high dynamic range. Yes, 
MARK 4CR is the next generation! 



• Unlimited vocabulary speech messages in your own voice 

• Hundreds of lone access functions, many with lime-of-day setting 

• All vital parameters can be set remotely by tone access 

• Two phone lines and dozens of input/ output control lines 

• 4 channel receiver voting plus full linking capability 

• Bus structured design for easy hardware/ software expansion 

• "Overload proof" receiver with 7 large helical resonators 

• Our famous MCS squelch, often called the best in the business, is 
now even better with automatic fast/ slow switching 



""*^»i«mT» 



p-49 






MICRO CONTROL SPECIALTIES 

23 Elm Park, Groveland, MA 01834 {617) 372-3442 



^Smm U$i ot AavtttfS^rs on^gm Tf# 



73 Magazine • May. 1984 141 



THE MOST AFFORDABLE 

REPEATER 

ALSO HAS THE MOST IMPRESSIVE 
PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

(AND GtVES THEM TO YOU AS STANDARD EQUIPMENT!} 



JUST LOOK AT THESE PRICES! 



Band 



Kit 



10M,eM,2M,220 
440 



§680 
S780 



Wired/TflBted 

$d80 
$980 



Ba§t M and mmd Lntti itm c^jmpisiE mm M pam, mQ(h^B&, hardwmm. ana cfyata^ 

CALL OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS- 

Abo aimftabis for mmofe sfts finking, crossbami, and remote base. 




FEATURES; 

• SENSITIVHY SECOND TO NONE; TYPICALLY 
0.16 yV ON VHF, 0.3 uVON UHF* 

• SELECTIVITY THAT CANT BE BEAT! BOTH 

e POLE CRYSTAL FILTER & CERAMIC FILTER FOR 
GREATER THAN 100 dS AT ± 12KHZ- HELICAL 
RESONATOR FRONT ENDS. SEE R144. R220, 
AND R45t SPECS IN RECEIVER AD BELOW. 

• OTHER GREAT RECEIVER FEATURES: FLLTTTER- 
PROOF SQUELCH, AFC TO COMPENSATE FOR 
OFF-FREQ TRANSMITTERS, SEPARATE LOCAL 
SPEAKER AMPLIFIER & CONTROL, 

• CLEAN, EASY TUNE TRANSMITTER; UP TO 20 WATTS OUT 
(UP TO SOW WITH OPTIONAL PA). 



HIGH QUALITY MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, i 



HIGH-PERFORMANCE 
RECEIVER MODULES 



TRANSMITTERS 




RH4 Shown 



R144/R220FMRCVRSJor2Mor220MH2. 
0. 1 5uV sens.; 3 pole xtal f liter & cefamk: filter 
in H, hefical resonates! ront end for exceptional 
selectivity, more thari-100dBat±12 kHz. 
best available today. Flutter-proof squeJch, 
AFC tracks drifting xmtrs. Xtal oven avail. 
Kit only $138, 

R451 FPRCVR Same butforuhf. Tuned fine 
front end, 0,3 uV sens. Kit only $t3S. 

R76 FM RCVR for 10M. 6M. 2M. 220. or 
commercial bands- As above, but w/o AFC or 
heL res. Kits only $1 18. 
Also avail w/4 poJe filter, only S98/kit. 

R1 1 VHF AM RECEIVER kit for VHFaircr.-n 
band or ham bands. Only $98. 

R1 10^253 SPACE SHUITLE RECEIVER, 

m only $98, 



• T51 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M, 6M. 2M, 
220 MHzoradlacent bands. 2 Watts contin- 
uous, up to 2^/i W intermtttent $6a/klt. 






mironics 



T451 UHFFM EXCITER 2 to 3 Watts on450 
ham band or adjacent freq. Kit only S78. 

VHF& UHFLINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Useon 

either FM or SSB. Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters. 
Several models. Kits from $78. 



A16 RFTIGHTBOX Deep drawn alum, case 
with tight cover a rxJ no seams. 7 ic8x2 inches. 
Designed especially for rejjeaters. $20, 



.^53 



ACCESSORIES 




m COR KITS With Audio miiter. speaker ampli- 
fier, tail & time out timers. KiJ only $36. 

• CWID KITS 158 bitSp field programmablet 
clean audiOn rugged TTL logic. Kit only $68* 

• DTMF DECODER/CONTROLLER KITS. 
Control 2 separate on/off functions with 
toiichtones'p e.g., repeater and autopatch. 
Use with main or auJt. receiver or with Auto- 
patch. Only S90 

• AUTOPATCH KITS. Provide repeater auto- 
patch, reverse patch, phone line remote 
control of repeater, secondary control via 
repeater receiver Many other features. 
Only $90* Requires DTMF Module. 





HELICAL RESONATOR FILTERS available 
separately on pcb w/connectors, 

HRF-144 for 143-150 MHz S38 
HRF-220 tor 213-233 MHz $38 
HRF-43a for 420-450 MHz $48 



142 73 Magazine • May, 1984 



NEW LOW-NOISE PREAMPS RECEIVING CONVERTERS TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 



I 



New low- noise microwave transistors make 
preamps irt the 0.9 to 1,0 dB noise figure 
range possible without the fragility and power 
supply problems of gas-fet's. Units furnished 
wired and tuned to ham band Gen be easily 
retuned to nearby freq. 




Modets LNA{ I 

P30, and P432 

shown 



Model 

LNA 29 
LNA50 
LNA 144 
LWA 220 
LNA432 
LNA800 



Tgn«M« 
Freq Rar>5& Noise Figure 



Gain 



Pirtce 



20^*0 
40-70 

130-iao 

3fiO-470 
470-360 



0-9 dB 
0.9 dB 
1.0(18 
1,0 dB 
1-0 dB 
l.2dB 



^dB 


S39 


20 da 


S39 


16da 


S39 


17dB 


$32 


18dB 


E45 


15dB 


E45 



ECONOMY PREAMPS 



Our traditional preamps. proven in years ot 
service. Over 20,000 m use throughout the 
world. Tuneabfe over narrow range. Specify 
exact freq. band needed, Gain i6-20cfB. NF- 
2 dB or less. VHF units available 27 to 300 MHz. 
UHF units available 300 to 660 MHz. 



P30K, VHF Kit less case 
P30W, VHF Wired/Tested 
P432K. UHF Kit less case 
P432W. UHF Wired/Tested 



$13 
$33 
$21 
$36 



P432 also available in broadband version to 
cover 2Ch650 MHz without tuning. Same price 
as P432; add "B" to modef #. 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 




Our lab has developed a new fine of low-nofse 
receiver preamps with helical resonator filters 
built in. The combination ot a low noise amplifier 
Sim liar to the LN A series and the sharp selectivity 
of a 3 Of 4 section helical resonator provides 
increased sensitivity while reducing in termed 
and cross'band interference in critical appli- 
cations. See selectivity curves at right. Noise 
figure = 1 to 1.2 da Gain = 12 to 15 dB. 



Model 

HRA-144 
HRA-220 
HRA-432 
HRA-i ) 
HRA^ ) 



Tunrrtg Range 

143-150 MHz 
213-233 MHz 
420-450 MHz 
150-1 74MHz 
450-470 MH;t 



Price 

$49 
$49 
S59 
$69 
$79 




Modefs to cover every practical rf & if range to 
listen to SSB, FM, ATV, etc. NF ^ 2 dB or less. 



VHF MODELS 

Kit with Case S49 
Less Case $39 
Wired $69 



Antenna 
Input Range 

2fl'32 

50-52 

50-54 
144-^46 
146-147 
144-144.4 
146-146 
T44-146 
220-222 
220-224 
222-226 
220-224 
222-224 



Receiver 
Output 

144-14S 

26-30 

144-1 4a 
28-30 
26-30 

27-27.4 
26-30 
50-54 
28-30 

144-148 

144-148 
50-54 
28-30 



UHF MODELS 

Kit with Case $59 
Less Case $49 
Wired $75 



432-434 
436-437 
432-436 
432-436 
439.25 



28-30 

28-30 

144-148 

50-54 
61.25 



SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76, 135- 
144, 240-270. 400-420. Of 606-894 MHz bands 
on any scanner. Wired/tested Only S6S. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS! 



FM-5 PC Board Kit - ONLY $1 78 

complete with controls, heat sink, etc. 
10 Watts. 5 Channels, for 2M or 220 MHz, 




While supply 
lasts, get $60 
cabinet kit free when 
you buy an FM-5 Transceiver kit. 
Where else can you gel a com p fete transceiver 
tor only $178 



For SSB, CW, ATV, FM, etc. Why pay big 
bucks for a multi mode rig for each band? Car? 
be 1 i n ke d wi tb recei ve con ve rte rs f or t ra nscel ve. 
2 Watts output vhf, 1 Watt uhf. 



For VHF. 
Modef XV2 
Kit S79 

Wired $149 
(Specify band) 



Exciter 
Input Range 

28-30 

28-29 

28-30 
27-27.4 

28-30 

50-54 
144-146 

50-54 
144-148 



Antenna 
Output 

144-146 
145-146 

50-52 
144-144.4 
220-222' 
220*224 

50-52 

144-148 

28-30 



For UHF. 
Model XV4 
Kit $99 
Wired $169 



28-30 
28-30 
50-54 
61^5 
144-148 



432-434 

435-437 

432-438 

439-25 



'Add S20 far 2M input 




VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use wflh 
above. Power levels from 10 to 45 Watts. 
Several models, kits from $78. 



LOOK AT THESE 
ATTRACTIVE CURVESl 





I 


tf 




/ 




t 


\ iviv 


I 




7 




i1» mt 


1 V^ 1 » 

1-^ <io Iff 



i 












■ 
















































/ 
















/ 






. 


















.; 








\ 
















/ 


1 — 










K 




2 


- 






' ' 1 







Typicst Sefectivfty Curves 
of RocGivGTS and 



IMPORTANT REASONS WHY 
YOU SHOULD BUY FROM TH E 
VALUE LEADER: 

h Largest sefection of vhf and uhf kits 
in ihe worid. 

2, Exc&piional Quaflty and tow prfces due 
to iarge voiume, 

3 Fasi delivery; most kfts ^uppm^a^ne day. 

4. Compete, prohssfon^f ifmfruolk>n 
menKiat^. 

5. Prompt factory servfce avBf table and 
free phone consuftatfon. 

6. fn business 21 years. 

7. Seti more rep&ater modutes than alt 
other mfrs. and have for years. Can give 
quality features for much jfowfler cost 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send S1 .00 or 4 IRC'c for overseas mailing) 
Order by phone or mail • Add $3 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weeliends} 
Use VISA. MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. 



amironics, inc. 

65'A MOUL RD. • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 716-392-9430 

Hamtronics ' is a registered trademark 



*^S^ Ltst ot Advertisers an page 1 14 



73 Magazine • May. 1984 143 



^■■p 



John J Meshna Jr., Inc. 



1^122 



19 Alkrton Street • Lynn, MA 01.904 • Tel: (617) 595-2275 





p-r-r 



1 



DUAL FLOPPY DISC DRIVES 

BRAND NEW, dual floppy disc drives made for Digital Equipment Corp. (D 
model no. RX 180 AB). This beautiful piece of computer hi^dware consists 
2 Shugart compatible TEAC 40 track, double density, 514" mini-floppy disc 
drives brand new in the case with their own regulated, switching power supp 
cooling fan & on/off switch. Each unit also comes with a line cord & docum 
tation. These were made for DEC, but are also compatible with other person 
computers such as IBM, TRS 80 models I, II, III, & the Color Computer, an 
other Shugart compatible interfaces. NaturaDy you supply the cables and di 
controller card to suit your particular system. The RX 180 AB runs off of I 
/230 VAC 50/60 Hz, w/out any modifications to the drives. Each system co 
in the original factory box and are guaranteed functional . A blockbuster of i 
buy ! ! Shpg, wt, 20 lb. Stock no. RX 180 AB $250-00 

HIGH SPEED KSR PRINTER TERMINAL 

World famous, high speed G, E. Terminet 1200 RS 232 KSR printer terminals are 
now in stock ready for shipment to you. This has to be one of the finest letter qual- 
ity printers ever offered at a bargain price. These terminals can be used as an RS 231 
asynchronous communications terminal or used in the local mode as a typewriter. 
The terminals were removed from service for upgrading. Highlights of these machine 
are: Standard RS 232, full duplex, asynchronous data comm., fully formed upper ar 
lower case letters, 128 character ASCII set, selectable baud rates of 110, 300, or 12( 
BPS, 80 columns on pin feed paper, and less weight & size than an ASR 35 teletype 
with far less racket They are virtually electronically foolproof as every pc board is 
Pico fuse protected. Should your machine not work, just check the on board fuses £ 
9 out of 10 times that is where the problem lies. Schematics are provided w/ each m 
chine sold. Current price of tiiis machine new is over $2000.00 ! Our meager price f 
this fantastic printer is only 10% of this: $200.00 each!!! Visually inspected prior t- 
shipment to insure completeness* Shpd« truck freight collect $200.00 







5 MEGABYTE SEAGATE ST 506 5'4" MICROWINCHESTER HARD DISC DRIVES 

The Seagate Technology ST 506 MicroWinchester hard disc drives are identical in size and mountinf 
configuration to the industiy standard 5M" niini*floppy disc drives. These drives utilise 2 5*4" fixed 
platters as storage media. Each surface employs 1 read/write head to service 153 tracks. The storage 
capacity is 5 megabytes formatted ! The voltage requirements are only 5vdc 700m a & 12vdc 1.6 am) 
hardly more than a regular mini-floppy drive. The drives we have are in beautiful condition and loot 
to be unused. Each one comes with factory literature which includes the pinouta. The ST 506 *s will 
run with computer systems from Kay pro, IBM, Xerox, and other Shugart compatible interfaces whei 
used with the proper controller card {not provided). Only 10 pieces in stock, so order early. 
Seagate ST 506 Shpg. wt 9 lb. $300.00 2/$575.00 




IBM model no. 745 




Send for free data sheet 



NEW IBM SELECTRIC BASED TYPEWRITER PRINTERS 

These rugged, handsome printers were made for one of the giants of the computer industry. Th< 
can be used as a standard typewriter or as a printer in a word processing system for true letter 
quality printing. Solenoids were added to the selectric mechanism which cUsabled the manual re 
peat function but still allows electronic repeat functions. It uses standard IBM typing balls. Thf 
voltage requirements are standard 115 vac, 5 vdc @ 100 ma, & 24 vdc @ 4 amps. All are new in 
factory box^, but may require adjustments. We provide literature and schematics with 1 ribbon 
& cleaning tools. With the addition of our Centronics to Selectric I/O adapter, you could easil> 
interface this printer to almost any micro computer system. 

Typewriter Printer stock no, RE lOOOA $375.00 shpg wt approx. 80 lb. shpd, by truck coUec 
Centronics to Selectric adapter. Fully tested & operational $245.00 Shpd. UPS 15 lb. 




SHUGART 901 8" FDD 
We just got in a small lot of nice clean 
world re known Shugart 8*' disc drives. 
Single side J single density units. Each 
/ drive will come with data on using the 
901's in 801 compatible systems which 
should make them very versatile. Sche- 
matics are also provided. Used, good 
condition. Shpg, wt 15 lb. $75.00 



I 



BA 279 BATTERIES 

Unused surplus from Uncle 
Sam, Output is i35v, 67W 
V, 6v, & lV4v, Socket is 
made to fit plug from PRC 
8,9j& 10. May fit other rigs 
as welL Current list price is 
$42.25. Our price is only 
$15.00 Shpg. wt 9 lb. 




Phone Orders accepted on MC, VISA, or AMEX Surnlus Electronic Material 
No COD s. TeLl-617-595-2275 

144 73 Magazine • May, 19S4 



Send for our free 72 page catalogue jam 
packed with goodies. 



1 




THE FIRST NAME 
ELECTRONIC TEST GEAR 




NEW FROM RAMSEY-20 MHz 
DUAL TRACE OSCILLOSCOPE 

Unsurpassed quality at an unbeatable price, the Ramsey oscilloscope 
compares to others costing hundreds more. Features include a compo- 
nent testing circuit that will allow you lo easily lest resistors, capacitors, 
digital Circuits and diodes * TV video sync filler « wide bandwidth & 
high sensitrvtty * internal graircule * high quality reciangutdr CRT 

• front panel trace rotator • Z axis • high sensiteviiy n-y mode • very 
low power consumption • regutated powef supply • built-m calibrator 

• rock sohd triggering * htgh quality hook-on probes 



$39995 



high quaUty 

hook-on prober inclyded 




RAMSEY 0-1100 

VOM-MULTITESTER 

Compact arid reliable, de- 
signed to ser^'ce a wtde tati:- 
eEy of equipment features in- 
clude * mirror back s^cate 
• dcubie-|(«weled precision 
moving coil • doubt© over- 
load proioctiorii • sn id^al low 
cost unit iof The begrnner or 
as a spare ba:Cic-yp uniL 

$1995 

ieit lead» Mtid baHgry 




RAMSEY 0-2100 
DIGITAL MULT1TESTER 

A compBCT easy to ute unif 
assignees lo operate irke a pro 
Featun^ng • 3'.^ dtgit LCD • low 
BAT indicator •all range oyer- 
load protecUon • overf^fige indi- 
cation * aulo-poiartty • Transis- 
tor lester • duaf-slope integra- 
tion • vmyi cerrying caae 

$5495 

^P£ test leadi,, battery 1 vinyl 
carrying C«»e rnclud^iJ 




RAMSEY 0-3100 
DIGITAL MULTIMETER 

Reita^Dle, accurate- d(§^ial 
rn^asgfemefits at an arrisz- 
mgly low cost * fn- 1 me color 
coded puBh tjutton^, speeds 
range selection • abspjasiic 
tMt stand • recassed fnput 
jacks • overload proiectiiCin 
on atl ranges • T^ digit LCD 
display wilh auto zero, auto 
polarity A low BAT mOiC^tor 




i«*t I«a4$ and baittry 
in eluded 




CT-70 7 DIGIT 
525 MHz COUNTER 

Lab quality at a bfea km rough pnce. 
FeaTures * 3 trequency ranges each' 
with pre amp • dual selectable gale 
times • gale activity in dJca lor 

• SOrtiV ^'" T50 MHz typical sensiiiviiy 

• wjde troqui^ncy range • i ppm 
accyfacv 

$ii995 

wired includes AC adapter 

CT-TO kit , S99.95 

BP-4 mead pack . . 8-95 





DM -700 DIGITAL 
MULTIMETER 

PrDies:.'! M Mil quality ai a hobbyisi 
price Feoiores incliide ^GdiTferent 
ranges and b furTctions * 3 dtgu, ' 
•rvcfr LEO display * aolomaiic decimal* 
; -icement • auto ma! ic polarity 

$11995 

wired includei AC a^fap'ltr 



DM-700mi . . , 
WP-l probe sel 



£99.95 
4.95 



CT-90 9 DIGIT 
600 MHz COUNTER 

The most vers af He tor less than $300 

Features 3 selectable gale [rmes • 9 
digits • gale mditalor • display hold 

* 25mV rni 150 MH; typical sensiiiuily 

• 1G MHz limeha&e lor WWVcaiitsra- 
iion • 1 ppm accyfacy 

* 14995 

wirad includes AC adapter 

GT-90fert . $129.9S 

DV- 1 T PPM oven timebase 59,95 
BP'4 nica^ pack ,._ B.95 




PS-2 AUDIO 
MULTIPLIER 



The PS-2 IS handy tar |-iigili resglulion 
audjo resolulion rneasurements rnul- 
liplies UP m tT^equency • great ior PL 
i£>n«measurefnen{$ • muniphe&by 10 
or 100 • 01 Hi re&oiut»ofi A buiil>m 
stgnai pf^arTTp'CorkdiliOfief 



S4995 





CT-125 9 DIGIT 
1.2 GHz COUNTER 

A 9 diigh counter that will ou [perform 
untiscosflng tiundredsmofe. * gate 
Indicator • 24mV ca 150 MHi typical 
Bensltlvily • 9 digit display • 1 ppm 
accuracy * display tiotd * dual mpuis 
1^41 h preamps 

$169^5 

wired include! AC adapter 

8^-4 nicad pack ..,...«.. , .a.9S 




PS-^kit 



S3995 



PR-2 COUNTER 
PREAMP 

the PR-2 IS idftai lor measuring week 
s^ignais trom iQ to 1 ,0D0 MH^ • flat 25 
dboain • 8NC connectors ■ g^eai for 
aniMitig RF * ideal receaveri^TV^ 
ptcajnp 

$4495 

w^red Incjudet AC adapter 

PR-^itit S34.gS 



ACCESSORIES FOR RAMSEY COUNTERS 

Telescopic whi[>artlenna—BNCplyg ,. S 8,95 
High impedance probe. Hghl loading , , . 16.95 

Low pass probe, audio yse 16.95 

Direct probe, general purpose use , . , . . 13,95 
Till baiL lor CT-70, 90. 125 , 3.95 



ma&tei cliaig^^ 



^vtSk^ 



CT-50 8 DIGIT 
600 MHz COUNTER 



A vefsatile lab bench counter with 
optional receive frequency adapter, 

which turns ihe CT-SO into s digital 
readout tor most any receiver • 25 mV 
ifi: 15{] MH? lypical sensitivity • B digtt 
display « 1 ppm accuracy 



$169^5 



CT-50 kil 

HA-i receiver adapter Hit 



$139.95 
. 14.f5 




PS-IB 600MHz 
PRESCALER 

Extends thi? naricie oi youf present 
coupler lo 600 UH^ • 2 stage preamp 

• divide by IDcircLUlry * sensilivity 
25fnV i 150 M Hi • BNC connectors 

• dnvesany counter 




wired (nciuifes AC adapter 
PS-ie kit 



549,95 



'nf -bl-ifthabl 



_-^ t^^ ^ 



PHONE ORDERS CAU 

716-586-3950 

TELEX 4fiBy35 RAMSEY CI 



TEfllVtS: • satlstfldloff 5!J3fanlBid • ejiiminefor IB days: H nol plessed rettjrn in 
arlgiral [Grni tor reluncl * add S'n lor shipping and msurdnce 1Q i maxinitim q\ 



f;0 00 ■ ov«rs«i^ 4dd 15' Ipr ^urlsi^e mail • COD add £?50 (COD in USA QfUyj 
• QTd£r£ andcf S15 QQ idd S I 50 » MY restdefilt idit P . sitei in * 90 diy paMs 
wirrai^ly on jll kiis * 1 yeif pirti A libv viirriatv vn ill irired unets 



T:rT-r= RAMSEY ElECTROIilCSJIIC, 



Ftt}Ut\±HX 14628 



^266 



f*SeB List of A&verrtsers on page 114 



73 Magazine • May, 1084 145 



DEALER 
DIRECTORY 



Culver Cibr' CA 

JiDi't E:lDC«F4ainH J^19 Scpdvod« Bl:vd., CuKcr 
Gll^ CA 9&mi, 59fl-SOn3. Tritdct 45:] J0A» Snn 
DIegQ, §27-^3£ (RenQ NV» 

FmitaiuCA 

CocipIflCa' iina ICOM. DchTedd. Tcq-Tk^ 
Mtrifc; GuMCf Lunar p ow <O0O d«a «o ic 
product! ibr hobbyl*. '"*"^"«". rrp^ 
iTMitvt Al«$ CB ndle. kmbBoiik. FiBtAiM 
OictRfiki. »fi3S SkRA A«*.« FMtiH CA 
■EOS. &22-7710. 

San lam CA 

Bi)' irei'i newest nitiiiliHir ridUo dura. Nnw 
4r llHd imjiteur rAidJii uiet & servioc. We 
iMiufif Kenwood, iCOMt Aj(d«fi, Tawii, Ten- 
T«Ck Saittec^ mmay mtmr. Shaver Badld, Litr.i,^ 
i:>Ti So. BMCcm Avc.« 5u Jm CA ffitlil. 



Ajin Arbof MI 

See 141 for pmducti Mke Trti-Tw, R. L. Diiaike, 
EtenTran and muny tnoK. OpiTii Mondajr ihroiigh 
Saturday, 0830 to 1730. WB8VCH. \mUXO, 
WDSOKN, tad WeRP behind the nnmter Fiir- 

livania Ml 



Call F^ H'DBAHO. Wacem PfKHovuta^s, 
S?600 SdMMkn^ Road, Livmia Ml 4Si50, 
523-li50, 

Hudson NM 

Lml^t— bmiQi, SWLa, ud tSttHTtcnerten: 
parts, booki. ij^ti, Mtl«njUA. lowen. Call for 
qiwts Pokarii ELECntOMCS CENTEK. 
II LvweQ lUwl iBDUlc 3AU Hi^Isb >iU 0305 L. 



NewCi5tkDE 

FBctny A^kxisd DmIm' Vauu, tCOM, T»- 
7m, KDK. Ajdm. A£A. KuNmvs^ Su««: Fiil 
lint of aujMuiMJL Nfi uIm tas in DelavL mh^ Qna 
mlk (3^ t'9i5 Dciawarr Amatetii St^fiyt 7 1 
MMdnw Hiwil, Npw CaiJe DE I972D» SK-Tnt. 

BobelD 

Boclfy MountAln aHjid't mVo'tH huffi dealer, Cal] 
flJM tun lor AEA, Axdeo, KDK. Tcu-Tw, B^it- 
lemnt. Cuifacnft. and m^ttl tLlM. EkEtmni^m, 
4204 Overland. Boua ID SITK. 34S-4dLi. 

FkuluiJ u/ 

Hak WBTBYZ has tiw lariM Hixk {tf amalMf 
fAf in tbe Icilennoiatitain Wot and the b^ 
prkn CaU me ft>t d1 ytn^r tvin nndl iott 
Dtttributiiig^ 78 So. Si«iv, Pr^ebi ID 83103+ 

Littleton MA 

Thr rdlahlf! hatn ftore lervln^ N£. FlJI Line of 
ZCOM & Kenwood. YaauHTi. Dtake, D«lwa, 
B&W aco^HuiesL Ctiitb & Trac keyoL Lanun, 
UMdatf, TdflLrHy-Caia pnxkieti. Mtrafa 
•ftlpl>« A*mn F-S., Alalia Diila protecton, 
ARRL & EantniQto (UtrvztKia 4idiL ^liMkr 
ra^kf dctacbm. FtiU liM <m| eou Btttep* 
TEL— COM ElttTb-Bok Cpmm^gptkam tTS 
GmI Rd. iHl 119>. UiUcliA MA 01460, 
4§fi-3400C»40. 



Albanv^ New^ York 
UPSTATE NE\I YORK 

Kenwood^ [COM, T«-T*Ch aal<iRn, Cushcmft. 
Laiiea, HuM^, ARRL, Hy Gain, B&W. MF|. 
Mfra^. New and lued eqi|ltHnt*nt Sening tJie 
amatftir community \\ncv U42, Adirondnt^ 
Elt-rtranS™, Inc., XfrBl Central Avmwe. Aibany 
N¥ I2m^. ISli (KL03 (ciiie mile wi^ tif Narihwa> 

Coltmibus OH 

TW t igpM nal tioc ham ibBa in iIk hfiiivdi 
fe^Nnrfnc Kfn««»d and fitber i|iallty p i uduiJ* 
'*lih WTirkmi liipla:}'!. W« nil naif tlir btA As- 
dmcuDd K«Q»»d xnia. VBtvanI Ama1n» 
Badj(). Ux., Uee AhU Dt.^ BaywidibBs (Co^ 
hmahm} OH 43(168. "^-it&T. 



DflUas TX 

IBM PC'Appk aJWmarkrt pirdducil; hnbb^lsb" 
elfctronljcri pr0|«itt kitx t50.00 cxTtnpletE modem 
MU suhtaipkioiiiitMiHt; TV ^&^ kiti. 
ESWOM profraniipcT dqpjJMter, pDfiul;!; 
IC tafiBi, data AHta, AppbotiDn 
than 0DOO parbi io tfack imm- 
vidm prcdijni. tobb 
write fnt |muf fter iHtfattii^ catalog. Itsr- 
'n^X MIS-M Airllar lUL. 
OylaiTltTUOe. 




DEALERS 

Your oofnpony name and 
CHQ contmn up to 25 wofds for as 
little as $150 v'early (prepaid), or 
115 per month (prq>atd quarterly). 
No mention of mail-ordtr bLL^iness 
or &Tm code permltttxl. Directory teirt 
and payment must reach us 60 days in 
advance of publication. For example, 
■ch/ertiang for the August *Bi ]amm 
mu^ be in our hands b>' June lie. 
Mail lo 73 Magazine, Felerfaarau^ 
NR 03458. ATTN: NuiMcy Qanip*. 



PROPAGATION 



J, H. Nelson 
4 Plymouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GMT: 


oe 


W 


na 


M 


M 


in 


*3 


M 


It 


ts 


^ 


*l 


At ASK a 


u 


■ii 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


,: -, • i I 14 


AflGENTINA 


21 


li, 


14 


14 


T 


7 


li 


14A 


21 ' 


23a 


2lA 


21 


AUSTRALIA 


21 


lit 


1^ 


TB 


7H 


7S 


7 


7 


70 


7B 


I4A 


14A 


CAJSIAL ZONE 


14A 


14 


14 


J 


7 


7 


U 


U 


14 


14A 


21 


21 


ENGM^NO 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7A 


U 


14 


t4A 


Ua 


L4a 


14 


Hawati 


21 


U 


14 


TB 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


IHOU 


14 


U 


79 


71 


?B 


n 


u 


14 


14 


14 


14 


14 


M'axi 


14a 


14 


7B 


79 


71 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14 


IHKICCJi 


KA 


14 


14 


7 


7 


1 


7 


** 


14 


14 


21 


I4A 


MhtlUIWtKES 


14a| Ui 


l^B 


7& 


~! 


TB 


7B 


Hi' 


14 


14 


14 


14 ' 


RJERTOmCO 


14A 


1^ 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14 


14 A 


14A 


tOUTM AFRIca 


~f 


"" r 


T ' 


"5 


75 


14 


14 


14A 


21 


ZlA 


li 


U 


USSR 


iMh 


[ ' 


7 


;■ 


7 


7B 


lA 


\h 


14 


14A 


\Uk 


14 ' 


WIST COAST 


y^A 


14A 


7 


1 
f 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


K 


]^A, 


Ka 


CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: 


ALA^na 


[''* 


U 


« j_ 


■™ 


1 




? 


1 ili 


^ - !i^ 


ABGENTIUta 


2 ! 


14a 


1 . 


!■. 


■m 




1- 


. -i - 


'::. .. ;t 


AusrnauA 


** 


I4A 


1- 


n 


■f^ 


7H 


# 


.1 


r& 


■ -^ ■ 


CAHAL ZCMi 


11 


U 


14 


7 


7 




14 


14 


14A 


:- A^ 


. lA . 


lIMiUUItJ 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


' 




7A 


TI^ 


r^ 


j. — 


^^h 


i4 


iHtawaii 


?1 


14A 


14 


7 


7 




7 


7 


U 


U 


Ua 


l^A 


iiiOiH 


II* 


£«. 


lit 


7S 


7B 


7B 


71 


141^ 


14 


14 


14 


14 


JA^aiy 


14A 


UA 


14B 


?» 


7B 




7 


7 


14 


14 


14 


14 


MEXICO 


li 


]i 


7 


7 


7 




7 


7A 


14 


14 


14 


14 


PMIMPflNES 


14A 


lit 


liB 


7fl 


7B 


7B 


7a 


14a 


14 


14 


14 


14 


Pt^ERTORICG 


:i 


lAA 


L4 


7 


7 




14 


u 


U 


14A 


2] 


2] 


■OUTH AFRICA 


7B 


7 


7 


?B 


7B 


7$ 


14 


14 


u 


14 A 


14 


14 


r W. t. i H. 


UB 


7 


7 


7 


7 


71 


14B 


14 


14 


14 


Si 


14 



WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


14 


14 


7A 


i 


7 


lA 


3A 


T ':i4 


14 j|4 


U 


AROEiiiTlJ^A 


21 


L4A 


U 


14 


7 


7 1 


7B 


I4A 


;i UA ^lA 


n _ 


AUSTRALIA 


3IA 


2\ ' 


31 


14 


14 


[4 


' 7 


7 


?B 


7B 


14A 


i\h 


CAMAL ZONE 


31 


14 


14 


il 


7 ' 


7 


7A 


14 


14 


14A 


2IA 


21A 


EhHCLAND 


7AB 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 a 


14» 


14 


14 


1^ 


14 


HAWAII 


21A 


n 


14A 


14 


14 


7 A 


7 


7 


14 


14A 


21 


:i 


INDIA 


14 


14 


\L 


14 


7li 


7[i 


7B 


14U 


14 


14 


\h 


14 


^ JAPAN 


I4A 


UA 


14 


14B 


14H 


7 


7 


7 


14 


14 


U 


14a 


MfXlCO 


i4A 


14 


14 


7 


4 
J 


7 


7A 


i4 


14 


14 


14A 


14A 


PHItliYiNf:^ 


IhA 


14 


14 


1 14B 


141 


'B 


78 


UB 


14 


14 


14 


14A 


PUERTO R3 CO 


21 


14A 


14 


1 f 


7 1 


7 


7 


|4 


AL- 


U 


21 


31 


iOUT>|AJFRlCa 


7R 


7 ' 


7 


7B 


n I 


Tl 


7& 


14 


14 


14 


14 


14 


U.t«.«. 14B 


TB ' 


7 


7 


7 i 


Tl 


7S 


141 


1* 


14 


l^ 


141 


I«T COAST l.jK 


^\^k 


7 


il 


4 
■1 


7 


7 


14 


1* 


U 


HA 


14A 



A- Next higher frequency band may also be yseful. 
B = Difficult circuit this period. 

First letter ^ night waves. Second ^ day waves. 

G = Good, F = Fair, P = Poor. * = Chance of solar flares. 

# = Chance of aurora. 

NOTE THAT r^lGHT WAVE LETTEA NOW COMES FIRST. 



SUN 



MON 



Tue 



May 



IMJ 



FH 



SAT 



6 



7 



1 



G/Q 



8 



2 3 

F/G I F/F 



4 5 



F/G 



pyG 



13 



9 10 tl 12 

F/G F/G I _G/G G/ G G/G , F/F P/F 

14 15^ 16 17 18 IST" 

F/G G/G G/G I G/G 




146 73 Magazine • May, 1934 



T-77TlieBiq for All Seasons! 

Answering the call for an HF rig that goes everywhere^ sounds great, and is 
cost^ffectivei Yaesu proudly introduces the FT-77 Compact HF Transceiver System. 




Computerized Design and Manufactura 

The FT-77 design engineers utilized the latest computerized circuit board layout methods, resulting in a 
compact, reliable transceiver with maximum utilization of available space. Automated insertion techniques are 
used in assembly, providing improved reliability and quality control over earlier desiqns. 

Operating Versatility 

Tlie FT-77 is equipped for operation on all amateur bands between 3.5 and 29.7 MHz, including the three new 
WARC bands. Fully operational on SSB and CW, the FT-77 includes a dual width noise blanker (designed to 
minimize the "Woodpecker or ignition noise), full SWR metering, R.IT,, and optional CW filter with wide/ 
nan^ow selection. The optional FM-77 pemnits operation on the FM mode, with front panel squelch sensitivity 
controL 

Expandable Station Concept 

Ideal for mobile operation because of its compact size and light weight, the FT-77 forms the nucleus of a 
versatile base station. Available as options for the FT-77 are the FP-700 AC Power Supply, FV-700DM 
Synthesized External VFO and Memory System, FTV-707 VHF/UHF Transverter, and FC-700 Antenna 
Coupler, providing top performance at an extraordinarily low price. 

Best of All, tfs a Yaesy) 

With most experience in transceiver design and manufacture, the Yaesu trademark is your guarantee of 
quality and durability; WeVe got all-new technology and an all-new wan^anty policy to back it up. 



See the FT-77 and the ail new line of Yaesu HF. VHF, and 



s, receivers 



and accessories at your Yaesu Dealer today! It's time you Med a Yaesu! 



Price And Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 




w 



ThG radiOm 






^«i 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORPORATION, 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 

YAESU Cincinnati Service Center, 9070 Gold Park Dr. Hamilton, Ohio 45011 



(213) 633-4007 
(513)874-3100 






TS-430S "Digital DX-terity!" 



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